The Early Development of Shops and Businesses of Norfolk Square and Henry Street, Glossop.

This article is an attempt to document the early occupants of Norfolk Square and Henry Street, from about 1850 to 1925 or so, using available records in censuses, directories and newspapers. Any additional information will be gratefully received.
I must also acknowledge the help of Mike Brown for allowing me to use photos which he has in his collection and providing information about his family's links to Henry Street.

Researching the history of business in Norfolk Square and Henry Street is hindered by changing in numbering, meaning some apparent house numbers in census listings are misleading, and redevelopment of some buildings. It is clear that the numbering of the properties between number 8 and Bank House in Henry Street (current numbers 20 to 22) has been revised at least once. In addition, Henry Street addresses were sometimes listed as Norfolk Square (and vice versa). Some directory publishers also seem to have continued to use building numbers from previous directories even though a revision had taken place.

1857 map

The 1857 Poor Law Map appears to show that the whole of the western side of Norfolk Square (1 to 7) had been built on. On the northern side of Henry street we can see what are now numbers 8, 10, 12, 14, 16 and 18 plus the western end of Bank House and an indication that the eastern end was under construction. There are also some further buildings (not the same as number 24 of today) at the eastern end. On the south side of Henry Street are the Norfolk Chambers buildings, to the north of the Norfolk Arms, with what looks like a separate, adjoined, building at the eastern side of Norfolk Square (though the southern part seems to be under construction).

1880 map

By the time of the town plan of 1880, the layout is more like that of today, the construction on the eastern side of Norfolk Square and at the western end of Henry Street having been completed.

1897 map

The 1897 map shows a gap where the Nat West Bank now stands, the original buildings having been demolished to make way for their replacement. RBS records tell us that the purpose built Manchester & County Bank building was constructed for the branch opening in 1890 but directories of 1891 and 1895 list it as being in High Street West, 1899 being the first listing of the bank in Norfolk Square.

1919 map

The 1919 map shows the buildings we are familiar with today. The Liberal Club and the extension to the Manchester & County Bank have replaced the earlier construction.

This article takes a virtual walk along the western side of Norfolk Square, the northern side of Henry Street and then back along the southern side and down the eastern side of Norfolk Square. In Norfolk Square the numbers ran consecutively, rather than the odds one side and evens the other as is usual.

1 Norfolk Square

The first occupant we can be certain of is Thomas Handford with his grocery business. The earliest advertisement available is in the Glossop Record of 24 November 1860 but it appears that the Handfords had been there for some time as Mrs Handford had been advertising that Grove Mills, Hayfield, were for sale since the preceding August.
The shop, together with numbers 2 and 3, was advertised for sale by auction in then Glossop Record of 21 July 1866. Two months later (Glossop Record 22 September 1866) Thomas Handford advertised that he was removing from 1 Norfolk Square to the shop on the corner of High Street West and Market Street lately occupied by Edward Sykes (see Town Hall Shops, 5 to 23 High Street West).

Handford was replaced by William Ingerson's drapery, bonnet and millinery establishment, which was advertised as moving from Norfolk Street in the Glossop Record of 17 November 1866. Ingerson stayed there more than 20 years. The census of 1871 and Kelly's directory of 1881 indicate he may also have occupied numbers 2 and 4 Norfolk Square for a time though. In the census of 1881, he and the family were living at 2-4 High Street West where they had another shop, the Norfolk Square shop being a lock up. The end of Ingerson's stay in Norfolk Square seems to have come in February 1889 when R. W. Sykes advertised that he was selling the household furniture and other effects at 1 Norfolk Square. It appears that it was then that the Co-op took over the building.

2 Norfolk Square

The Glossop Record of 28 October 1865 carried an advertisement for Mason's Pianoforte & Harmonium Repository, which Joseph Mason had moved from his Norfolk Street home. Like Thomas Handford, he was also mentioned as tenant in the auction advertisement of 21 July 1866. In the following November he moved his business back to Norfolk Street. The 1881 census shows the property as a lock up shop.

3 Norfolk Square

No occupier was listed for the shop at the time of the 1866 advert and there has been no information found about its occupation immediately following the sale but it looks like this was where John Hardman moved the Post Office to when decided that his business at The Corner (see Number 1 High Street West, Glossop's Noted Corner Shop) was not suitable. The Ashton Weekly Reporter, and Stalybridge and Dukinfield Chronicle of 14 March 1868 reported “During the week the post-office has been removed to more commodious and central premises in Norfolk Square”. An advertisement in the Glossop Record of 23 January 1869 mentions that John Lewis had received instructions from William Middleton to auction all his household furniture &c at the shop next door to the Post Office, Norfolk Square “where the goods have been removed for convenience of sale”.

Hardman never included the number in the address any of his advertisements but there was no mention of the Post Office moving when he moved his dentistry business to his home in Norfolk Street and Betty Kaye Woodhead took over as Postmistress in June 1870. We know she lived at number 3 from the 1871 census, which lists Betty and her brother Daniel's family. The entry includes Daniel's daughter Sarah, who was working with Betty as a telegraphist.

Daniel Woodhead (publisher of the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter) gives his address as 5 Norfolk Square in the newspaper issue of 3 September 1870 but that was changed to 3 Norfolk Square in the issue of 5 November. The newspaper continued to be published from that address until the end of October 1873 when Ann Woodhead (Daniel's widow) moved it back to the family's original premises at 50 High Street West (which they had always kept running as a stationery shop).

The Post Office, with Betty and Sarah in charge, remained at 3 Norfolk Square until April 1875, when it moved to the newly built 4 Henry Street.

In the 1881 census number 3 was a lock up shop, part of the Co-op.

4 Norfolk Square

No clear information has been found about this shop. It could be the premises referred to in the auction advertisement of January 1869 but that is not certain. In 1881 it was a lock up shop.

5 Norfolk Square

About three years after the Glossop Dale New Industrial Co-operative Society was formed the need for larger premises was identified and the Society started to acquire property in Norfolk Square. The Ashton Weekly Reporter, and Stalybridge and Dukinfield Chronicle of 30 January 1869 reported “Last week the Glossop Industrial Co-operative Society purchased four of the large shops in Norfolk Square, to three of which they will shortly remove their extensive business. The remaining shop is held on a lease, else it is probable that one would be absorbed as well.” It is thought that the four shops were numbers 2 to 5, number 3 being the one with the lease, for the Post Office.

