The Early Shops and Businesses of the eastern side of Norfolk Street, Glossop.

This article aims to document the occupants of the shops and business of the eastern side of Norfolk Street, between High Street East and Ellison Street, from the mid 1830s to around 1940, using available records in censuses, directories and newspapers. Any additional information will be gratefully received.
I must acknowledge the help of Mike Brown for allowing me to use photos from his collection and providing information about his family's links to Norfolk Street.

Norfolk Street, 1920s
A view up Norfolk Street in the 1920s.

In early directories and census records, the lower end of Norfolk Street was often documented as Howard Town, High Street and even Market Street in one record. It is only by comparing records from various sources that one can work out which businesses were where. In several cases businesses occupied two or more adjacent properties which were previously separate and/or later divided. The Poor Law map of 1857 shows that all the original properties had been built by then.

1857 map

2 & 4 Norfolk Street

The properties were probably built at the same time as number 1 High Street East by Samuel Shepley (see A Shepley family of Charlesworth). He is the earliest occupant we know of, worked out through comparison of records over several years, and listed in Pigot's directory of 1835 as a currier &c at Howard’s town. He may well have been occupying the corner property as well as the order of entries in the 1841 census seems to indicate that earlier ones were in High Street East whilst the one after Samuel was Joseph Robinson (see 14-16 Norfolk Street below). It appears that the enumerator of the 1851 census was unfamiliar with the area as this property and others further along High Street East are listed as Market Street. Samuel Shepley is listed as a leather dealer, with similar descriptions in the directories up to White's of 1862. However, Samuel seems to have been using just number 2 as number 4 is listed as “One house uninhabited” on the census form.

Over the next 20 years some records refer to the business as number 2 and some as 2 & 4. It may well be that during periods when number 4 had no tenant, the Shepley business used the two properties.

In the 1861 census Samuel is recorded as an ironmonger. In addition to his son Thomas, his daughter Nancy is living there with her husband Thomas McKnight, a stone mason, and two daughters. In Harrod's of 1870 the business is listed in Samuel Shepley's name as an ironmonger, earthenware dealer, leather-cutter, &c. (in High Street). There is no entry for the shop in the 1871 census as Samuel, who had retired, and Thomas (a currier), were living at Whitfield. There is, however, an entry for 1 High Street East, the occupiers being the family of Thomas and Nancy McKnight, Thomas being described as an ironmonger. Directories in the 1870s and the 1881 census contain separate listings for the two Thomases but describing them both similarly so either they were running as a partnership or in competition next door to each other.

Thomas Shepley married Sarah Ann Barber (daughter of Owen Barber, see number 6 below) on 5 November 1871 at St. John's, Deansgate, Manchester. An advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 17 May 1873 indicates that Thomas Shepley had also started selling sewing machines. Thomas died on 29 August 1886. In an advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 25 December 1886, Sarah, giving an address of 2 & 4 Norfolk Street, announced that she would carry on the business but within a year or so she had sold up.

2-4 Norfolk Street
Sarah Ann Shepley's advertisement of 25 December 1886.

The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 11 February 1888 carried an advertisement for Joseph Beeley, General Draper at 2 Norfolk Street, which he later named Manchester House. His wife ran a millinery arm of the business. Joseph later branched out into selling decorations for balls and bazaars but the business didn't last as the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter 1 August 1890 carried an advertisement headed Under Deed of Assignment, announcing positively the last three weeks extension of the great sale at the shop lately occupied by Joseph Beeley, 2 Norfolk Street. Three weeks later the newspaper advertised that an auction for the whole of the shop fittings and fixtures at 2 Norfolk Street would take place on 3 September.

The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 3 October 1890 carried an advertisement from James Robinson, Painter, Paper Hanger, Glazier and General Decorator, stating that he had moved to 2 & 4 Norfolk Street, next door to Mr T. McKnight, Ironmonger. The newspaper also carried a report headed Improvement of Property which went on “During the past week or two extensive alterations and improvements have been effected in the shop lately occupied by Mr. Joseph Beeley, in Norfolk Street, by the tenant, Mr James Robinson, painter and decorator, who has removed from High Street West. The signboard over the doorway is a really beautiful specimen of decorative art, being executed on a groundwork of rich stone colour, relieved with maroon border and letters shaded with green and intermixed with gold. The position is a good one, being close to the station, and we hope Mr Robinson will meet with that encouragement which the energy he infuses into his business deserves.”.
James Robinson stayed for nearly 13 years, advertising in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 4 September 1903 that he had moved from 2 Norfolk Street to Jackson's Buildings (Under YMCA Rooms), Victoria Street (see Early occupants of the north end of Victoria Street, Glossop; Jackson's Buildings and its predecessors.). Two weeks earlier, Nancy McKnight of 61 Norfolk Street (widow of Thomas who had died on 24 October 1898) advertised “Good shop, two windows, No. 4 Norfolk Street now occupied by James Robinson. At liberty on September 1st.”.

No further separate tenant of 2 Norfolk Street has been identified. It may be that the property became incorporated into 1 High Street East when Hepworth's made "extensive alterations to extend the premises" in 1906.

Between 1925 and 1928, Barclays Bank had moved to 1 High Street East and acquired number 2 Norfolk Street at the same time, the properties being completely redeveloped.
In 1932, Kelly's directory listed the tenants of Barclays Bank Buildings as; Frederick Pickup, insurance broker and Clifford Holliday, resident inspector for the Provincial Insurance Company Ltd.
In 1936 Kelly listed Walter Swift, accountant, and Holliday & Pickup, insurance brokers, as a partnership.
The listings in Kelly's directory of 1941 are Walter Swift, accountant & agent for the Halifax Building Society, and James Samson Snailham, customs, excise & old age pensions officer.

4 Norfolk Street.

As noted above the premises were listed as uninhabited in the 1851 census. The Glossop Record of 15 October 1859 carried an advertisement for James Nightingale, Grocer, tea and provision dealer, commercial tea and coffee rooms, Norfolk Street (opposite the Norfolk Arms Inn); dealer in hosiery and all kinds of smallwares. He had been there for some time as White's directory of 1857 lists Jas. Nightingale, heald looker. The 1861 census describes James Nightingale as a grocer & beer seller but he obviously ran into trouble shortly afterwards as the Glossop Record of 2 November 1861 reported on the insolvency of James Nightingale who formerly kept a beerhouse and provision dealer's and grocer's shop in Norfolk Street. The shop was in possession of his mother in law and major creditor, Mrs Boyer, where she was carrying on the business. His wife and family were still living there. The entry in White's directory of 1862 is for James Boyer, Beerhouse.

