An Early History of High Street West, Glossop, between Railway Street and Arundel Street.


This article attempts to document the occupants of High Street West, between Railway Street and Arundel Street, for about a hundred years from the 1840s, using available records in censuses, directories and newspapers. Any additional information and/or corrections will be gratefully received.
I must acknowledge the help of Lynda Meehan and Mike Brown in preparing this article and for allowing me to use photos from their collections.

ca 1922
High Street West looking west in the early 1920s

The way in which entries were recorded in the 1841, 1851 and 1861 censuses (the 1871 one being the first to have property numbers) makes it difficult to identify occupation of High Street West at the time. Another source of confusion is that some premises were listed as Howardtown and it is often not possible to establish exactly where they were. However, by comparison of entries in the censuses with later records it has been possible to identify a few occupants. A similar problem occurred in 1901 because of the enumerator not using property numbers and/or using inaccurate ones.

The identification of properties on this side of High Street West is further complicated by the rebuilding which took place at times within the period covered. One instance is that number 6 and 8 may have started out as a single property. Another is that numbers 14 and 16 appear to have originally been 12 and 14 (which was described as one door above McMellon's tailor (number 18) in 1875) and were renumbered when number 12 was built.

Extract from 1857 map
          
Extract from 1879 map
          
Extracts from 1857 and 1879 maps showing layouts of 6 to 16 High Street West.

4 High Street West

This property appears to be a later addition onto the corner of Railway Street. The first mention found of it as an address in its own right was in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 16 May 1913 when Swire's (of 6 and 8 High Street West) advertised that the corner lock-up shop at 4 High Street West was to let.

Kelly's directory of 1925 lists Harry Johnson, fruiterer, there whilst that of 1928 lists Andrew Deakin's creamery

The occupant in the Kelly directories of 1932, 1936 and 1941 was the tripe dressing business of Ralph Wild and Sons.

6 (and 6a/6b) High Street West

The position of the entry for Joseph Oates and his family (see The Oates family of Handsworth and Glossop) in High Street in the 1851 census suggests that he was at number 6. The obituary of Robert Braddock (see below) confirms that, in 1852, Joseph occupied the shop next door to that tenanted by John Swire in 1885. He appears to have moved there after giving up the Albion Hotel on Victoria Street in 1845, being listed in Bagshaw's directory of 1846, the Post Office directory of 1849 and Slater's of 1850 at Howard Town. In addition to being an auctioneer and accountant he was inspector of weights & measures and postmaster. By the time the Post Office directory of 1855 was compiled he had become high bailiff to the County Court.

The 1861 census appears to provide the first record of number 6 being in multiple occupation. The last entry on the enumerator's walk which ended at the corner of High Street West and Railway Street was for the family of John Dewsnap. As he was a tailor, he was possibly the son of Valentine Dewsnap (see Dewsnap family of Glossop). The preceding entry was for Joseph Oates, by then a widower, and his housekeeper.

No further record has been found of John Dewsnap's family. Joseph Oates moved to number 84 later in the decade, though no record has been found of exactly when.

The property was occupied at the time of the 1871 census by William Brooks, a greengrocer, and his family. They had been there for at least three years by then as William was mentioned as trading in High Street West in a report in the Glossop Record of 18 April 1868. A report on revision of the burgess list in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 9 October 1875 indicates that the family had recently moved round the corner to Railway Street.

The 1881 census recorded the family of Hugh Kinder, a cotton slasher, at number 6. Hugh's son, John James Kinder, was listed as a butcher there in the Post Office directory of 1876, Morris's directory of 1878 and Kelly's directory of 1881.

No record had been found for when the Kinder family left but, in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 8 January 1887, Arthur Patchett advertised that 6 High Street West (corner of Railway Street) was to be opened on Wednesday 12 January as a butcher's shop. Arthur was a son of Abraham and Margaret Patchett, butcher at 36 High Street West, and grandson of George and Sarah Patchett who had been butchers at 5 High Street East (see An Early History of numbers 1 to 25 High Street East, Glossop).