J. G. Harrod's directory of 1870 lists “Glossop Dale Industrial and Co-operative Society, Norfolk square - secretary, W. T. Nutter; manager, H. W. Lees” and an advertisement was published in the Glossop Record of 15 October 1870 “Shoemakers wanted, Apply Co-operative Shoe Store, Norfolk Square”. The 1871 census sheet has a note “Cooperative Stores” above the entry for number 6. The directors announced, in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 7 July 1883, that all tenders for erection of new buildings were to be submitted by 9 July.

Co-op building
The original Co-op buildings after the acquisition of 1869 and move of the Post Office.

In addition to the various departments, the building contained an extensive library. The earliest woodcut of the new buildings shows that they covered numbers 2 to 5, which fits with the fact that Ingerson's didn't leave number 1 until 1889, giving the Co-op the chance to extend the building. One strange thing is that the Co-op registered office was usually given as 2 Railway Street, that despite the fact that census records show the property occupied by others, most notably the grocery business run by William Eversden from mid-1869 until he died on 13 December 1906.

Co-op building
The Co-op buildings after Ingersons had moved in 1889.

The verandah around the building, similar to the one which had been erected around Jackson's Buildings on the corner of High Street East and Victoria Street, was put in place in 1907. A report in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 14 February 1908 stated that the new verandah round the Central Co-operative buildings was a splendid town improvement. The Glossop Whispers column in the issue of 27 March included the comments “That the Glossop Co-operators have made their Central premises look very pretty with the new verandah” and “That the Postal Authorities should also be asked to fix a verandah to the rest of the block”.

For more about “The Stores” see The Glossop Dale New Industrial Co-operative Society.

Co-op building
The Co-op buildings after the verandahs had been installed.


6 Norfolk Square

Number 6 is the easiest of all the properties to deal with as a result if the longevity of the businesses run by the Schofield family and the fact that many directory entries give the full address. Charles Schofield was listed as a bookseller, stationer, printer and bookbinder &c as early as Slater's directory of 1850. Charles Schofield died on 23 March 1886, having been joined in the business by his son, Alfred Ernest, some ten years or so earlier and the business having expanded to included the sale of toys and newspapers.
Following Charles's death, Alfred ran the printing side of the business from the rear of the premises in Railway Street (reputedly briefly publishing his own newspaper, the Glossop Express, for a short while) whilst his sisters Mary Ellen and Annie ran the shop. They expanded the sale of toys and fancy goods (the shop being described as Schofield's Bazaar in an advertisement in December 1892).
Ann Schofield died on 19 May 1898 but Mary carried on for around 18 months before selling up. The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 22 June 1900 advertised the sale of stock in trade, surplus furniture &c at 6 Norfolk Square for Miss Schofield. By that time, Alfred had moved to 36-38 Norfolk Street where he later went into partnership with Thomas Grant.
When Mary died in 1943 she was the oldest member of Littlemoor Independent Church. Her retirement probably allowed the GPO to purchase the building to extend the Post Office next door.

7 Norfolk Square

This plot is somewhat confusing as some of the earliest records seem to indicate that it was occupied by two families, those of John Bower Smith and William Sykes. Both are listed as being in Norfolk Street in the 1861 census.
The Glossop Record of 2 February 1861 carried an advertisement for the auction sale of a “plot of land adjoining Henry Street and Railway Street and fronting Norfolk Square..........together with the shop and dwelling-house occupied by Mr Smith, cabinet maker erected upon part of the land”. It went on to say that a considerable portion of the land was unbuilt upon so was a “very eligible situation for the erection of shops or public buildings”. No further information about the sale of the plot has been found but John Smith later moved to High Street West. He was described as “of High Street” in a report in the Glossop Record issue of 22 June 1867 about the furniture he had made for the town hall. When he left is unknown but the Glossop Record of 7 September 1867 carried an advertisement for the shop (situate in Norfolk Square and formerly in the occupation of Mr. J. B. Smith, cabinet maker) to be let, applications to be made to William Eversden, High Street. The advertisement ran for over a year (until the end of November 1868) but no details of any letting were published in the newspapers.

It would appear that the shop occupied by John Smith was on the corner of Henry Street and Railway Street as the Post Office Directory of 1855 listed him at Henry Street whilst William Sykes is listed as a grocer in Norfolk Square. The Glossop Record of 27 August 1859 reported that William Sykes had applied at the Brewster Sessions for a licence for premises at the corner of Norfolk Square, indicating that he occupied the original number 7. William Sykes and his family continued in business until 1882, though William had retired and handed over to son Samuel by the time of the 1881 census.
The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 4 March 1882 carried two advertisements. The first was from William Sykes in which he thanked all his customers for their business over 33 years and hoping that would continue for his successor. The second was from that successor, Joseph Garlick, who had moved from 40 High Street East to take over the business. Joseph Garlick remained until October 1891 when he moved to 16 Dinting Vale.

The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 25 October 1884 carried an advertisement for S. W. B. Sykes at 6a Norfolk Square, a Wholesale Paper dealer and General Commission Agent. Samuel William Bennett Sykes (son of William who had been running the grocery shop when it was sold) was also listed as a paper merchant at 6 Norfolk square in Kelly's directory of 1888. Presumably he was renting part of number 6 or number 7.

The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 29 January 1892 reported that Miss Sarah Elizabeth Woodhead, Postmistress, had secured the lease of the premises lately occupied by Mr J. Garlick in order to move the Post Office from 4 Henry Street, where it had been for just over 16 and a half years years. The new Post Office opened on 29 March 1892.
On 1 June 1892, Sarah Elizabeth Woodhead married William Rodley (a chief steward with Cunard) at St James's, Whitfield. Sadly, they were not destined to enjoy a long marriage. William died aged 36 and was buried on 23 June 1898. Sarah died aged 44 and was buried on 30 September 1901.
Kelly's directory of 1908 listed Joseph Shepherd as postmaster. By the time of the 1911 census, he had been succeeded by James A Waterston.
Kelly's directory of 1925 listed James Cockroft as postmaster at Norfolk square, despite the Post Office having moved to Victoria Street in 1923.

Norfolk Square about 1905
The corner of Norfolk Square and Henry Street.
The electricity cabinets at the bottom right indicate that it is after 1903 whilst the lack of paths on the square mean it is before September 1906.