In an advertisement in the Glossop Record of 8 November 1862, William Ingerson announced that he had moved to the shop lately occupied by James Nightingale, next door to Mr Samuel Shepley, currier, and opposite the Norfolk Arms Hotel and would open that day. He stayed only about two years as he advertised his move from Norfolk Street to Norfolk Square in the Glossop Record of 17 November 1866.

The next two occupants appear to have been short lived. In the Glossop Record of 17 October 1868, E & M Chatterton announced that they had opened a new Millinery and Drapery establishment in the shop lately occupied by Mr. Dyson, Confectioner (opposite the Norfolk Arms Hotel). They had named it Paris House.

Only 3 months later, in the Glossop Record of 23 January 1869, M. & J. Ashcroft, Milliners & Dressmakers, announced that they had removed to the shop opposite the Norfolk Hotel. Harrod's directory of 1870 lists John Ashcroft, Milliner & dressmaker, but the census of 1871 makes it clear that his wife Mary was the skilled dressmaker, describing John Ashcroft as a superannuated postman. It isn't clear how long the business lasted but Mrs Mary Ashcroft is listed as a milliner & dress maker at High Street West in the Post Office Directory of 1876.

No further separate information has been found for number 4 until Septimus Shoebridge moved from number 8 to larger premises at number 4, opening on 5 February 1904, selling hats &c.
On the evening of Sunday 20th March 1904, the Whitfield tram car started to run away when travelling down Littlemoor. The car tore, out of control, down Victoria Street, crossed lines in High Street and came to a stop with its front "feet" going into the cellar of Shoebridge's shop. He took immediate advantage by advertising the new "terminus" in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter 25 March 1904.

Norfolk Street about 1909/10
The lower end of Norfolk Street before 1909 as the Railway Hotel/old Conservative Club can be seen.

No exact date has been found for Shoebridge leaving. His last advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter was 20 March 1908. He was, though, named, as a committee member of Glossop Tuesday F.C. in a report in the issue dated 2 September 1910 so it would appear that he was still in Glossop then. At the time of the 1911 census he was a salesman for the Royal Tailoring Company, boarding with the family of Beniah Daniel in Rotherham.

The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 16 June 1911 carried a Notice “The misses Harding & Bradley desire to inform the public of Glossop and district that they have opened the shop, 4 Norfolk Street, Glossop, with a choice selection of millinery and fancy goods. Mourning orders strictly attended to.”.
Some mystery surrounds the use of the name “The misses Harding & Bradley” because the business was run by Mrs Eliza Harding (widowed only just over 3 weeks earlier) and her daughter Gertrude, who had trained in millinery with the Higginbottoms at 17 High Street West since 1902. Later advertisements and the sign above the shop door use the name The Norfolk Milliners. The shop was initially rented before being purchased on 8 January 1920.

4 Norfolk Street
Number 4 Norfolk Street when occupied by the Hardings.

Kelly's directory of 1912 lists Mrs Eliza Harding, milliner, at number 4, with similar entries in the directories of 1925, 1928, 1932 and 1936 and the 1941 directory listing E. & G. Harding. This despite the facts that Gertrude had married Albert Victor Shirt on 24 September 1917, giving 4 Norfolk Street as her address, and Eliza Harding (of 4 Norfolk Street) had died on 13 September 1922. Probate of Eliza's estate went to her daughters Edith Louisa Bradshaw (wife of George Bradshaw) and Gertrude Shirt (wife of Albert Victor Shirt).

4 Norfolk Street
Advertisement for E & G Harding, 1926.

6 & 8 Norfolk Street.

Initial records for the property are for number 6 but from 1874 number 8 starts to be used both together with and separately from number 6. It appears that the properties were built by Samuel Shepley (above).

The first identified occupant is John Ellis, hairdresser, who is listed in Slater's directory of 1850, the 1851 census and the Post Office directory of 1855.
White's directories of 1857 and 1862 list another Ellis, William Henry and the 1861 census records William H. Ellis, hairdresser, with his wife, Jane, and young children at the shop. William is likely to have been the son of John Ellis as that was his father's name recorded when he and Jane Thomas married in Ashton under Lyne on 1 December 1857. The Glossop Record of 1 October 1864 announced that Henry Ellis, hairdresser, Norfolk Street, died on 24 September aged 31.

Owen Barber, father of Sarah Ann who married Thomas Shepley (see above), who already had a hairdressing shop on High Street then took over the business. He is listed at Norfolk Street as one of the agents for the Record on 22 April 1865. In an advertisement in the Glossop Record of 15 September 1866, Owen Barber stated he was in business in Norfolk Street and High Street so must have retained his original shop when he took over from Ellis.

Owen Barber died, aged 53, in October 1866 and the following month advertisements started to include the name of his eldest son, Albert, but in 1868 the youngest son, Edwin, was listed as agent for the Record. In the Glossop Record of 8 October 1870, Edwin Barber announced that he had opened a new watch, clock and jewellery establishment at 6 Norfolk Street. It appears that he lived and worked there whilst Albert had the High Street shop.

The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 3 January 1874 advertised that Edwin Barber was in liquidation and all jewellery stock, trade fixtures &c were to be sold by auction on 15 and 16 January. Edwin presumably came out of the sale well enough because the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 15 August 1874 carried an advertisement dated 31 July from Edwin Barber, Hairdresser, residing at 6 & 8 Norfolk Street, giving notice of applying for a licence at the Licensing Meeting to allow Public Billiard Playing at 6 Norfolk Street (occupied by him as a dwelling house and hairdresser's shop and which he rented from Abraham Sheppard, surviving trustee and executor under the will of Samuel Shepley deceased). He also applied for a licence for 170 Station Road, Hadfield for the same purpose. The licence was granted by the justices for Hadfield, as an experiment, but refused for Norfolk Street.

No further mention of Edwin has been found so perhaps he and his wife moved away as, in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 26 June 1875, Albert Barber advertised that he had removed from 32 High Street West to 8 Norfolk Street.
Morris's directory of 1878 lists Miss Sarah Ann Purser, milliner and dressmaker, at number 6 and Albert Barber, hairdresser and umbrella maker, at number 8. This is something of a mystery as that is the only record found of Miss Purser. Could it have been Sarah Ann Shepley operating under an assumed name?

