Howard Street, Glossop, the first hundred years (approx).

It appears that the early years of Howard Street saw many of the premises being a mixture of residential and business use. In a number of cases it looks like businesses were carried out either in workshops at the rear of properties or in a room dedicated for office use.

The early censuses do not show specific addresses. Those of 1841 and 1851 simply refer to Howardtown whilst that of 1861 lists 18 families in Howard Street but gives no house numbers. The first census to record house numbers was 1871 but it lists only six households in Howard Street. It also lists numbers 32-38 which have since been renumbered to numbers 20-26.

The Glossop Record of 13 October 1860 carried an advertisement inviting tenders for the completion of Howard Street, specifications and information being available from Mr Hawke at the Estate Office. The only two properties which can be definitely dated are Howard Chambers (number 6) which has a date stone of 1883 and Fern House (number 38) which has a date stone of 1889.

2 Howard Street

On the corner of Norfolk Street is the Star Inn. It is sometimes referred to as being in Norfolk Street but the correct address is 2 Howard Street. The book History In A Pint Pot tells us that the inn was built in 1837 by Joseph Bowden (born 2 October 1802, died 21 November 1854) who is shown, living there with his wife Ruth and family as a joiner in the 1841 census and a journeyman joiner in the 1851 census. The 1861 census lists John Smith Bowden (son of Joseph's brother Jonathan of the Railway Inn) as a joiner and beerseller who was also the son-in-law of Ruth, having married her daughter Sarah, his cousin, on 17 September 1855 at St Peter's church, Ashton Under Lyne.
John Hobson (licensee of the Star from 1869 to 1878) is listed in the 1871 census as a beer seller at 3 Talbot Street.
The 1881 census lists Joe Orme, publican at No 2 Howard Street.
In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 22 March 1884, Joe Orme advertised his Hay & Straw business, having taken over the sheds lately occupied by Alfred Rowbottom, stone cutter. Alfred Rowbottom had been listed (and advertised) in Morris's Directory of 1878 as a stone and marble mason of Howard Street but with no number given. Presumably the sheds referred to were between Howard Street and Charles Street.

Alfred Rowbottom advert 1878 directory
Alfred Rowbottom advert 1878 directory.


The 1891 census lists Joe Orme as a beerseller at the Star Inn with an address of 3 Norfolk Street. Bulmer's directory of 1895 lists him as a beerseller in Howard Street, even though he died in November 1894, not long after he had applied for a licence extension.

Joe Orme advert in Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter 3 August 1894
Joe Orme advert in Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter 3 August 1894.


The Post Office Directory of 1895 correctly lists Charles Wood (who took over the licence) as a beer retailer, but with an address of 3 Norfolk Street again.
In January 1895, the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter carried a notice from Moran & Knowles, Howard Chambers, Howard Street advising that the Business of Hay & Straw Dealer carried on by the late Joe Orme at the Star Inn was to be sold, and subsequently that it had been transferred to John W. Eversden who would carry on the business from the same premises. John Eversden lasted less than two years in the business as an advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 20 November 1896 said that John T. Goddard had received instructions from J. W. Eversden to sell a shed and equipment connected with the business “at his premises near the Advertiser Office, Howard Street”.

The 1901 census lists Charles Wood as a Public House Keeper at the Star Inn at 2 Howard Street whilst that of 1911 lists Walter Bradbury as a Publican at the Star Inn, Howard Street.

A full list of the licences of The Star Inn can be found in the book History In A Pint Pot.

4 Howard Street

Number 4 was originally a dwelling but it was acquired by Boddingtons (who bought the pub from Ruth Bowden in 1889) and subsequently incorporated into the Star Inn (presumably after 1901 as that is the last time it appears separately in the census).
The censuses list the families of: John Sellars, licensed hawker (1871); George Knott, general labourer (1881); Mary Hanson, widow (1891) and Lily Hanson, cotton weaver and a daughter of Mary (1901).