Henry Street about 1905
Henry Street about the same time with the National Telephone Company at number 4, Fullers at number 8 and Staggs at number 12.


2 Henry Street.

The property seems to have been built about 1874/5 at the same time as numbers 4 and 6 Henry Street. The early occupiers of this property are difficult to identify as it was sometimes referred to as being in Railway Street and numbers there also appear to have been revised over time. In the 1881 census it appears to be the unoccupied building listed as 10 Henry Street (next to 4 Railway Street) even though the current 10 Henry Street is also listed under that number.

William Eversden's grocery business is variously listed as 2 and 4 Railway Street. He continued to used the address 2 Railway Street in newspaper advertisements at the same time as the Co-op was using it in their advertisements. It may well be that Eversden occupied what is now 2 Henry Street when it was first built. He was listed at 2 Railway Street (the entry after that for Sarah Woodhead at the Post Office) in the 1891 census. In the 1901 census he was also listed at Railway Street (no number), in the entry immediately after Margaret Kenny who was occupying what is now 4 Henry Street.

The next occupant appears to be the greengrocery business of George & Joseph Howard. They advertised their greengrocer and florist business at Henry Street in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter, the earliest found being 20 March 1908 (previous advertisements place them at Hall Street). They are listed at 2 Railway Street in the 1911 census and Railway Street (no number) in Kelly's directory of 1912.

The confusion over numbering continued as late as 1941 when Kelly's directory listed Holliday & Pickup as insurance brokers at 4 Railway Street.
The company (still there of course) had moved from Barclays Bank buildings on Norfolk Street, where the company is listed in Kelly's directory of 1936, a couple of years earlier.
In those early days, Holliday and Pickup undertook other business as well as insurance. An advertisement in the Manchester Evening News of 26 January 1940 shows that the company was the sole distributor for Cheshire & Derbyshire of the Hartley Multi-louvre Headlamp Device, which enabled drivers to use their headlamps during the blackout.

4 Henry Street.

We know, from photographic evidence, that the property listed as number 12 in some directories and the 1911 census is what is now number 4.

We know that this property was built in 1874/5 as a notice in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 3 April 1875 stated “The post office is now removed to the new buildings adjoining Mr Eversden's shop.”. Whether that referred to Eversden's shop in Railway Street is not clear.
The Post & Money Order & Telegraph Office, Savings Bank & Government Insurance & Annuity Office, Norfolk square, is listed in the various directories until, as we have seen, it moved to 7 Norfolk Square in 1892.
An advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 26 February 1892 stated “To let, the excellently situated and commodious premises currently occupied as the Post Office, Glossop, apply Miss Woodhead, Post Office”.

It would appear that the shop was then occupied by Henry Edward Evason as a draper and milliner. An advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 4 January 1895 stated “To let, the house and shop now occupied by Mr H E Evason as a Millinery and Dressmaking Establishment, Henry Street (opposite the Post Office), Norfolk Square, may be entered on March 25th 1895, apply Wm. Eversden, Railway Street”.
In the Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser of 12 May 1893, “E” of 12 Henry Street, Norfolk Square had advertised for an experienced dressmaking first hand. Bulmer's directory of 1895 listed Evason as a draper & milliner at Norfolk Square. The Post Office directory of the same year listed him at 12 Henry Street but as cashier at Lord Howard's estate office, implying that he had closed the drapery business.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 20 March 1896, a Miss Band advertised that she had opened Commercial Dining & Refreshment Rooms at 12 Henry Street (opposite the Post Office), Norfolk Square. The business did not last because the 4 December issue of the newspaper carries an advertisement “To let at once, a good business commercial dining and refreshment rooms. Good reason for leaving.”.

No further mention has been found of the property until 1899 when Mrs Margaret Kenny announced, in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 14 April that she had removed her old established confectionery business, which she had run for 19 years, from 6 High Street East to 12 Henry Street, Norfolk Square, where she would carry on business as usual. A notice in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 4 August 1899 stated that Margaret Kenny had applied for a licence to sell sweets at 12 Henry Street, which she rented from the owner, William Eversden of 2 Railway Street, greengrocer, as a dwelling and shop. Margaret Kenny died on 19 July 1904 and the business was carried on by her younger daughter, Mary Margaret Kenny, who is recorded as a shopkeeper dealer in the 1911 census. She was listed as a confectioner in Kelly's directory of 1912.

Margaret's elder daughter, Maria, is listed in Bulmer's directory of 1895 as an operator at the National Telephone Company's call office at 6 High Street East. She was recorded at the Norfolk Square premises in the 1901 census, as a dressmaker and telephone operator, but it wasn't until the 1908 issue that Kelly's directories listed the National Telephone Company Limited (Miss Maria Johannah Kenny operator) at Norfolk Square. Maria was recorded as a telephone clerk in charge at (what was then) number 12 in the 1911 census. The National Telephone Company Limited was taken over by the Post Office on the expiry of its licence on 31 December 1911. Kelly's directory of 1912 lists the Post Office Telephone Public Call Office, Norfolk Square, Miss M. J. Kenny, operator.
When the new telephone exchange was opened in 1960, it was said that the first telephone exchange in Glossop was opened in 1895 at 22 (sic) Henry Street. When she died, in 1939, it was noted that Miss Maria Kenny (who retired in 1926 from the telephone service), her mother and sister, were in charge of the telephone office for a total of 37 years.

6 Henry Street.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 3 April 1875, William Eversden advertised a newly built house and shop, with a large brick oven attached, suitable for a baker, next to the new post office. No further mention has been found of the property so it may have been that it was used in conjunction with number 4 (the 1875 notice of the Post Office moving mentions “new buildings”). Having said that, William Eversden is listed as a grocer of Norfolk Square in the Post Office directory of 1876.

The plaques on the wall beside the door in the ca 1905 photo may indicate occupation by a lawyer or other professional.

8 Henry Street.

The 1871 census listed a builder named Peter Ingham as the occupant of 8 Henry Street. Mrs Ingham, 8 Norfolk Square, advertised for an apprentice in dress and mantle making in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 27 May 1871. The issue of the newspaper of 26 July 1873 carried an advertisement for a good house and shop at 8 Norfolk Square to be let with immediate possession.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 5 August 1876, David Percival gave notice that he intended applying at the annual licensing meeting on 28 August for his off licence for 4 Market Street to be transferred to 8 Norfolk Square. He had been advertising that his business had moved to 8 Norfolk Square since 24 June 1876. The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 2 September 1876 reported that the licence had been renewed without dispute.
David Percival was listed in Morris's directory of 1878 as a wine, spirit, ale and porter merchant at 8 Norfolk Square. The 1881 census recorded him at 8 Henry Street, with his mother Eliza and a servant. Eliza died there on 21 September 1881.