Albert Barber definitely ran his business from number 6 subsequently as he is recorded there in the 1881 and 1891 censuses (listed with his full name, Samuel A. Barber, in 1891) and in directories up to 1891. During 1882 he became agent for Electrozone Curative Magnetic Appliances which contained "more curative magnetic power than any other". In both census records, Elizabeth McDonnald Elliott is listed as a servant. She and Albert married at Old Glossop Wesleyan Chapel on 12 August 1891.

Perhaps the marriage precipitated retirement as the business was taken over by Solomon Page, who is listed in the Post Office (as Samuel) and Bulmer's directories of 1895. Solomon was destined to be there for the rest of his life, even though it appears he may not have wanted to be at times. From October 1907 until it closed in 1909, he was also licensee of the Talbot Inn on Hall Street. In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 3 February 1911 he advertised the business for sale - “Hairdressing and umbrella business for sale, doing nice trade. Good living accommodation.” but it obviously did not sell as he continued in business at number 6. Kelly's directory of 1928 also lists Solomon's daughter, Gladys, as a ladies’ hairdresser. Solomon had retired by 1939, when the Register shows him still in residence at number 6 with Gladys and her younger sister, Annie. He died on 13 August 1940. Just a few months later, Gladys fell ill and died on 8 July 1941.

8 Norfolk Street.

The occupiers at the time of the 1881 census were William Downing, who was running a Tea & Coffee business from the shop, together with his wife Emma and daughter Mary. The business was to remain in that name until 1900, though the 1891 census records Elizabeth Downing as a shopwoman in a tea shop there, with her son Robert. She appears to have been William's sister in law, wife of his younger brother Edward.

The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 11 May 1900 ran an advertisement for the First-Hand Tea Stores (late W. Downing). The business did not last long under that name as, in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 2 May 1902, Septimus Shoebridge announced that he had taken over the tea and coffee business lately carried on by Mr J. Robinson as First-Hand Tea Stores at 8 Norfolk Street. He would continue to carry on the business and intended opening a Hat and Cap Department at the same address.
Some two months earlier (Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter 7 February 1902) Miss C. Robinson announced that she had commenced dressmaking (on the Scientific System) at 8 Norfolk Street. In the 1901 census number 8 was unoccupied but James Robinson, the painter at 2 & 4 Norfolk Street had daughters Edith who was a tea shop assistant and Elizabeth, a dressmaker. Could they have been the people behind the First-Hand Tea Stores?

“Miss C. Robinson” continued to advertise until 30 May, when the advertisements ceased. The last advert found for the First-Hand Tea Stores was in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 15 August 1902 and Shoebridge then appears to have concentrated on hats, gloves, neckwear, shirts &c.
As documented above, Shoebridge moved to larger premises at number 4, opening on 5 February 1904, selling hats.

An advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 11 May 1906 announced that John Taylor, Hosier & smallware dealer, would open the shop at 8 Norfolk Street. This was another short-lived business as Miss Alice Armitage announced in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 28 December 1906 that she had taken over the fancy drapery business at 8 Norfolk Street, lately carried on by Miss Taylor. The business was advertised for sale in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 27 January 1911, because the family intended leaving the town, but the census, taken on 2 April, recorded Alice with her widowed mother Martha and brother John.

8 Norfolk Street
Advertisement for Ernest Batty, 1928.

They must have sold the business fairly soon afterwards because it is recorded as the studio of Ernest Battey, photographer, in Kelly's directory of 1912.
The same business was there in Kelly's directories of 1925 and 1928 but the directories of 1932, 1936 and 1941 list Harold Robinson, plumber, as does the 1939 register.

10 Norfolk Street.

Nothing was found in any of the source documents for this address. It appears that what started out as number 8 has been split into two properties.

12 to 16 Norfolk Street.

These properties were some of the first to be built, by Joseph Robinson (see The Robinsons of Gnat Hole). The dwellings on Robinson's Court behind the shops were built at the same time. Numbers 12 and 14 were initially designed to be used together to provide the shop for Joseph's business and living accommodation for his family. Number 16 was always separately let out.

Joseph Robinson is listed in Pigot's directory of 1835 as a Linen Draper at Howard’s town. He ran the business for over 35 years before handing it over to his son, Walter, on 1 July 1871. The business continued to thrive until Walter Robinson died suddenly, on 1 September 1900, of a heart attack. Walter's widow, Hannah, was still occupying numbers 12 and 14 at the time of the 1901 census but the business had been closed and she was in the process of selling up. It was then that 12 and 14 started to be used separately.

12 Norfolk Street.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 8 August 1902, Amelia Hadfield of Bridge End House, Victoria Street (see Early occupants of the north end of Victoria Street, Glossop; Jackson's Buildings and its predecessors.), gave notice that she was going to apply at the General Annual Licensing Meeting on 25 August for a licence to sell sweets (British wines) at 12 Norfolk Street, which she owned and occupied as a shop and dwelling house. She undertook to keep the premises closed the whole of Sunday. She also opened a restaurant (sometimes described as refreshment rooms in newspaper reports) in the property .

12 Norfolk Street
12 Norfolk Street during the time that Bowdens ran it.

The 1911 census lists Amelia Hadfield, Confectioner, as head of the household with her sister Grace Bowden as assistant and Grace's husband, John Thomas Bowden, who was a cotton spinner. Grace and John's daughters, Amy and Amelia Bowden, assisted in the business.

Amelia Hadfield must have retired by 1925 as John Thomas Bowden is listed as running the shop in Kelly's directories of 1925, 1928 and 1932. The Bowden family named the building Crescent House.
Amelia Hadfield died on 10 January 1936.

12 Norfolk Street
Advertisement for Bowden's Cafe, 1928.

Kelly's directories of 1936 and 1941 list Mitchell & Davis as the cafe owners. They were the Bowden sisters, Amy (who had married Albert Mitchell in 1921) and Amelia (who had married Abraham Davis in 1928). Amelia and Abraham were living at number 12 in 1939 whilst Amy and Albert were living at 15 Lord Street.