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 21 May 1887, George Patchett, Arthur's older brother, advertised that he was opening a tea & coffee merchant business in the premises using the address 6a High Street West. Both Arthur and George were listed in Kelly's directory of 1888, the address for George being printed as 6b.

An advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 3 April 1890 announced that Alfred Crannage, watch & clock maker, had moved from 30 High Street West to 6a High Street West, late in the occupation of G. Patchett. It appears that George had moved back to number 36 to assist his widowed mother in the butchery business.

In the 1891 census number 6 is recorded twice, firstly the record of Arthur and family and secondly as unoccupied (presumably 6a). Kelly's directory of 1891 and the Post Office directory of 1895 both list Arthur Patchett at number 6 and Alfred Crannage at 6a but Bulmer's directory of 1895 lists only Alfred. The possible reason is that Arthur's business was failing, as an advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 1 November 1895 stated that Mr Josiah Mellor would sell by auction at the shop of Mr Arthur Patchett, 2 (sic) High Street West, on Monday 4 November, the Tripe dressing utensils &c and a quantity of household furniture. No further record has been found of Arthur being in business at number 6 and in the 1901 census the family was living at 12 Queen Street with Arthur as a journeyman butcher.

Alfred Crannage died, aged 64, on 13 September 1898. The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 18 November 1898 carried an advertisement stating that the business of Alfred Crannage, 6 High Street West, would be carried on as usual. Kelly's directories of 1899 and 1900 list Mrs Mary Crannage, watch & clock maker, 6 High Street West. The business was listed in the Trades directory of 1903 under Alfred's name with an address of 6A High Street West but may have already closed (or been about to close) as John Swire's business was listed in the same directory at 6 and 8 High street West. Mary Crannage died, aged 78, in December 1907.

The Trades directory of 1903 lists John Swire & Sons as using number 6 together with number 8. An advertisement from Swire & Sons in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 4 November 1904 stated that the lock up shop, next to Central Stores, High Street West was to let. It appears they had no takers as Kelly's directory of 1908 listed John Swire & Son, boot & shoe makers & leather sellers as still using both shops. However, about a year later, it was reported in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 16 July 1909 that 6 High Street West, the former butcher's shop, was the headquarters of the Votes for Women campaign. That was obviously short lived as the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 6 August 1909 included an advertisement from Mowbray & Co, Fish Merchants of Glossop, saying that they would open their premises at 6 High Street West the following day.

How long Mowbray & Co lasted is unknown as no record has been found after 27 August 1909. In the 1911 census 6 and 6b were recorded as lock up shops, and Swires again advertised number 6 to let in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 15 September 1911. Swires were again listed in Kelly's directory of 1912.

The next occupant found is in Kelly's directories of 1928 and 1932 when the shop was used by Edward Andrew, confectioner. The business was taken over by Mrs Doris Edith Bebbington, who was listed in Kelly's directory of 1936. The 1939 register recorded Francis H. Dawson, Sweets & tobacco dealer, with his wife Bertha. In Kelly's directory of 1941, the listing was in Bertha's name.

Advertisement for Andrew's 1927
Advertisement for Andrew's 1927

8 High Street West

His entries being next to Joseph Oates identifies John Minshull as the occupier, with his family, at the times of the 1851 and 1861 censuses. He was also recorded at Howard Town in the 1841 census. He was described in census records as a mechanic whilst the various directories between 1842 and 1862 describe him as a clock & watch maker. John Minshull died, aged 70, in November 1866 and was buried at Whitfield.

The next occupant appears to have been Edwin Winterbottom, butcher, who seems to have moved his family from number 48 just under three years earlier, having advertised that shop as to let in the Glossop Record between 10 February and 26 May 1866. In the Glossop Record of 13 February 1869, John France advertised the auction of the furniture and other effects at the premises of Edwin Winterbottom. The family was recorded in Gorton in the 1871 census.