A report of the Glossop Agricultural Show in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 19 September 1885 mentions an exhibition of harness,saddlery, horse clothing &c by Mawson Brothers of Norfolk Square. The occupancy by Mawsons is confirmed by an advertisement for “T Mawson, saddler, 8 Norfolk Square, 2 doors from Post Office” in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 31 March 1888.
Kelly's directory of 1888 listed both David Percival and Thomas Mawson at number 8 but the 1885 report indicates that Percival had moved to the property which is now number 12 by then.
Thomas Mawson continued to be listed in directories and census records until Kelly's directory of 1900. He is recorded in the 1901 census a saddler & harness maker in Hyde.

There is no entry for the property in the census of 1901 but the Trades directory of 1903 lists E. Fuller as a saddler at 8 Norfolk Square. Edward Fuller is recorded as a saddler & harness maker at 64 Victoria Street in the 1901 census. The final listing for Edward was in Kelly's directory of 1928.

10 Henry Street.

Entries in the 1881 census and Kelly's directory of the same year indicate that Mathias Butler, medical practitioner/surgeon was the occupant.

An advertisement for shares in the Hollingworth Gas Company in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 21 January 1882 was placed by J. W. Tweedale, Solicitor, Norfolk Square. The entry in the Trades directory of 1903 gives an address for his successor of 10 Norfolk Square and listings in later directories for the practice simply say Norfolk Square so it is likely that it was 10 Henry Street.
Kelly's directory of 1899 listed John William Tweedale as Superintendent Registrar as well as a solicitor, his deputy being Joseph Marsden in the firm of Tweedale & Marsden.

J. W. Tweedale died on 24 March 1900 and Marsden toook it over. In Kelly's directory of 1908 Joseph Marsden was listed as clerk to the Hollingworth Urban District Council & to the Glossop Burial Board, Norfolk square. The 1912 edition listed Joseph Marsden as clerk to the Hollingworth Urban District Council but the position of Clerk to the Burial Board had been taken by his partner George Henry Wilson. Marsden died on 31 January 1913 and Wilson took over the practice.

Kelly's directory of 1925 listed George Henry Wilson as solicitor & commissioner for oaths, clerk to Hollingworth Urban District Council, clerk to the Glossop & Charlesworth Joint Burial Board & deputy coroner for the High Peak Hundred division of the county. In the 1932 edition he was no longer clerk to the Burial Board. By the time of the 1936 directory, and Hollingworth UDC had been replaced by Longdendale Urban District Council.

Norfolk Square and Henry Street about 1910
This view of Norfolk Square and Henry Street is probably around 1910, the Co-op verandah being in place.


Masonic Buildings 12-18 Henry Street.

An advertisement regarding the liquidation of the Glossop Brewery Company Ltd in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 19 August 1882 named Thomas Swindells Bowden of 10 Norfolk Square, accountant, as liquidator. This would probably be an office within the Masonic Buildings as the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 21 November 1890 contained an advertisement for Thomas S. Bowden & Co, Auctioneers & Valuers, Masonic Buildings, Norfolk Square. Kelly's directory of 1891 listed him as Assistant Borough Treasurer at Norfolk Square.

The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 21 February 1896 advertised that the office above the archway at the Masonic Buildings and the large warehouse behind were to let. Application was to be made to William H Irlam, Printer & stationer. Presumably this was the archway between the current numbers 18 (Equity House) and 20 (Bank House). Photographic evidence shows that in the early years of the 20th century, Irvine Dearnaley had a business accessed that through the archway so he could well have been the one to answer Irlam's advertisement.

Henry Street 1930s
This view of 12 to 18 Henry Street is probably from the 1930s.
The prominent Stagg sign appears to have been removed from number 12 and the Refuge Assurance Co. is occupying number 18.


12 Henry Street.

As noted above, it appears that David Percival moved his business to this building between 1881 and 1885. When he died, aged only 39, on 15 September 1888 his address was listed as 10 Henry Street, Norfolk Square. In the immediate aftermath, the business was carried on by his sister & Mr Percival Millar before it was sold to William T. Stagg of Hyde. The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 20 December 1889 carried a report of the license transfer and the first advertisement for Stagg & Sons, successors of the late Mr David Percival. Census and directory entries variously gave the address as 10 or 8.

The Sheffield Independent of 20 September 1898 reported that the off licence recently held by Mr Pownall Stagg had been transferred to James Riley and just over a year later (Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter 17 November 1899) Frederick Lewis Stockton applied for, and was granted, a temporary off licence for 10 Henry Street (late tenant James Riley), though the business continued to trade under the name Stagg & Sons.
The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 20 April 1900 carried an advertisement offering for sale by private treaty the Wine, Spirit, Ale & Porter and Cigar Merchants at 10 Henry Street (old established wholesale and retail business carried on by Stagg & Son) including the shop & dwelling house fronting Norfolk Square, off licences for beer and spirits attached.

It was reported in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 1 June 1900 that Thomas Sheppard had applied for a copy of the off licence for 10 Henry Street, held by Frederick Stockton, which had been lost. Stockton had left and Sheppard wanted a temporary licence until 10 June (granted).
Two weeks later the newspaper reported that the off licence for 10 Henry Street had been transferred to Thomas Sheppard. He was recorded as a wine & spirit agent in the 1901 census.
At the time of the 1911 census (still referred to as number 10), Charles Beard was Manager of the wine & spirit stores. Kelly's directories of 1908 & 1912 listed Charles Beard as the Vaccination Officer at Norfolk Square.
The business continued to be listed as Stagg & Son in directories until Kelly's 1932 which first mentioned Wilson & Bates, aerated water manufacturers, Howard Street, and wine & spirit merchants, 10 Norfolk Square.