14 Norfolk Street.

It appears that the shop became a shoe shop once used independently. The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 23 February 1906 carried an advertisement from a Robert Wilson, apologising for the shop at 14 Norfolk Street being closed recently due to illness making it unavoidable. The shop had reopened and an entirely new stock of boots and shoes. The business seems to have failed though as the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 25 May 1906 carried an advertisement from Amelia Hadfield that the shop was to let with immediate possession. The advertisement also stated that a large plate glass window had recently been fitted. It was possibly the one which had been broken on 4 May 1905 when a frightened horse backed a trap into it.

Kelly's directory of 1908 listed Ernest Chapman, hairdresser, at number 14 and an advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 29 May 1908 for “Hairforall, The universal hair tonic” mentioned that it could be obtained at Chapman's, hairdresser of Norfolk Street. The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 3 September 1909 reported that Ernest Chapman was emigrating to New Zealand on the 17th, and Kelly's directory of 1912 lists Arthur Philip Chapman at number 14. In the 1911 census, Arthur and his brother Albert (living with their widowed mother and younger brother at 187 High Street East) were both listed as hairdressers. Kelly's directories of 1925 and 1928 list Chapman Brothers but the 1932 directory lists Arthur Chapman alone.

14 Norfolk Street
14 Norfolk Street, Chapman Brothers.

Kelly's directory of 1936 lists Hilda Ainsworth, milliner, at number 14. In the 1941 directory she was Mrs. Hilda Darlington (having married Eric Bruce Darlington in 1938) and the shop was named Vogue.

16 Norfolk Street.

At the time of the 1841 census the property was occupied by the family of Joseph Hadfield, a mechanic (see The descendants of James Goddard of Waterside).
At the time of the 1851 census Joseph had retired. The shop was run by his son, also Joseph, a greengrocer. Joseph spent all of his working life in the business, retiring only as a result of ill health in 1901. He died on 6 May 1903.

The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 7 April 1905 listed Fred Bradbury as a Greengrocer at 16 Norfolk Street. He didn't stay long as, in the newspaper of 4 August 1905, he announced his move to 37 High Street West.

16 Norfolk Street
Advertisement for Fred Bradbury, 1904.

The shop was taken over by H. Carlton, High-class tailor (trading name of Hyman Bernstein of Manchester) but that occupancy didn't last all that long.

Joseph Edward Robinson advertised a Christmas attraction of Glass, china and earthenware in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 20 December 1907. Joseph, who was also a semi-professional singer using the stage name Sidney Clifford only lasted a couple of years. An advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 19 November 1909 announced that, on 29 November at 16 Norfolk Street, Mr. J. T. Goddard would sell by auction surplus stock of China, vases, glass &c. Joseph didn't leave immediately as he placed an advertisement for Sidney Clifford, Bass Vocalist, in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 11 February 1910. He had moved to 21 High Street East by the time of the 1911 census.

The shop was taken on by William Pott. He was described in the 1911 census as a Tobacconist & general dealer but by the time of Kelly's directory of 1912 he had become a chipped potato dealer. The chip shop was advertised for sale in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 24 September 1915. No record of who took it on immediately has been found but Kelly's directory of 1928 listed Robert Bartholomew running a fried fish shop at number 16. The directory of 1932 listed Harry Burford whilst those of 1936 and 1941 listed Mrs. Annie Sheppard. In the 1939 register the shop was occupied by Thomas and Annie Sheppard (both Fish & Chip Fryers), their son James and a shop assistant named Gladys Jepson.

18-26 Norfolk Street.

In his Local Events of the Past column in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 1 October 1909, Robert Hamnett mentioned September 29th 1838 as the date on which Jonathan Bowden leased the land to build 18-26 Norfolk Street. At the time the land was a meadow occupied by Joseph Oates bounded on the north by an intended street (which became Station Street). Number 26 was licensed as a beerhouse (eventually the Railway Inn).

It is difficult to tell exactly which of the properties were occupied at the time of the 1841 census as the entries for several roads are simply recorded as Howard Town. It also appears that the enumerator did not record people sequentially as the entries for premises where certain families are known to have been do not follow the expected walking order. The entry for the family of Jonathan Bowden, joiner, (wife Martha and sons John and Joseph) must be one of the properties in this block and it is likely that William Tranmer, brewer, was the occupant of number 26 with his wife Hannah and daughter Mary.

In the 1851 census, Jonathan Bowden, joiner, is listed with wife Ruth and sons John and Joseph at Howard Town. Martha had died in 1843 and Jonathan had remarried to Ruth Handford in 1844 at Stockport.

The premises were sold to Glossop Conservative Club on 26 April 1876. The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 29 April 1876 reported “Some weeks ago we announced that the members of the Glossop Conservative Club intended to establish themselves in some more prominent place than Surrey Street. On Wednesday they secured for £1,400 the beerhouse known as the Railway Hotel, opposite the railway station, and the four cottages adjoining. The premises are to be altered to meet all the requirements of the club as soon as possible. Mr. William Newton, the present tenant, intends asking the bench to transfer the licence to the defunct Lamb Inn or any other premises to which he may remove, and as this proposal would involve no increase in the number of licensed houses, no serious objection is likely to be raised to it. At all events, the magistrates on the bench on Thursday, to whom he applied, thought the proposal only fair and reasonable, though at present premature.”.

18 Norfolk Street.

The first definite record found is in the 1871 census when the occupants were the family of Josiah Jackson, Blacksmith.

18 Norfolk Street
Advertisement for Glossop Chronicle, 1901.

After the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter was sold to “a Company of Conservative Gentlemen”, preparations were made to move its office and printing facility to 18 Norfolk Street. The office opened in February 1877 with publication under the new management complete by 21 April. The various directories list the Glossop Dale Chronicle & North Derbyshire Reporter and Glossop Dale Chronicle Printing & Publishing Company Limited there until production moved to Howard Chambers in 1921 (see Glossop's Early Local Newspapers.).

Kelly's directory of 1925 lists the occupant as Hyman Goldstone, a house furnisher.

The premises subsequently became home to a succession of ladies' hairdressing businesses. Kelly's directory of 1928 lists Mrs Doris Bowers. She moved to Victoria Street and the occupant in the 1932 directory was Mrs Agnes Rowbottom. She was followed by Miss Nellie Rowbottom (relationship not established) in 1936. The directory of 1941 lists Miss Marion Oldham, daughter of the Conservative Club steward and stewardess, with whom she was recorded in the 1939 register.