In the Glossop Record of 20 February 1869, Edward Dewsnap (son of John of Hadfield, see Dewsnap family of Hadfield) advertised that he had taken the shop lately occupied by Edwin Winterbottom at Railway Street, High Street. He only seems to have lasted a few months, last advertising on 12 June 1869.

In December 1869, John Swires (sic), boot, shoe, clog & patten maker, placed two advertisements in the Glossop Record. In the issue of 18 December 1869 he advertised that he had moved to more extensive premises near the corner of Railway Street and High Street West. A week later he announced that he had moved to the shop lately occupied by Mr. Edwin Winterbottom, opposite Mr. Kelley's (sic), clothier, only two doors from Norfolk Square. He previously traded at number 28 but must have moved somewhere else in between as his successor was at number 28 by 13 January 1866.

John advertised, in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 22 March 1884 that business had been so successful that he had enlarged his shop. John died in 1888 but his successors, the firm of John Swire & Son, occupied the premises for many decades, being recorded in all the available directories up to 1941.

For most of the period the shop was a lock up but John's son Thomas, with his family, were recorded as occupying it at the time of the 1901 census. As noted above, the family used both number 8 and number 6 in the early years of the twentieth century but were listed at number 8 alone in the Kelly directories of 1925 to 1941.

The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 24 February 1877 reported that a wooden structure had been under construction for some weeks adjoining Mr Swire's clog shop. No records have been found that establish exactly where the structure was located but it had been built to accommodate a photographic studio for a Mr McLeod. J. McLeod advertised his studio in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 11 August 1877 but no other records have been found of the business. It appears that the “wooden structure” did remain in use for some years though. In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 22 January 1892, Swire & Son advertised that the photographic studio, lately occupied by Mr. Shaw and suitable for an office, was to let. No record has been found of any further tenancy.

Advertisement for Swire's 1901
Advertisement for Swire's 1901

10 High Street West

Joshua Simcock, an earthenware dealer, was recorded at number 10 in the 1871 census. The order of entries in 1861 suggests he was in the same property. He was recorded at Howard Town in 1851 but it is not certain, from order of entries, that he was in the same property. Joshua Simcock died aged 86 on 13 February 1878 and was buried in the graveyard at Top Chapel, Charlesworth. Buried in the same grave was his daughter, Martha Stafford, wife of Joseph, who died aged 54 on 10 May 1881. Listings in the Post Office directory of 1876, Morris's of 1878 and Kelly's of 1881 indicate that the business had been taken over by Joseph and Martha Stafford (who were also recorded as residents in the 1881 census).

No record has been found of when Joseph Stafford left but his successor was apparently one Jonathan Beech. He advertised in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 5 November 1887 that he was leaving the neighbourhood, so his stock of glass, china &c was to be sold by Christmas, sale commencing 7 November at 10 High Street West. In the newspaper of 31 December 1887 he advertised that he had moved to Stockport.

Crowther Campbell Walker, who had been landlord of the Britannia Inn at 38/40 High Street West for about about four years until 1887, was the next occupant. He was listed in Kelly's directory of 1891 as a confectioner and, with his family, as resident of number 10 at the time of the 1891 census.

By the time the two directories of 1895 were compiled, number 10 was occupied by the family of Frederick Leach, who was described as a pie maker in the Post Office directory and as a baker by Bulmer. Fred was also a colour sergeant and long service medallist in the Glossop Volunteers. The family was recorded at the property in the 1901 census but it appears that something then went wrong, possibly Fred falling ill. An advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 27 September 1901 stated that, for the benefit of his creditors and to the instructions of Mrs Mary Hannah Leach, John T. Goddard would sell by auction on Wednesday 2 October 1901 the whole of the stock in trade &c of the chip potato and bakery business lately carried on by Mr & Mrs Frederick Leach at 10 High Street West. The shop and house were advertised to let, by Swire & Sons, 8 & 6 High Street West, in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 11 October 1901. The family moved to Dinting where Frederick Riddle Leach died, aged only 46, on 11 October 1902.