14 Henry Street.

The provision of a separate Masonic Lodge entrance enabling access to the Masonic Hall covering the upstairs rooms across the current numbers 12 to 18 appears to have been one reason for property renumbering in Henry Street.
The Sheffield Daily Telegraph of 3 May 1890 referred to the “new Masonic Hall, Norfolk Square” when reporting an installation ceremony for new members of the Lodge. It would seem, therefore, that the existing buildings were replaced or converted. Hamnett tells us that the Devonshire Lodge opened on the 11th January 1854 at the Globe Inn, moved to the Norfolk Arms Hotel in 1857, and remained there until the masons secured the premises in Norfolk Square.
Kelly's directory of 1891 and the Post Office Directory of 1895 both list George Brown, tyler, at the Freemasons’ Lodge (Devonshire). In Kelly's directories of 1899 and 1900, George Brown is listed as caretaker of the Masonic lodge, 12 Norfolk Square with his daughter, Miss Louise Brown, a dress maker at 12 Norfolk Square. The family lived in the cottage at the rear of 12 to 18.
George Brown was listed as caretaker again in Kelly's directory of 1908 but the position had been taken by 1908 Joseph Fielding by the time of the 1912 directory. No entry has been found for the Masonic Lodge in the 1911 census.
Listed as secretary in Kelly's directory of 1925 is J. E. Buckley; in the directories of 1928 and 1932, Percy E. Ireland; and in those of 1936 and 1941, George Henry Wilson

16 Henry Street.

The first mention found of this property (then number 10) is in Harrod's directory of 1870 when George Bowden was listed as a shopkeeper and sugar-boiler, Norfolk square. On 15 August 1874 the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter carried a notice that George Bowden was applying for an excise licence to retail sweets at 10 Norfolk Square, mentioning that he rented the property from the executors of one Thomas Naylor deceased. George Bowden was listed as a confectioner in the Post Office directory of 1876 and as a pork butcher and confectioner in Morris's directory of 1878.
No records have been found of later occupants.

18 Henry Street (Equity House).

In the Glossop Record of 25 April 1868, John Hampson, a corn dealer in High Street advertised the letting of “an excellent shop and house suitable for nearly any business next door to the District Bank, Norfolk Square”.
In the Derbyshire Times and Chesterfield Herald of 13 November 1869 there was an announcement that Higginbottom & Arden, auctioneers & valuers had taken an office adjoining the District Bank, Norfolk Square. The partnership was dissolved on 9 August 1870, with Charles Higginbottom carrying on alone at Norfolk Square.
In the early years of the 20th century (and maybe earlier), the Co-op occupied the shop as its Tailoring Department.
Kelly's directories of 1925 to 1941 list the Refuge Assurance Co. Limited in Norfolk Square, some entries giving the number 12. Photographic evidence shows that the property was the one now numbered 18.

18-22 Henry Street about 1905
This view of 18 to 22 Henry Street is probably from around 1905 as the diagonal paths have not been laid out.


20-22 Henry Street (Bank House).

It has not been possible to find out when Bank House was built but, as noted above, the 1857 Poor Law Map shows its western end (marked 97) and an indication that the eastern end was under construction. The first directory to mention that the Manchester and Liverpool District Banking Company traded from Norfolk Square was Harrod's of 1870. The premises continued to be used by the bank until the merger with the Manchester & County Bank meant that the business of both was combined at the latter's premises in the 1930s (see The First Hundred Years of Banking in Glossop).

The 1939 Register shows that Arthur Sherlock, the bank manager, continued to live at Bank House with his wife and a servant. Directories record that, for around ten years either side of the turn of the 20th century, managers of the bank also took on the roles of Borough Treasurer and Treasurer to the Poor Law Union, Rural Sanitary Authority and Rural District Council/ Arthur Sherlock is listed as Treasurer to Glossop Dale Rural District Council in Kelly's directory of 1932.
Some of the offices in 22 Henry Street were taken over by the Air Raid Welfare Local Supervising Committee, from 8th March, 1941, for use as an Air Raid Welfare Office. The Glossop Branch of the British Legion, the Hospital Collection Committee, the Citizens' Advice Bureau and the Fire Guard Staff Officer also used the premises during the second world war.

The various maps from 1857 to 1919 show small buildings to the east of Bank House. One of these was the coal office where Walter Thorp, coal merchant, had his business which is listed in directories from 1876 onwards.
Thorp's talents were not limited to the coal business. The list of local patents in the Derby Daily Telegraph of 19 April 1892 included the fact that a provisional specification had been accepted from Walter Thomas Thorp, Norfolk Square, for new or improved confectionery, on 29 January 1892.

Norfolk Chambers.

Norfolk Chambers runs westwards from the corner of Norfolk Street. Before the new Liberal Club (now the Partington Theatre) was built, the buildings also ran along the eastern side of Norfolk Square. Once again, numbering (where it is used at all) is confusing but it appears that the portion of the buildings along the south side of Henry Street included numbers 11 (now Goldline Taxis) and 9 Henry Street whilst it appears the buildings on the eastern side of Norfolk Square housed the addresses 14, 13, 12 and 11 Norfolk Square which were been demolished to make way for the Liberal Club.

The buildings were home to the Duke of Norfolk's Estate Office in the 1850s/60s. The Post Office directory of 1855 and White's directory of 1857 list Michael Ellison, esq. Agent; Charles John Hadfield, Surveyor to the Duke of Norfolk & manager of the Glossop waterworks; Francis Hawke managing clerk to the Duke of Norfolk, secretary/actuary to Savings bank, & agent to Manchester fire & Pelican life offices; and George Tomlinson George, wood steward & manager of the Glossop gas works.
The Estate Office was moved to Spire Hollin in the early part of 1865. Advertisements for payment of rents show that those due in 14 December 1864 were to be paid at Howardtown whilst those due in June 1865 (advertised 25 May 1865) were to be paid at Spire Hollin.

The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 8 August 1885 advertised 4 rooms at Norfolk Chambers to let which were suitable for offices. The contact was David Percival, the wine merchant. The issue of the newspaper of 17 October 1885 carried an advertisement for Allan Nicholson & Co, Stock & Share Brokers, Norfolk Square and that of 9 July 1887 (again giving Percival as contact) advertised that the office at 11B Norfolk Square, recently occupied by A Nicholson, was again to let.

No accurate start and finish dates has been found but the part of the property at the corner of Norfolk Street, next to Ellison & Co (later Lloyds Bank) was used as the public bar of the Norfolk Arms (the Norfolk Vaults).

Norfolk Chambers about 1935
This view shows Norfolk Chambers about 1935 with the Norfolk Vaults on the corner and Lloyds Bank partially obscured by the Coal Office.