18 Norfolk Street
Advertisement for Doris Bowers, 1928.

20 Norfolk Street.

Edmund Lamb, a railway porter, and his wife Mary were running a stationery business a number 20 in 1868. Mary was the daughter of Thomas and Ellen Hadfield (see Hadfields of Willow Grove). They were still there at the time of the 1871 census but left some time within the next year or so as the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 19 October 1872 carried an advertisement for George Burgess, confectioner, at 20 Norfolk Street.

Morris's directory of 1878 lists James Fielding, fruiterer, who is described as a grocer in the censuses of 1881 and 1891. He was born in 1824, the son of Samuel and Nancy Fielding (see Descendants of John Fielding of Whitfield 1674). The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 14 September 1894 carried a Notice of an auction of household furniture on behalf of Mr James Fielding, 20 Norfolk Street.

James was succeeded by his son, William Walton Fielding, who is listed as a shopkeeper in the Post Office directory of 1895 and subsequent directories up to Kelly's of 1912. During his time at the shop, William also became a tobacconist. He was succeeded by his daughter, Alice Etchells, who is listed in Kelly's directories of 1925, 1928, 1932 and 1936.

Alice retired and the business was taken over by William Nesbitt Bowden, who is listed in Kelly's directory of 1941 and was living at number 20 with his wife and daughter when the 1939 register was compiled.

22 Norfolk Street.

The 1871 census lists George Burgess, a foreman, with his wife Asenath and a lodger, William Chatterton. This could well be the same people with the confectionery business at number 20 in 1872.

The residents in 1881 were three unmarried sisters - Julia, Sarah Ann and Victoria Bridge who originally came from Compstall. Also living there were two nephews (James and Wright) and a niece (Julia Ann). Sarah Ann Bridge died at 22 Norfolk Street on 17 March 1883, aged 46. In the 1891 census Julia and Victoria are still living there as are Julia Ann and Wright, plus another nephew, Thomas.

It looks like number 22 may have subsequently had rooms let out as offices. The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 17 June 1892 carried an advertisement placed by F. W. G. Moran, Solicitor. Frederick William Grace Moran was in partnership with Francis Knowles in Howard Street in 1895/1896 when it was advertised that he had withdrawn from the business. The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 6 April 1900 reported that F. W. G. Moran of Norfolk Street had been appointed as Superintendent Registrar in place of the late Mr. J. W. Tweedale. The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 25 May 1900 carried an advertisement that two ground floor rooms in Norfolk Street, lately occupied by Mr. F. W. G. Moran, solicitor, were to let (application to be made to 6 Market Street). It looks like Moran may have reverted to 22 Norfolk Street when he left the partnership with Knowles until moving to 6 Market Street (see Market Street, Glossop, The First Hundred Years.).

The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 28 December 1894 published an advertisement placed by Mr Herbert Bates, auctioneer, 22 Norfolk Street and that of 22 March 1895 published an advertisement for Glossop Cricket Club which gave a contact of Thos. R. Howarth, 22 Norfolk Street. The Post Office directory of 1895 lists Bates & Howarth, auctioneers, at number 22 .

A report in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 2 August 1901 urged people to register on the Burgess List and mentioned Robert Hamnett, 22 Norfolk Street, as a sub-registration agent. Two weeks earlier a report referred to the Central Registration Office, 22 Norfolk Street.

Kelly's directory of 1908 listed the Conservative Registration Office (High Peak division) (E. S. Lawrence, registration agent) at 22 Norfolk Street.

24 Norfolk Street.

The 1871 census lists George Knott, a Cotton weaver, with his family.

A report on revision of the Burgess List in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 9 October 1875 included the fact that Charles Newton's address was altered from 20 to 24. Charles, the son of William Newton, then licensee of the Railway Inn, is listed with his family at number 24 in the 1881 census.

The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 6 March 1886 published a letter from a J. D. Wilde with address 24 Norfolk Street. On 21 May the following year the paper reported that Mr. Joseph David Wilde (age 32) of 24 Norfolk Street had been killed by a bale of cloth falling on him while passing along a narrow street in Manchester.

A report in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 11 March 1892 mentions Robert Hamnett, 24 Norfolk Street, as being steward of the Conservative Club. Just over seven years later (July 1899, the Glossop & District Antiquarian and Natural History Society was formed by the local committee appointed to carry out excavations at Melandra Castle. Mr Robert Hamnett, 24 Norfolk Street, was named as secretary.

26 Norfolk Street.

The Post Office directory of 1855 listed Joseph Bowden (younger son of Jonathan and Martha) as a smallware dealer in Norfolk Street.

In a number of advertisements in the Glossop Record starting 18 July 1861, Bradley & Co, brewers at the Soho Brewery in Sheffield, announced that they had appointed Mr John S. Bowden (elder son of Jonathan and Martha) of Norfolk Street as agent for the sale of their Pale, Mild and Strong Ales and Porters. White's directory of 1862 lists John S. Bowden as having a beerhouse. It is not clear whether these relate to the Railway Inn or the Star Inn (where John was living at the time of the 1861 census, see Howard Street, Glossop, the first hundred years (approx).)

In an advertisement in the Glossop Record of 18 April 1863, John Lewis announced that he had removed his business as a Licensed Auctioneer, General Valuer and Estate Agent to the Railway Hotel, Norfolk Street. By 7 September 1867, John Lewis had moved to Howard Street.

The Glossop Record of 21 October 1865 carried an advertisement “To be let with immediate possession, that well-accustomed Railway Hotel, situate opposite the Glossop Railway Station, together with a four horse stable. Apply J. Bowden, on the premises.”. The inn was leased by William Newton, the Glossop Record of 17 November 1866 reporting that the closing dinner of the Glossop Royal Oak Cricket Club was “held at the house of Mr William Newton, Railway Hotel” on 10 November. William Newton remained as licensee until 1876 when, as noted above, the whole block of properties was bought by the members of the Glossop Conservative Club.

A report in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 27 May 1876 stated “The New Conservative Club Premises - The shares might have been, we understand, fully taken up in this undertaking on Wednesday night, but the committee thought it prudent to reserve a few for small subscribers, and some of the larger subscribers were put at a lesser figure to enable this to be done. Mr. Newton the present tenant of the Railway Inn is naturally anxious to secure another house, and on Monday applied through Mr. Lord to the Bench to renew the licence of the Lamb Inn, which, it was stated, was suspended for two years about 1870, and no application for renewal has been made from that time. The clerk advised the Bench that the application could only be made at the Annual Licensing Court in August, and Mr. Lord admitted this; the bench expressed no opinion upon the merits of the application. We are told that the license in connection with the Railway Hotel will be retained by the Conservative Club, not for use, but that the property may not lose in value should it be necessary again to place it in the market.”. William Newton applied for a licence for the former Lamb Inn at the Brewster Sessions on 28 August but was unsuccessful as it would mean there being an additional licence in the town.