6 Howard Street (Howard Chambers)

The building bears a date stone of 1883 and has been home to several businesses over the years. Several advertisements in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter from 1883 indicate that the premises were occupied by Francis Charles John Hadfield (son of Charles John Hadfield, see Lees Hall Hadfields), architect & surveyor and secretary to Glossop Agricultural Society. He had also been Actuary to the Glossop Dale Savings Bank since 1881. The AGM of the Bank, held on 10 August 1883 resolved that, when it was completed, the business premises of the bank would be transferred to the new building under construction in Howard Street. F. C. J. Hadfield was mentioned as holding both positions in Kelly's Directory of 1888 and as Actuary of the Savings Bank in 1891. By 1891, F. C. J. Hadfield had relinquished the post of secretary to the Agricultural Society but remained as Actuary/Manager of the Savings Bank until his death in 1894.

Advertisements in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter tell us that John Ford, auctioneer, was working from the building in 1888 & 1889 but he moved to Victoria Street and the paper carried advertisements for Hawke, Hadfield & Gee, auctioneers, in 1890.

In 1889, the paper also carried advertisements for the Richmond Balls signed by Jas. H. Goldsmith, secretary, based at 6 Howard Street.

Kelly's directory of 1891 brought the first mention of a long standing tenant, John Kidd Hollingbery. An auditor & chartered accountant, he was listed as secretary of the Bill Posting & Advertising Co. Limited, Glossop Advertiser Printing & Publishing Co. Limited, Glossop Agricultural Society and Glossop Dale Photographic Society and as agent to the Royal Exchange Assurance Corporation & Royal Fire & Life Assurance Co. He continued to be listed in all the available directories up to Kelly's of 1912.
The 1891 directory also listed Hawke, Hadfield & Gee, auctioneers, Howard chambers, Howard Street.

In December 1891 and January 1892, Francis Bede Ellison, auctioneer, valuer, estate agent and fire & life insurance agent (see Ellisons of Glossop Hall), advertised in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter that he had removed from 23 High Street east to Howard Chambers. The paper subsequently carried advertisements for various auctions during 1892. He succeeded Francis Hadfield as actuary of Glossop Dale Savings Bank. Francis Ellison was succeeded as actuary by Walter Pedley Evason (who was also master of Hague's School at Whitfield), he being listed at Howard Chambers in Kelly's directories of 1899 through to 1912.

In addition to Hollingbery (who had also become secretary of the Glossop Richmond Building Society) and Ellison, the Post Office & Bulmer's directories of 1895 listed Moran & Knowles, solicitors, at Howard Chambers. The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 13 November 1896 carried a notice that the partnership of Frederick William Grace Moran and Francis Gordon Knowles had been dissolved, Moran having withdrawn from the firm. Francis Knowles (who became a councillor in 1901, and subsequently an alderman) is listed at Howard Chambers in Kelly's directories of 1899 and 1900 but then moved to Ellison Street in partnership with Charles Davis. Frederick Moran went into practice on his own, having offices in Norfolk Street and Market Street.

In the early 1900s, Glossop Council opened an Education Office (Secretary to the Committee, Joseph Walkden) in Howard Chambers. The earliest documentation found is a number of advertisements from the Education Committee in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter in 1904. Joseph Walkden, and the office, are listed in Kelly's directories of 1908 and 1912, the office moving to the Town Hall after the first world war.

In July 1913, the building “now in the occupation of the Glossop Education Authority, The Glossop-Dale Savings Bank and Mr. J. K. Hollingbery as tenants thereof” was offered for sale. Unfortunately copies of the newspapers reporting the sale are not available.

The Sheffield Daily Telegraph of 4 June 1921 reported the formation of the company Glossop Printers Ltd which amalgamated several firms:
Glossop Printers Ltd, Private company Registered 31 May 1921. Capital £20,000 in £1 shares.
To take over the business of printers, stationers and booksellers carried on
(1) by T. Grant at Market Street, Glossop as "Schofield and Grant";
(2) by J. T. Witham at High Street West, Glossop;
(3) by J. W. Fernaly at Station Road, Hadfield and
(4) by W. H. Irlam and Co. Ltd. at Surrey Street, Glossop;
(5) the business of printers, newspaper publishers, stationers and bookbinders carried on by the "Glossop Dale Chronicle" Printing and Publishing Co., Ltd at Norfolk Street, Glossop and
(6) the business of a printer, newspaper, publisher, stationer and bookbinder carried on by S. T. Ashton at Howard Street, Glossop, the "Glossop Advertiser" Printing and Publishing
Registered Office: 6 Howard Street, Glossop

Samuel Thomas Ashton is recorded in the 1911 census as Newspaper Editor, living in Sunlaws Street. In the 1939 register he is a journalist living in Manor Park Road.