Messrs Ellison & Co had taken Norfolk Chambers before 16 January 1888 as the Sheffield Independent of 18 January reported that there had been a fire the previous Monday at the premises. By 1906, Theodore Walter Ellison had formed a partnership with George Harrison Eaton Jones. Plans of proposed additions to the offices were approved on 31 July 1907.
Kelly's directory of 1908 listed Ellison & Jones as solicitors at Norfolk chambers. T. W. Ellison was town clerk and clerk to the county & borough magistrates and Glossop reservoir commissioners.
Kelly's directory of 1912 listed the same appointments for Ellison and the fact that Jones was Glossop Local Pension Committee Clerk.
The firm remained there until the mid 1920s, the final listing in a directory being Kelly's of 1925.

Norfolk Chambers was then taken over by Lloyds Bank Ltd., it being listed in Kelly's directories from 1928.

11 Henry Street.

Lewis Lister announced in the Derbyshire Times and Chesterfield Herald of 21 January 1854, that he was opening his printing business next door to the Duke's offices, Norfolk Square. He was listed as a bookseller, stationer, bookbinder & printer in the Post Office Directory of 1855 and a printer in White's directory of 1857. From research into early local newspapers (see Glossop's Early Local Newspapers) we know that he had moved to Bernard Street by 2 July 1859.

The Glossop Record of 14 June 1862 carried an advertisement for Thomas Wagstaffe, Practical architect, Auctioneer & Licensed valuer, giving his office address as Norfolk Square, next door to the estate offices. He was still there almost three years later as an advertisement in the Glossop Record of 25 February 1865 gives the same details.

The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 15 February 1873 contained a preliminary announcement, placed by Charles Higginbottom, of an auction of the shop, office and dwelling houses at 9 and 11 Norfolk Square. The advertisement was repeated for a number of weeks but, until the issue of 8 March, but no information has been found as to whether it actually took place.

In 1881 the property was occupied by the family of George William Bradbury, painter & decorator. He was the nephew of William Bradbury who is listed at Norfolk Square in the Post Office directory of 1876 and Morris's directory of 1878, having moved from Norfolk Street in about 1870. Unfortunately George's business failed as the Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser of 29 December 1884 reported that a receiving order had been made against George William Bradbury, bankrupt painter & paper hanger, Norfolk Square.
The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 5 March 1887 reported that R. W. Sykes was to sell the stock in trade of Messrs Bradbury, 11 Norfolk Square, and the issue of 26 March 1887 reported the opening of the shop of Wilkinson & Son, General Ironmongers, Oil & Lamp Merchants, Plumbers & Glaziers at 11 Norfolk Square, late Bradbury. Wilkinson & Son were also listed in Kelly's directory of 1888.

The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 12 September 1890 carried an advertisement for J. Hardman, Dentist, Norfolk Square. No number was given in the advertisement but Kelly's directory of 1891 lists him at 11 Norfolk square and 47 Norfolk street. This was the same John Hardman who had previously been in business at 1 High Street West and 3 Norfolk Square. Hardman was listed in directories up to Kelly's of 1912 but those from 1925 list George Brown. George was the son of the George Brown who had been caretaker at the Masonic Lodge. He worked for Robert George Hawke for 3 years 3 days as apprentice in the drawing office before leaving in 1901 to work for Hardman as trainee dentist. He bought the practice about 1919 when he returned from war service at Basra RAMC dental hospital.

9 Henry Street.

The 1861 census lists the occupant as William Lomas, Private night watchman (Glossop Hall). Ten years later he is still there, described as a Retired watchman. In the Glossop Record of 23 March 1867 he had advertised that “that large and commodious shop situate at the top of Norfolk Square, suitable for nearly any business” was to be let, though there is no detail of exactly which premises were meant.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 9 March 1872, Charles Higginbottom (auctioneer, value, insurance, emigration and estate agent) advertised that he had moved from 13 Norfolk Square to more convenient premises at 9 Norfolk Square. The advertisement stated that the premises had lately been occupied by Henry Reddish, solicitor, and “the Gentleman's Club”. That this was actually 9 Henry Street was indicated by the address given in advertisements for Higginbottom & Lees, Auctioneers, in June 1881. Charles Higginbottom had gone into partnership with Robert J. Lees on 1 November 1880.
The Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser of 10 January 1882 carried a notice that the partnership between Higginbottom & Lees had been dissolved on 3 January and that Robert Lees would carry on the business alone (Charles Higginbottom later resumed business from his home at 113 Victoria Street).

Advertisements in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter show that Robert Woolley Sykes, auctioneer & valuer, was the occupant from at least 18 August 1883. Kelly's directory of 1888 lists Robert Woolley Sykes of 9 Norfolk Square as a bailiff appointed under the Agricultural Holdings Act. In the directories of 1891 and 1895 he was listed as a certified bailiff under the Law of Distress Amendment Act. He died on 12 April 1898.

14 to 11 Norfolk Square.

The Glossop Record of 1 October 1870 carried an advertisement, from Charles Higginbottom of 13 Norfolk Square, for the sale by private contract of “All those two shops and Ginger beer Manufactory with Stable, Coach-house and other outbuildings situate Nos 11, 12, 13 and 14 Norfolk Square in the occupation of John Hampson, Messrs J & J Hibbert, Mr Charles Higginbottom and Messrs Sheppard & Taylor.”. The advertisement did not attract buyers as Charles Higginbottom advertised in the issue of 26 November that he had received instructions from John Hampson to sell the properties by auction on 14 December. No information about the result of the auction has been found.

14 Norfolk Square.

Sheppard & Taylor, mentioned in the sale notice of 1870, advertised in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 15 July 1871 that they were licensed to let Post Horses on hire to pleasure parties and others. No further mention of Taylor has been found but John Sheppard is listed in Kelly's directories of 1881 and 1888 as a mineral water manufacturer at 14 Norfolk Square.
Nothing later has been found.

13 Norfolk Square.

Various advertisements by Charles Higginbottom in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter from 27 August 1870 give his address as 13 Norfolk Square. As we have seen, he advertised on 16 March 1872 that he had moved to 9 Norfolk Square.
Nothing further has been found about number 13.

12 Norfolk Square.

A number of advertisements in the Glossop Record from 1863 to 1867 give the address of Henry Reddish, solicitor, as 12 Norfolk Square. It looks like it was after that when he moved to number 9 Henry Street. A native of Mottram, he also had offices there and in Manchester.