The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 1 January 1881 carried an advertisement for a man and wife without family as manager of the Conservative Rooms, contact Mr. W. Sheppard (who was the secretary). In the event, the absence of a family proved unimportant as the 1881 census records that George Brownhill was Manager Conservative Rooms and was living there with his wife Elizabeth and two year old daughter Alice. They only stayed a couple of years as the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 26 May 1883 reported that the management committee of the Conservative Club met to elect a manager to succeed George Brownhill who had moved to the Drover's Arms at Charlestown. Lewis Wooliscroft of Charlesworth, employed for 20 years at Dinting Vale Printworks, was chosen.

The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 29 August 1890 reported that the Conservative Club applied for the licence to be transferred to Mr Lewis Wooliscroft from Mr George Newton, who had died. It appears that George may have been the brother of William Newton (at 70 years old when he died he was too old to be William's son), and presumably obtained the licence when William died.

Lewis Wooliscroft moved to the Britannia Inn in 1891 and Robert Hamnett took up the position of steward, staying until 1901. The Conservative Club advertised for a steward and wife (Applications to W. H. Darwent by 24 June 1901) in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 14 June. At the Glossop Borough Police Court on 8 July, F. W. G. Moran applied on behalf of James Hadfield of the Railway Inn, Norfolk Street (the Conservative Club) for temporary authority to sell until the next transfer day. Mr. Hadfield was in possession of the premises lately occupied by Mr Robert Hamnett, who held the licence. The application was granted. The licence was fully transferred on 22 July.

22-26 Norfolk Street (New Conservative Club).

18-26 Norfolk Street
The Conservative club during rebuilding, 1909, with numbers 20 and 18 to the right.

A Grand Farewell Party was held at the Conservative Club on 2 January 1909, before it was demolished and rebuilt. The formal opening of the new Conservative Club by the Duke of Devonshire took place on 23 July 1910. James Hadfield remained as steward, being recorded in the 1911 census with his family.

18-26 Norfolk Street
The new Conservative club, 1910, with refurbished numbers 20 and 18 to the right.

Kelly's directories from 1912 to 1941 list number 22 variously as the address of the Conservative Registration Office (High Peak division); Conservative & Unionist Association (High Peak division); Glossop Conservative Club and Glossop Women’s Unionist Association.

In the 1939 register Alfred Oldham, Steward, and his family were recorded at the Conservative Club.

28 Norfolk Street.

The first resident identified, in the 1851 census, is William Wardlow Howard, General practitioner (see The Howards of Ludworth and Bridgefield). He was there until he died on 13 December 1879. The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 10 January 1880 published an advertisement from John Ford for an auction of all contents of 28 Norfolk Street on behalf of the executors of the late Dr. W. W. Howard.

Two weeks later the newspaper reported that 28 Norfolk Street (together with 3 Station Street and the goodwill of the practice) was sold at auction to W. H. Hunt for £1,325. William Henry Hunt was also a physician & surgeon. He became medical officer & public vaccinator for Glossop district, and medical officer to the workhouse but died at the age of only 44 on 12 January 1892.

The practice was bought by Robert Nelson who we first find in the Post Office directory of 1895. By the time of Kelly's directory of 1908 he had been joined by Thomas Mayne Reid Waddell.
Waddell later started his own practice, being found at 25 Victoria Street in Kelly's directory of 1925. He then became ill and died on 19 May 1926 aged only 44.
Robert Nelson continued the practice until he died at the age of 71 on 27 November 1932. His wife, Jessie, continued to live at number 28, being recorded there in the 1939 register, before moving further up Norfolk Street to Manor Crest. She died aged 87 on 17 September 1957.
Kelly's directory of 1941 lists Peter Edwin Malloch who had previously practiced with Dr. Walker in High Street West. He was at number 28 until he died on 28 January 1966.

30 Norfolk Street.

John Isherwood, cotton dresser, is recorded with his wife Mary and their family in the 1841 census. By the time of Slater's directory of 1850 he had become a painter, plumber & glazier. By the time of the 1851 census, their daughter Mary Ann was working from home as a dressmaker. Both John and Mary Ann are listed in the directories of the 1850s and the 1861 census.
Mary Isherwood died aged 61 in October 1861 and John died aged 62 in 1865.

In the Glossop Record of 15 July 1865, William Bradbury, Painter & Glazier, Norfolk Street, announced that he had taken the workshop lately occupied by the late John Isherwood, opposite the Railway Station, Norfolk Street, where he would continue his 23 year old business. He is listed there in Harrod's directory of 1870 but moved to 11 Henry Street in 1870/1 (see The Early Development of Shops and Businesses of Norfolk Square and Henry Street, Glossop.)

The only entry in the 1871 census for number 30 is for a lodger named Joseph Higginbottom, unemployed draper. The entry is out of order so he may well have actually been living at number 32 with his brother Tom, who transferred the license to him later that year.

32 Norfolk Street (Station Hotel).

The first mentions in directories are Bagshaw's of 1846 and Slater's of 1850 when John Higginbottom is listed at the Station Inn. The Inn had reputedly been built by a Joseph Higginbottom in 1836. He may have been John's older brother (1794-1872). In the 1851 census, John Higginbottom was recorded as a farmer of 8 acres employing a labourer, rather than an innkeeper or beerseller. His wife, Ann (née Harrison), was described as a farmer's wife and children Thomas, Joseph and Mariah were all scholars. In the Post Office directory of 1855 and White's of 1857 the pub was listed as the Station Inn & Railway Hotel, with John still in charge. John Higginbottom died on 27 October 1857, aged 47.

Ann Higginbottom took over and is recorded as a victualler at the Station Inn in the 1861 census. Tom, a stock keeper in a calico warehouse, and Maria, a barmaid, were living with her but Joseph appears to have been away at school in Ashton under Lyne. Ann Higginbottom married Charles Hadfield, a publican on 23 January 1862 at Manchester Cathedral and he took over the licence.