Glossop Printers advert, Mount Pleasant Bazaar 1926
Glossop Printers advert, Mount Pleasant Bazaar 1926.


The next available directory is Kelly's 1925. In the meantime John Hollingbery had gone into business with Frederick Denby Ashton, chartered accountant, as Hollingbery & Ashton but had died in 1922. the company is listed at Howard chambers, Howard Street.
The directory also lists Glossop Printers Limited (J. W. I. Worthington, secretary) as printers at 6 Howard Street, telephone number 67. Glossop Printers Ltd. were proprietors & publishers of Glossop Advertiser; Glossop Dale Chronicle; High Peak Advertiser and High Peak Chronicle, all published on Fridays from 6 Howard Street.

Kelly's directory of 1928 carried similar listings, with the addition of Hollingbery & Ashton having a telephone (number given as 167).

In the 1932 and 1936 Kelly directories, Frederick Ashton was in partnership with Stanley Roberts as Ashton & Roberts. Stanley Roberts was also secretary of Keg Estates Ltd., 6 Howard Street. The two business, along with Glossop Printers, were listed as having telephone number 67.
In Kelly 1941 directory the only change was that Ashton & Roberts had a telephone number of 380.

Steam Printing Offices

Something of a mystery is the location of the Steam Printing Offices in Howard Street where the Glossop Advertiser and related titles were produced.
Thomas Pettit had first published the Glossop Advertiser in 1871 from 4 Market Street, which is listed in the 1871 census as Printing Office Lock Up (Pettit is listed with his family at 18 High Street East).
Kelly's directory of 1876 lists North Derbyshire & North Cheshire Advertiser (Thomas Allard Pettit, proprietor), High street west.
The Glossop Chronicle & Advertiser of 9 July 1937, in an article about the merger of the two previous papers, said that Thomas Pettit “built his works in Howard Street and the original building which saw the birth of the “Advertiser” was part of the works of Glossop Printers Ltd.”

The move to Howard Street had occurred by 1878 as Morris & Co's Commercial Directory & Gazetteer of Ashton-Under-Lyne & District of that year lists Thomas Allard Pettit as a machine printer, proprietor and publisher of the North Derbyshire and North Cheshire Advertiser in Howard Street, with offices in Howard Street, Glossop, and Station Road, Hadfield

Pettit advert 1878 directory
Pettit advert 1878 directory.


The census of 1881 lists Thomas A Pettit as a printer & newspaper proprietor in Howard Street, but with no number. The entry comes after number 4 and before number 32 (now number 20).
Kelly's directory of 1881 lists Thomas as publisher & proprietor of the “North Derbyshire & North Cheshire Advertiser,” Howard Street and as an insurance agent for the Hand-in-Hand and London & Staffordshire Fire companies.
The masthead of the Derbyshire & North Cheshire Advertiser and Glossop and High Peak Herald for Friday January 13 1882 says it is “Printed by Thomas Allard Pettit at his Steam Printing Offices, Howard Street and published by him at 27 High Street West”. In the 1881 census the family of Thomas's brother, Edwin, was listed at 27 High Street West where Edwin was a printer & stationer.
Thomas subsequently emigrated to Australia and Edwin took the business over. The masthead of the North Derbyshire & North Cheshire Advertiser and Glossop and High Peak Herald for Friday March 20 1885 says it is “Printed by Edwin Walter Pettit of High Street West and published by him at his Steam Printing Offices, Howard Street”.
All this, of course, took place before 1883, which is the date on Howard Chambers at number 6. That indicates that the Steam Printing Offices could have been where Hayloft is currently, at number 8. However, as we see below, number 12 was the residence of newspaper employees later on.

Kelly's directories of 1888 lists the North Derbyshire & North Cheshire Advertiser (Edwin Walter Pettit, publisher & proprietor; published Saturday), Howard Street, whilst that of 1891 lists the North Derbyshire & North Cheshire Advertiser (Advertiser Printing & Publishing Co. Limited, publishers & proprietors ; pub. sat.), Howard Street.
As noted above, Edwin Pettit was the younger brother of Thomas and had taken over the newspaper business when Thomas emigrated to Australia. Edwin's wife, Mary Alice Fothergill, was a granddaughter of George Robinson (b. 1820) (see The Robinsons of Gnat Hole).