The Ashton Weekly Reporter, and Stalybridge and Dukinfield Chronicle of 24 October 1868 reported that the Poor Law Union offices were “being removed from Norfolk Street to more commodious premises in Norfolk Square”. The Union must have found the arrangement too expensive though as the same newspaper reported, on 13 November 1869 that the offices were to be moved to the workhouse to save money. The Norfolk Square offices were to be let for the residue of the unexpired lease.
The meeting of the Glossop Board of Guardians on 19 January 1870 was told that discussions had taken place with Mr. Hampson, the landlord, and he was willing to come to terms providing that the Guardians found him a suitable tenant. At the meeting on 2 March it was stated that all had been done that was required to the offices and that Mr Hibbert had removed to them. All that was needed was the surrendering of the lease, and then the Guardians would have done entirely with the old offices.

The decision must have been made too late to affect the publication of Harrod's directory of 1870 which listed Overseers’ Office, Norfolk square; Messrs Joseph Woodcock and T. P. Sykes; assistant-overseer, Mr John Swan; collector, Mr E. Hadfield, Whitfield, Glossop.

John and Joseph Hibbert were solicitors who also had premises in Hyde. The Post Office directory listing in 1876 provides the information that John Hibbert was also registrar and acted as high bailiff of the county court.
Morris's directory of 1878, in addition to listing the Hibbert solicitors practice, noted that the County Court Office was located there with Thomas Ellison, Esq., judge; John Hibbert, registrar and high bailiff; J. W. Bolton, assistant registrar and deputy high bailiff; and Robert Murray, clerk. By the time of Kelly's directory of 1881, Robert Murray had become assistant registrar & deputy high bailiff. He and his wife are recorded in the 1881 census as living at the County Court House.

Robert Murray was replaced by Albert Moore by the time the 1888 directory was published. Albert was recorded as county court clerk in the 1891 census, with an address of 12 Henry Street (despite that address also being used in the listing of Sarah Woodhead at the Post office).
In 1893, Thomas Michael Ellison, cousin of Judge Thomas Ellison (see Ellisons of Glossop Hall) had become registrar & high bailiff.

11 Norfolk Square.

The advertisement in the Glossop Record of 1 October 1870 indicates that John Hampson, who owned the four properties, was the occupant of number 11. In the Glossop Record in July 1861 he had advertised that “a large & commodious shop and house in Norfolk Square” was to let. Exactly which premises were not specified.

The 1871 census lists John Hampson, unemployed grocer, with Thomas White, a visitor, at number 11 Henry Street. Given that John Hampson was the owner of 11 Norfolk Square, it may be one of the several instances of the wrong address being recorded. John Hampson died on 11 December 1872 and probate of his will was granted to his widow, Mary Ann Hampson, in the following June. His father had died in 1857 and probate was granted to the executors in December that year but the estate was left unadministered and probate was re-granted to Joseph Hampson, his grandson, on 10 February 1887.

John Ford advertised, in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 28 January 1888, the auction of three lots, the first of which was two dwellings with shops, warehouses and outbuildings, fronting Norfolk Square in the occupation of J J Hibbert, James Kelly and another as tenants. Presumably this was numbers 12 and 11. James Kelly had formerly had the shop at 19 High Street West before it was sold on 6 August 1887. The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 20 September 1879 carried an advertisement for J. Kelly, Tailor & Woollen Draper, Norfolk Square so he was possibly there before opening in High Street.
R. W. Sykes advertised, in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 17 August 1889, that he had received instructions from James Kelly, outfitter, to sell all of his furniture &c.

In an advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 29 April 1898, Bagshaw & Fielding of Surrey Street announced that they had opened new premises in the Norfolk Arms Yard, Norfolk Mews. The premises had two means of access – between the Manchester & County Bank and the previous 11 Norfolk Square (office) and between the Manchester & County Bank and the Norfolk Arms on the south (vehicle access).
It may be that this development replaced the previous properties on the eastern side of Norfolk Square and along the southern side of Henry Street between the Square and Norfolk Chambers, as Bagshaw & Fielding used the buildings for stables.
The partnership of Arthur Bagshaw and Joseph Henry Fielding was dissolved on 8 February 1909. The business taken over by Glossop Carriage Company on 12 February.

Norfolk Square about 1903
Norfolk Square about 1903 (the diagonal paths are not laid out) showing some of the buildings (next to the entrance to Bagshaw & Fielding) which were replaced by the Liberal Club.

Liberal Club, Henry Street/Norfolk Square.

The building which is now the Partington Theatre Club, Henry Street replaced the previous 11 – 14 Norfolk Square (which appear to have been previously converted into stables).
Plans of new Liberal Club proposed to be erected in Norfolk Square and Henry Street, Glossop were approved on 9 February 1910 and the foundation stone was laid on 1 August 1914.

There are references to the Liberal Club, Henry Street, in earlier directories and local newspapers. This was the building on the corner of Edward Street & Railway Street, which was originally classed as being in Henry Street. Hamnett's tells us "The Temperance Hall, now the Liberal Club, was erected in 1850 by the Rechabite Club at a cost of £800; it was enlarged by an addition, St. James' Hall, now the High Peak Liberal Registration Offices."

Manchester & County Bank 1911
The Manchester & County Bank decorated for the 1911 coronation.
A sign in the window of Ellison & Jones, on Henry Street, can be seen between the bank and the lamp post.

The Manchester & County Bank (now the Nat West) was built in the late 1890s. The bank was first listed at that location in Kelly's directory of 1899.

Robert George Hawke, architect (son of Francis Hawke who had been the Duke's agent), is listed at Norfolk Square in the Kelly directories published between 1888 and 1900. The Trades directory of 1903 lists him at Bank Chambers, Norfolk Square. This was not Bank House on Henry Street but, as shown by a photograph taken when the tramway cabling was being installed, the western end of the Norfolk Arms (offices at the time), next to the entrance to Norfolk Mews.

Unidentified locations.

The following people are mentioned as having businesses in Henry Street or Norfolk Square but it has not been possible to identify the properties they occupied. It is possible that some occupied properties on the eastern side of Norfolk Square which were later demolished. Any further information will be gratefully received.