Charles Hadfield (see The Hadfield family of Cowbrook) was licensee of the Hare & Hounds at Old Glossop, built by his father, Joseph. In between Joseph leaving that pub in 1843 and Charles taking it over in 1848, it had been run by John and Thomas Higginbottom. In the 1841 census, Ann Harrison was a servant at the Hare & Hounds; she married John Higginbottom at Glossop Parish Church on 2 May 1843.

The Glossop Record of 9 March 1867 published an advertisement for an auction on 25 March of “All that well-accustomed inn, known as the Station Inn, and Vaults, situate in Norfolk Street, in Glossop, and opposite to the Railway Station there, with yards, stables, outbuildings, and appurtenances. Also all that messuage at the northerly end thereof, now occupied by Mrs Emma Hadfield; and all that other messuage and shop, now occupied by Mrs. Hannah Didsbury. Also twelve cottages occupied by William Lomas, James Brady, Thomas Devlin, Lavinia Mason, John Booth, Samuel Turner and James Charlesworth and others. And all that other cottage now occupied as a workshop by Mr. John Willey.”. Emma Hadfield has not been identified, perhaps it was an error and should have been Ann.
It appears that the family had second thoughts, or something happened to change their minds, as the Glossop Record of 23 March advertised that the auction had been postponed until 15 April and the issue of 13 April 1867 stated that the sale had been postponed until further notice.

The Glossop Record of 7 December 1867 reported that the licence of the Station Inn had been transferred from Charles Hadfield (who had moved to 38 Norfolk Street) to Tom Higginbottom on 5 December. Tom was listed in Harrod's directory of 1870 at the Station Inn, wine and spirit vaults, and as a licensed victualler in the 1871 census. Tom's sister, Maria was also recorded, as a barmaid.

The Hyde & Glossop Weekly News, and North Cheshire Herald of 7 October 1871 reported that the license of the Station Inn had transferred from Thomas Higginbottom (who had become an auctioneer) to his brother Joseph on 2 October. Joseph died, aged only 24, on 14 April 1872. The licence passed to Maria but she decided to sell up two years later. The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter 25 April 1874 published an advertisement for the sale by auction on 4 May of the Station Inn (Miss Maria Higginbottom owner) and the cottage next adjoining in the occupation of Mr Thomas Dudsbury as tenant (despite him having died in 1866).

32 Norfolk Street
Advertisement for Abel Harrison & the Station Hotel, 1878.

The inn was bought by Abel Harrison, who was also a coal merchant. The entry in Kelly's directory of 1881 also described him as a mineral water manufacturer. Abel stayed until 1889 when he retired. The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 19 September 1890 published a notice that Abel Harrison, Mineral water manufacturer, Simmondley Springs, had removed his office from Norfolk Street to 13 & 15 Railway Street.

Abel Harrison was replaced by Thomas Sturgeon, who stayed until 1894 when Henry Bagshaw became licensee. The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 2 December 1898 reported on proposed alterations to the Station Hotel. This included doing away with the urinal leading from Norfolk Street into Ellison Street, taking down the old ashpits and putting up better buildings with the urinal placed inside. Permission for the alterations was granted as it would remove a nuisance. It appears that the alterations may have involved incorporating number 30 into the main building as the 1901 census entry for Henry Bagshaw and his family is recorded as number 30.

The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 9 January 1903 reported the granting of the transfer of the licence for the Station Hotel to Edward Taylor He died aged 43 on 5 November 1909 and the license was taken over by his widow, Elizabeth. She was followed by William Ross, who is mentioned in a report in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 3 December 1915. Kelly's directory of 1925 lists William Irving Elliott whilst those of 1928 and 1932 list Edwin Owen Barber. Despite the similar names he seems to have been no relation to the hairdressing family.

Kelly's directories of 1936 and 1941 list Thomas Howarth as licensee. He was also recorded there, with his family, in the 1939 register.

34 Norfolk Street.

The spelling of the surname of the first identified occupants of this property varies widely. The 1841 census records Thomas Tidsbury, a coachman, with his wife Hannah. In the 1851 census their surname is spelled Tudesberry. The Post Office directory of 1855 lists Mrs. Hannah Tudsbery as running tea, coffee & refreshment rooms. In the 1861 census we find Thomas Dudsbry, Keeper of refreshment rooms formerly stage coachman and Hannah, formerly domestic cook. White's directory of 1862 listed Thomas Dudsberry as a shopkeeper. Thomas died in 1866 but Hannah remained. When the property was meant to be auctioned in 1867 her name was was given as Mrs Hannah Didsbury but when the Glossop Record of 16 January 1869 reported a theft from her pie shop the name was spelled Dudsbury. In the 1871 census, Hannah Didsbury is recorded as running a Sweetmate shop. Hannah died in 1875.

The occupants at the time of the 1881 census were the family of James Brown, a railway porter. The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 6 November 1886 reported that James Brown of 34 Norfolk Street had died aged 52.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 30 January 1891, Thomas Bloomfield Secker, ophthalmic optician, announced that he was opening a branch at Mr Julien Mitchell's, Surgeon Dentist, 34 Norfolk Street. Julien Mitchell, who had a son of the same name who went on to become a famous actor, is recorded at number 35 Norfolk Street in the census of 1891.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 12 May 1899, Edwin Collier, Auctioneer, Valuer, General Commission and Estate Agent gave notice that he had taken offices at 34 Norfolk street. The entry in Kelly's directory of 1908, described Edwin Collier as an auctioneer & valuer & certified bailiff under the “Law of Distress Amendment Act”. An announcement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 4 June 1909 stated that Edwin Collier had taken rooms adjacent to his offices where furniture and other goods could be stored for sale. Presumably that was in number 36. The final directory entry for Edwin Collier is in Kelly's of 1925. He died on 11 February 1931 aged 65.

There is no entry in Kelly's directories of 1928 or 1932 for number 34 but those of 1936 and 1941 list the Spread Eagle Building Society (Jas. Edwin Hall, secretary).

36 Norfolk Street.

The order of entries in the 1861 census suggests that the property was occupied by the family of John W. G. Willey, Cabinet maker. This may well be the property he was using as a workshop, which was mentioned in the Station Hotel auction notice of 9 March 1867. By 1871 census the family was across the road at number 17.

38 Norfolk Street.

At the time of the 1861 census the property appears to have been occupied by the family of John Bingham, Hay dealer and greengrocer.