The similar entry in the Post Office Directory of 1895 lists William Widdup, as manager and A. Thorniley as secretary of the company, whilst Kelly's directories of 1899, 1900, 1908 and 1912 simply list North Derbyshire & North Cheshire Advertiser (Advertiser Printing & Publishing Co. Lim. publishers & proprietors ; pub. friday), with no individual names. That seems to have coincided with the acquisition of an interest in the Advertiser by Edward Partington. However, Edwin must have retained an interest as the Derby & District Trades directory of 1903 lists “North Cheshire and North Derbyshire Advertiser,” Glossop Advertiser Printing and Publishing Co., Ltd., Howard Street. E. W. Pettit, manager and Edwin described himself as a newspaper manager in the 1911 census, when he was living in Devonshire House, Surrey Street with his son and two of his daughters.

12 Howard Street

The first mention found of number 12 is in Kelly's directory of 1888, which lists William Griffiths William, newspaper reporter, as the occupant.
By the time of the 1891 census, Edwin Pettit had moved into No 12 and was also listed there in Kelly's directory of 1891 and the Post Office directory of 1895.

An advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 16 August 1895 said that A & J Phillips offered removal of furniture with the address of 12 Howard Street. Perhaps Edwin Pettit had moved to Hollingworth by then.

By the time of the 1901 census, John Thomas Goddard, auctioneer & valuer, had moved in. He was also a Certified Bailiff under the “Law of Distress Amendment Act”. He was listed as still there in the 1911 census and in all the Kelly directories up to 1928.

Kelly's directories of 1932, 1936 and 1941 list Ralph Sam, outfitter, at 12 Howard Street. In the 1939 Register he described himself as a draper. He died in 1950, being survived by his wife, Lily. In the 1936 directory, their son Gordon, a taxi-cab proprietor (telephone number 129) was also listed.

14 Howard Street

It appears that the buildings at this address were initially working premises, with the dwelling being built later, as John Hall is listed in the various available directories from 1876 to 1903 as a blacksmith. The only time he appears, with his family, as a resident of number 14 is in the census of 1901. In earlier years they had been living in Charles Street and in 1911 in High Street West. The smithy was marked on the 1897 OS map.
The first time number 14 appeared in the census was in 1891 when James Henry Newton and his family were living there. They had been there a few years as the death of their daughter, Eliza, was announced in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 8 September 1888.
The 1911 census lists two households, those of Henrietta Kilfoyle and Hugh Traynor.
The 1939 register lists the family of Thomas Gorman, a PSV motor driver.

Smithy marked on 1897 map
Smithy marked on 1897 map


16 Howard Street

Number 16 comprises not only a dwelling house but also the adjacent premises of the Glossop Carriage Company, one of the longest established businesses in Glossop.
The first mention found is in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 29 May 1880 which carried the first of a number of advertisements for James Wood, Hearse, Coach and Cab Proprietor
In Kelly's directory the following year, the firm was referred to as George Wood & Brothers, undertakers & coach proprietors (formerly James Wood), Howard Street.
The name of the business changed again by 24 October 1885 when an advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter, referred to Samuel & James, late George Wood & Bros, the business to be carried on by them as S & J Wood.
In 1888, Kelly's directory listed Samuel & James Wood, undertakers & coach proprietors (formerly James Wood), Howard Street. It appears that James left the firm that year as the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 22 September 1888 carried an advertisement, stating that all debts owing to the company must be paid to and all claims to be paid by S. Wood.
The company name changed to Glossop Carriage Co. Limited shortly afterwards as a report of a funeral in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 23 March 1889 gave that name. Advertisements from 1890 named S. Wood as manager and Richd. Swann as deputy manager.
Richard Swann, cab driver, was recorded at number 16 in the 1891 census and by December 1894 he had become manager.
Sadly, he lasted less than five years in that post as the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 13 October 1899 carried a report of the inquest into his death. The verdict was suicide whilst in a state of temporary insanity.