William Bennett, of Chapel en le Frith, was listed as a solicitor & clerk to the magistrates in Henry street in the Post Office directory of 1855 and White's directory of 1862. His son, Francis Grey Bennett, was appointed coroner for the high and low divisions of the county of Derby and is listed as having an office in Norfolk Square in White's directories of 1857 and 1862. Francis Grey Bennett died after a short illness in 1863 and William appears to have closed the Glossop office.

George Newton was a grocer at Henry Street between 1855 and 1861.

Henry Newton was listed as a tailor & draper in Henry Street in the Post Office directory 1855.

Mrs Sarah Smith had a berlin & fancy repository in Henry Street in 1855 and 1862.

Thomas & Watson, painters, gilders & paperhangers are listed as having premises in Henry Street & High Street in the Post Office directory 1855.

Levi Harrison was listed as a draper of Norfolk square in the Post Office directory of 1855 and White's of 1857.
Joseph Mycock succeeded him in July 1859.

Robert Longson was listed as a tailor, woollen & linen draper at Norfolk sq in 1855, and 1857. The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 1 September 1860 carried a notice of the auction of his stock as he was moving from the neighbourhood
A notice in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 3 November 1860 said that Thomas Jones, Draper, was reopening the shop (which he called Alma House) on 6 October. Thomas Jones was listed as a draper in the 1861 census and in White's directory of 1862.

Samuel Wagstaffe was listed as a beer retailer of Norfolk square in 1855. It is likely that he was the landlord of the Viaduct Inn (and previously of the Howard Arms) as, in 1861, he advertised to let a large and commodious house and shop in Norfolk Square, suitable for any business.

Joshua Wormald, boot & shoemaker, was recorded at Norfolk Square in 1855, 1857, the 1861 census and 1862.

A business named Dr Thompson's American Botanical Dispensary, of Norfolk Square, advertised in The Era of 12 October 1856 “wanted three lectures on Anatomy, Physiology, Botany &c”.

Sisters, Elizabeth & Eliza Lloyd were listed as milliners at Norfolk Square in White's directory of 1857. In the 1851 census they had been in business at 21 High Street West.

John Clarke, tailor & draper of Norfolk Square is listed in White's directory 1857, In 1859-61 he advertised in the Glossop Record, giving the address as Yorkshire House, Norfolk Square. He was recorded in the 1861 census but with an incomplete address. A notice of his bankruptcy was published in the London Gazette of 25 October 1861 but an advertisement in the Glossop Record of 5 July 1862 notified readers that he had opened up a new shop at High Street.

The Ashton Weekly Reporter, and Stalybridge and Dukinfield Chronicle of 5 June 1858 reported on a meeting of Howardtown Cottage Garden Society at the Tailor's Arms, Henry Street, run by Mr Barber. White's directory of 1857 listed a beerhouse named the Tailor's Arms at Charles Street, run by Joseph Barber who was also a tailor. It appears that he ran the beerhouse as a sideline. By the time of the 1861 census he was in Arundel Street and at the 1871 census he was a tailor in Edward Street.

In the Glossop Record of 15 December 1860, a warehouse at Littlemoor was advertised to let or sale, by Mr Hall, Tailor, Norfolk Square. John Hall was a tailor at 21 High Street West at the time so it may have been him.

George Platt, a butcher who had been in business at 19 High Street West, was recorded as a butcher at Norfolk Square in the 1861 census and as running a beerhouse as well as a butchery business in White's directory of 1862. In the Glossop Record of 18 October 1862 there was an advertisement for a plot of land and house/shop to be auctioned, the premises being occupied by George Platt, butcher.

In the Glossop Record of 5 June 1861, Thomas Maher, Boot & Shoe Manufacturer, advertised his shop next door to the County Court Office, Norfolk Square. At that time the office may have been in the Norfolk Arms.

White's directory of 1862 listed Anderson Dawson, boot & shoe maker, in, Norfolk square, John Finglah, manager.

Between 1861 and 1863, William Symes Wright (who was also listed in White's directory of 1862) advertised his business as an Iron & Tin-plate worker, gas fitter, brazier & general ironmonger, “Top of Norfolk Square”, so probably somewhere on Henry Street.

John Entwistle was listed as a broker at Norfolk Square in White's directory of 1862.

In the Glossop Record of 3 April 1869, William Eversden of Norfolk Square advertised that the shop occupied by George Doodson, draper, in Norfolk Square was to let. George Doodson had moved to High Street West, opposite Wesley Chapel, by 24 April.

An advertisement in the Derbyshire Times and Chesterfield Herald of 8 May 1869 stated that the Glossop Times was to be published from offices in Norfolk Square. Palmer & Edmunds, publishers of the Derbyshire Times, were listed as stationers, bookbinders, printers, and engravers at Norfolk square in Harrod's directory of 1870.

John Wood, pork butcher, Norfolk Square, advertised, starting in December 1869, to thank customers for their patronage of his business "so lately established", and announced that he had opened an eating house at the shop. He was also listed in Harrod's directory of 1870.

During 1875, and in 1891, the Higginbottom family advertised as The Exchange, 17 High Street West and Norfolk Square. Whether that means the family had a separate shop in Norfolk Square is not clear.

Edwin Wright, tailor & draper of Norfolk square, was listed in the Post Office directory of 1876 and Morris's directory of 1878. A notice of his bankruptcy was published in the Liverpool Mercury of 30 October 1878.

Charles Davis, who was to become one of Glossop's most prominent solicitors, was listed at 6 Norfolk square in Morris's directory of 1878 but it is unclear whether he used an office in the Schofields' property. Between 1878 and 1881, when he moved to Market Street, there are several references in newspapers to Charles Davis, Norfolk Square, but without a number being given.

The 1881 census listed John Ingerson, a tailor, at 9 Henry Street (which was occupied by Higginbottom & Lees at the time) whilst Kelly's directory of that year listed him at 9 Norfolk Square so it is unclear which property was referred to. He was the brother of William Ingerson, who had traded from 1 Norfolk square and other premises. He had moved his business to Cross Street by the time the Kelly's directory of 1888 was issued.

Kelly's directory of 1888 listed a Richard Sheppord Butterfield as running a high school in Norfolk Square.

During 1901, Glossop FC advertised season tickets on sale at the office, Henry Street.

During 1905, the Exors of J H Parkinson Ltd. advertised false teeth, “over Hepworth's, Norfolk Square”. This may well have been an error and should have been Norfolk Street.



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Last updated: 16 January 2022