As we have seen above, Charles Hadfield moved to number 38 after giving up the licence of the Station Hotel. In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 25 March 1871, Charles Hadfield of 38 Norfolk Street gave notice (dated the 24th) that he would not be responsible for any debt or debts contracted by his wife Ann Hadfield. At the time of the 1871 census Charles Hadfield, farmer of about 20 acres, was living at number 38 with his children but no sign of Ann. Charles died in 1877.

36 & 38 Norfolk Street.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 18 November 1876, Joseph Coe, dentist, advertised that he had moved from 3 Fitzalan Street to 36 & 38 Norfolk Street. He was recorded there with his family in the 1881 census but the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 20 August 1881 reported that he had died, aged just 29, on 14 August.

The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 3 June 1890 published the first of a series of advertisements by “JL” of the Private Loan Office, 38 Norfolk Street, offering loans from £2 to £200 to Farmers, Cow-keepers and respectable Householders. “JL” may well have been John Lever (see number 40 below).

The 1891 census records the family of Thomas Bramwell, general labourer, with a lodger. The listing in Kelly's directory of that year describes Thomas as a shopkeeper. He had been a confectioner at High Street West in 1881 and his daughter was a confectioner so that is possibly the business he was in. In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 20 November 1891, Mr Smith of 16 Chapel Street, Hyde, advertised that he effectually cured ruptures and that he attended every Monday, from 3 to 7:30 at Mr Thomas Bramwell's, 36 and 38 Norfolk Street; Mrs Smith will attend to ladies.
Bulmer's directory of 1895 listed Mrs. M. A. Bramwell, shopkeeper, at 36-38.

Directories in 1895, 1899 and 1900 list Alfred Ernest Schofield, printer & stationer at 36 & 38 (see The Early Development of Shops and Businesses of Norfolk Square and Henry Street, Glossop.) and the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter 22 June 1900 advertised that “The News and Stationery business lately carried on by the Misses Schofield, 6 Norfolk Square, will henceforth be conducted by A. E. Schofield, 36 Norfolk Street.”. In the 1901 census, Alfred is recorded there with his family.

Within a couple of years, Alfred had gone into partnership with Thomas Grant, as Schofield & Grant. Thomas, together with his family, was recorded at number 38 in the 1911 census. Alfred had retired some years earlier and was living in Chester in 1911. Thomas ran the business until 1921(though he had moved the business to Market Street by that time) when he participated in the formation of Glossop Printers Ltd. (see Glossop's Early Local Newspapers.).

The High Peak Division Liberal Association (with different secretaries) is listed in Kelly's directories of 1925, 1928, 1932, 1936 and 1941. In 1925 and 1928, number 38 was also the address of the High Peak Land & Building Co. Limited (E. Farrington, secretary).

The occupants recorded in the 1939 register were George Bancroft, Precision & Press Tool & Gauge; Bancroft Bros. Toolmakers and his wife Ruth.

40 Norfolk Street (Holly Bank).

White's directory of 1857 lists Charles John Hadfield, surveyor to Lord Edward G. F. Howard, and manager of the Water-works (see Hadfields of Lees Hall). The censuses of 1861, 1871 and 1881 all record him there with his family. Charles John Hadfield died on 17 November 1881 and his wife, Frances, moved to Chorlton on Medlock, where she is found with some of their children in the 1891 census.

An advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 21 October 1882 advised that John Ford would sell by auction, on 6 November, the residence of the late Mr. Charles John Hadfield at the Junction of Norfolk Street and Ellison Street (Dwelling house with office fronting Norfolk Street; office with a separate entrance to Norfolk Street). The property didn't sell as it was advertised in the newspaper on 17 February 1883 as “to be sold with vacant possession on 25 March or to be let the residence and offices of the late Mr Charles John Hadfield”. John Ford advertised in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 10 March 1883 that he would auction the household furniture on 19 March 1883.

A further attempt was made to auction the house off on 12 November 1883 but it obviously still didn't sell as Mrs. Sarah Hadfield, wife of Matthew Ellison Hadfield (brother of Charles John and architect of Glossop Town Hall and other buildings) moved in after he died on 9 March 1885. In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 15 August 1885, John Ford advertised that he would sell by auction on 20 August a quantity of surplus furniture at the house belonging to Mrs Hadfield, Norfolk Street.

Sarah Hadfield was recorded at number 40 in the 1891 census, aged 78 and living on her own means with two maids. It appears that part of the property had been let as the census (and Kelly's directories of 1888 and 1891) list Mrs Mary Stead, a milliner and dressmaker at 40a Norfolk Street.

The dual use of the property became permanent with the dwelling, Holly Mount (residence of Isaac and Harriett Jackson and their family) being given an address of Ellison Street and number 40 being the office premises fronting Norfolk Street. These latter premises were used by Isaac Jackson until he moved the business to Hawkshead Mill, and by various other people as noted below.

Bulmer's directory of 1895 lists Robert George Hawke, architect and surveyor, at number 40. The Post Office directory of the same year just gives his address as Norfolk Street

It was suggested, in 1898, that the Post Office be moved to Jackson's buildings in Norfolk Street. This was 40 Norfolk Street, not those in Victoria Street which hadn't been erected at the time. There were multiple objections and it took several months to resolve the matter and leave the Post Office in Norfolk Square.

Advertisements for several businesses were published in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter in the next few years:
On 24 October 1902, W. T. Hurst advertised that he had started the business of a Commission Agent at 40 Norfolk Street.
On 23 October 1903 the paper carried two advertisements for a business for sale placed by J. W. Smith & Co., estate agents Jackson's Buildings, Norfolk Street.
On 1 February 1907, John Lever (possibly the mysterious “JL” noted previously at number 38) advertised loans available, giving his address as 40 Norfolk Street (Manager Frank Ainsworth). The newspaper of 18 June 1909 carried a notice that the old established business of John Lever had been transferred to 13 Norfolk Street.

Kelly's directory of 1912 listed Edward Darlington, income tax collector, at number 40; several advertisements were published in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter in 1915 from Darlington & son, Estate and Commission agents, 40 Norfolk Street and Kelly's directory of 1925 listed John W. Darlington, assessor & collector of taxes, there.

Kelly's directories of 1928 to 1941 listed Ernest Robert Taylor, dental surgeon at number 40.



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Last updated: 23 February 2022