Glossop Carriage Co advert, Whitfield bazaar 1901
Glossop Carriage Co advert, Whitfield bazaar 1901.


The first advertisement found naming Richard Swann's replacement as manager, William Townend, was in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 8 February 1901. The occupant of number 16 in that year's census (and that of 1911) was William Townend, Manager of cab yard, with his family.
William's son, Walter, was appointed acting secretary for the Broadbottom Gas Company Ltd. in October 1905. Two years earlier, the Derby & District Trades Directory listing of Glossop Carriage Co., Ltd. gave a telephone number 24.
It was announced in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 12 February 1909 that the Carriage Company had taken over the business of Bagshaw & Fielding. Mr J. H. Fielding was appointed Managing Funeral Director. The notice was signed by W. Townend, General Manager and Joe R. Nield, Secretary.
The Carriage Company is, unsurprisingly, listed at the same address in each of the available Kelly's directories between 1912 and 1941, the only change being the telephone number becoming 59.

Glossop Carriage Co advert, Whitfield bazaar 1928
Glossop Carriage Co advert, Whitfield bazaar 1928.


Numbers 20 to 26 Howard Street appear to have always been private dwellings but there are some mentions in trade directories. In the 1871 and 1881 censuses they were numbered 32 to 38 but had been renumbered by the time of the 1891 census.

20 (32) Howard Street

Recorded in the census of 1871 was the family of Joseph Downs, a cotton yarn dresser. He was a prize winning bantam breeder according to an article in Soulby's Ulverston Advertiser and General Intelligencer of 2 January 1868 about the Ulverston Poultry & Canary Show.
In the 1881 census the occupants were the family of Mary Lomas, a widow. She was also listed in Kelly's directory of 1888. Mary's husband, Robert, was listed in Morris's Directory of 1878 as a lime and stone merchant in Howard Street
The 1891 census records Grace Lomas and her brother Robert, children of Mary. Mary and the rest of the family had moved to live at 142 High Street West with daughter Olive, her husband George Dewsnap and family. Mary died in 1892.
Grace Lomas was still living in the house as late as the 1901 census and when the house was sold in 1902.
At the time of the 1911 census the house was occupied by Joseph Braddock, a finisher at the printworks, and his family.
In the 1939 register, the occupants were John Russell, labourer, and his family.

22 (34) Howard Street

Occupied at the time of the 1871 census by the family of William Howarth, a cotton warp sizer.
The family of Joseph Wagstaffe, painter & grainer, occupied the house at the time of the 1881 census. They were still recorded there in Kelly's directory of 1888 and the 1891 census. Joseph had died by the time of the 1901 census but the house was still occupied by his widow, Mary, and three of their children.
The tenancy changed in late 1902 or early 1903 as the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 12 June 1903 carried a report of the appointment as School Attendance Officer of Herbert Harrison, 22 Howard Street. He was recorded there, with his family, in the census of 1911.
In the 1939 register, the occupants were John McGowan, labourer, and his family. They suffered a tragedy the following year when their son, Signalman Ernest McGowan, was killed in action when the Lancastria was sunk. The Manchester Evening News of 22 January 1944 reported that Hugh Molson, M.P. was to ask a question in the House of Commons as to why his mother Mrs Catherine McGowan had still not received the pension due as a result of Ernest's death.

24 (36) Howard Street

In 1871 the occupants were the family of John Lewis, auctioneer. They had been there from at least 1867 as John advertised in the Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser of 7 September that year.
At the time of the 1881 census the house was the home of Alice Warhurst, a widowed dressmaker, and her family. They were also still recorded there in Kelly's directory of 1888 and the 1891 census. Alice, by then a retired dressmaker, was still living in the house, with her daughter Mary and her family, at the time of the 1901 census. The head of the household was Mary's husband, Arthur Warner, a commercial traveller.
At the time of the 1911 census the occupants were George Dewsnap and his family. George's wife was Mary, née Lomas, who had lived at number 20 as detailed above.
At the time the 1939 Register was taken the house was occupied by Ada Hadfield, a retired school teacher whose father, James Hadfield, was once licensee of the Arundel Arms. Ada died on 16 August 1947, still resident of 24 Howard Street.

26 (38) Howard Street

This is the only one of these properties for which it has been possible to work out (by reference to later records) the occupants at the time of the 1861 census, the family of Charles Lewis, a slater & plasterer, also mentioned in White's directory of 1862. He died on 21 December 1866, aged 49, leaving a will to be executed by a John Clegg & a John Addison. The Glossop Record of 12 January 1867 carried an advertisement for them, describing them as slaters, plasterers &c, successors to the late Charles Lewis. Unfortunately the estate was unable to pay the mortgage owing on the property, as the following article from the Hyde & Glossop Weekly News, and North Cheshire Herald of 22 June 1867 shows.

Hyde & Glossop Weekly News, and North Cheshire Herald 22 June 1867


It appears that the equity case was settled amicably as there were two households recorded there in the 1871 census. The first was the family of John Addison, painter, and, the second was Sarah, Jane and Annie Lewis (daughters of Charles Lewis) plus a mother and son boarding with them.
In the census of 1881 the occupants are recorded as the family of William Hyde, a cotton loom overlooker.
In Kelly's directory of 1888 the occupant was John Ludlam, Glossop station master, the first of several railway employees occupying the house.
By the time of the 1891 census, Alfred Charlesworth, railway clerk, had moved in. He was still the tenant in the Post Office and Bulmer's directories of 1895 but by 1899 (Kelly's directory) the new station master, John Henry Schofield, had moved in with his family.
John Schofield bought the four houses, numbers 20 to 26, in November 1902 when they were sold pursuant to the closure of a trust following the death of Hannah Lawton of Rose Cottage, Simmondley Lane on 1 May 1902. Her husband William, a retired grocer, had died on 19 May 1862. A report of the auction in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 7 November 1902 noted that the properties (tenanted at the time by Miss Lomas, Mrs Wagstaffe, Mrs Warhurst and Mr J. H. Schofield) were sold to John Schofield for £800.
John Schofield was listed as still there in Kelly's of 1912 but had moved to Spire Hollin by the time the 1925 directory was published. Number 26 was not mentioned in that directory but the one published in 1928 listed Mrs Winifred Shaw, ladies' hairdresser, as occupant.
The occupants at the time the 1939 register was taken were Walter Bowler, a Foreman Waste & Paper Stock Merchant, and his family.

Corner of Howard Street and Talbot Street

In 1854 the Wesleyan Reformers built a chapel on the corner of Talbot Street with Howard Street. Articles about anniversaries in the Glossop Record indicate that a Sunday School actually started in 1852. They added a school between the chapel and number 26 in 1893. The chapel was replaced in 1897 but demolished some years after it closed in 1965. The school building still stands and is occupied by Howard Street Group Medical Practice.

28 Howard Street (The Hollies)

The first census mention is in 1891 when the occupant is recorded as William Henry Bowden, timber merchant. He was listed there three years earlier, in Kelly's directory of 1888. Between then and Kelly's directory of 1912 William (who also became a councillor and a magistrate) was variously described as a builder, timber merchant, and saw, planing, and moulding mills proprietor. He died on 4 October 1926, by which time the family home was 9 Fauvel Road.

When I first published this article I was mystified by the fact that there were no entries for number 28 in any census records. The fact that the census entries for William Henry Bowden in 1891 and 1901 carried no house number fooled me into thinking his home and builders merchant business was in a separate properly from number 28 (which I guessed, wrongly, had to be number 36). I have now been contacted by a reader of the article and told that it is number 28 which used to be called The Hollies (the name William Bowden used, rather than a number, in his 1911 census entry).

Employment Exchange Glossop Jobcentre Plus now stands in the gap between 28 and 38. The current building was erected in the late 1930s (date stone 1937 above the door), Kelly's directory of 1941 being the first to refer to it - Ministry of Labour Employment Exchange (Egerton Doodson, manager), Howard Street, T N 83

38 Howard Street, Fern House (date stone 1889).

The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 2 March 1878 carried an advertisement under the heading 38 Howard Street, Glossop from John Ford, auctioneer, for the sale by auction, at number 38, of all the Household Furniture and other effects of John Hobson, late of the Star Inn, under instruction of his widow. It is not clear from the wording whether the furniture in question was from number 38 or the Star.
The occupants at the time of the 1891 census were Henry Jefferson, spring mattress manufacturer, and his family. Henry Jefferson was listed in the Post Office and Bulmer's directories of 1895 but the family appears to have moved that year as advertisements in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter in September 1895 offered the house and the two storey workshop at the back for sale by auction. It can't have sold at the auction as it was subsequently advertised for sale by private treaty.

Fern House, Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter 13 September 1895
Fern House, Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter 13 September 1895.


Kelly's directories of 1899 and 1900 list both John Wood Bowden, Relieving & Vaccination Officer, and John Garside, mineral water manufacturer, at Fern House.
The census of 1901 records that John Bowden was a widower and that John Garside was his son in law, married to Elizabeth, living in the same house with his family.
In 1904 John Garside applied for a beer licence but dropped the application in the face of opposition as the notice from 19 February and report from 4 March, below, show.

Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter 19 February 1904
          
Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter 4 March 1904


John Wood Bowden, still of the same address, died on 5 June 1913. The Garside mineral water business was voluntarily wound up on 27 September 1913. The Garsides moved to Southport where Elizabeth died 11 February 1951 and John died on 4 June 1953.
The firm was bought by Wilson & Bates, recorded as aerated water manufacturers, telephone number 88 in the available Kelly directories from 1925 & 1928 and as aerated water manufacturers and wine & spirit merchants in those of 1932 to 1941 (they had obviously overcome the objections to alcohol). The entry in the 1939 register records the occupants as Samuel Platt, Master Of Mineral Water Works, Ale & Stout Bottler, Wines & Spirits, together with his family.

There is no property numbered 40 or 42 but numbers 44 to 48 Howard Street appear to have always been private dwellings. The first census in which they are mentioned in 1901.

44 Howard Street

Occupied at the time of the 1901 census by Micah Whitehead, church caretaker, and his family, at the time of the 1911 census by Charles Newton, labourer, and his wife and when the 1939 register was taken by Robert Boak, railway locomotive fireman, and his family.

46 Howard Street

In the 1901 census the occupants were Margaret Hill, a widow, and her family. Kelly's directories of 1899 and 1900 list Samuel Hill, painter, there.
In 1911 the occupants were James Bowden, unemployed, and his family.
The 1939 register records Fred Gregory Bradley, stone mason, and his family.

48 Howard Street

The occupants at the time of the 1901 census were George and Olive Dewsnap and their family, who later moved to number 24.
The 1911 census records the family of Denis Casey, a striper and grinder in a cotton mill.
Recorded in the 1939 register are the widowed Margaret Hallsworth with her daughter and son in law, Hilda and Thomas Lynch.

Unresolved references.

The following heads of households were recorded in the 1861 census but it hasn't been possible to identify which properties they occupied: James Hallsworth, mechanic; Ann Robinson, school mistress; John Collier, bookkeeper; Susannah Harrop; Hannah Handford; Francis Whittingham; James Hollowood; John Oldham; Thomas Cooper (the Glossop Record of 2 July 1859 carried an advertisement for Thomas Cooper, accountant &c, Howard Street; register office); Henry Winrow; Joseph Robinson; John Howard; Thomas Sorton; Levi Taylor; George Runcorn; James Moorhouse.

Kelly's directory of 1888 lists Buxton Lime Co. (Mrs. S. Waterhouse, agent), lime merchants, Howard Street.

An advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 21 June 1895 offered typewriting lessons at the Howard Street Typewriting Offices.

The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 20 February 1903 carried an advertisement for the Derbyshire Wire Mattress Co, Howard Street.

Kelly's directories of 1899, 1900, 1908 and 1912 listed William H. Sheppard who, as well as being a farmer at Ashes, was a furniture remover at Howard Street.

Kelly's directories of 1925, 1928 and 1932 listed John Greenwood, the quarry owner, as a stone merchant in Howard Street.

Kelly's directory of 1928 listed Harris & Taylor, ironfounders, Howard Street.

Harry Hadwin was listed in Kelly's directories of 1925 and 1928 as a bleachers’ engineer, Howard Street, and in those of 1932, 1936 and 1941 (the latter as a limited company) as “patent scrimp rails”, Howard Street, telephone number 122.



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Last updated: 23 January 2022