The next record found for number 10 was in Kelly's directory of 1908 when Fred Howard was listed as a hair dresser & tobacconist. By 3 February 1911, the business had been taken over by Francis Hazelwood, who advertised in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of that date. Also living in the property at the time of the 1911 census was his widowed father, Francis Hazelwood senior, a stationary engine tenter in a cotton mill. Frank Hazelwood was in business for a considerable time, being listed in the directories up to Kelly's of 1928, before moving to Edward Street.

The listings in Kelly's directories of 1932 and 1936 were for Adams Stores Ltd. hardware dealers. By the time of the 1941 directory, the shop was occupied by Frank Brine, butcher.

Advertisement for George Hyde's 1901
Advertisement for George Hyde's 1901

12 High Street West

As noted above, number 12 is a later building, erected in a gap left between number 10 and (the current) number 14. When the property was put up for auction in 1904 it was stated that the lease of 999 years ran from 1895, indicating that the first tenant was probably George Hyde, milliner and fancy draper, listed in the Post Office and Bulmer directories of 1895. He had previously been in business at 7 High Street East but had given up that shop following a fire in 1900 that was not fully covered by insurance. George was the subject of a court case reported in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 23 June 1893 but it gave his address simply as High Street West, without a number.

In addition to George Hyde, Kelly's directories of 1899 and 1900 list John Thomas Whitham, photographer, at number 12. He used a studio above the shop before converting his news agency at 60 High Street West into a printing establishment in 1901. In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 27 September 1901, John Whitham advertised that he had set up a new photographic studio at 87 High Street West and no longer had any connection with the studio over Mr George Hyde's shop. Two weeks later, in the newspaper of 11 October 1901, J. W. Battey & Sons of Hadfield announced that they had taken over the old established photographic studio over Mr. Hyde's shop. No record has been found of when Batteys gave up the studio. However, in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 29 September 1905, Swire & Sons advertised the Photographic Studio (suitable for office) to let.

As referred to above, the property was put up for auction on 25 October 1904. No report of the auction has been found (probably because the newspaper was full of articles about the local election at the time) but it was not long before George Hyde gave up the shop. Swires, 6 & 8 High Street West, advertised in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 10 February 1905 that 12 High Street West, lately occupied by Mr. Hyde, was to let. It appears that George and his wife, Agnes, moved to number 50 High Street West as she was listed there in Kelly's directory of 1908 (see below).

An advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 26 April 1907 gave the address of the Glossop Cycle Co as 12 High Street West. The company had traded at 48 High Street West for some years (see below) though advertisements in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter between 1 February and 19 April 1907 gave an address of 74 High Street (presumably High Street East, which had formerly been a cycle shop, as Mary Eyre was still trading at 74 High Street West). By the time Kelly's directory of 1908 was compiled, the company had become the Glossop Cycle & Motor Co. At the time of the 1911 census the premises were described as a shop & motor shed, and home to the family of Walter Fielding, Motor & cycle dealer.

The Cycle & Motor company was listed in Kelly's directory of 1912 but, at some time before 1921, the shop was occupied by the Co-op and became their Gents outfitters branch, being listed in all the directories to 1941. Some of the directory entries had the inaccurate number of 14 but photographs show that the shop was at number 12.

Advertisement for Glossop Cycle & Motor Co. ca 1910
Advertisement for Glossop Cycle & Motor Co. ca 1910

14 High Street West (originally 12)

The first occupant who can be identified with certainty is Mary Buckley, confectioner, who was recorded in the 1871 census. The date she moved in has not been found but she was mentioned as a shopkeeper in High Street West in reports in the Glossop Record and the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 10 December 1870. The reports indicate that she was also a tobacconist.

No record has been found of when the property changed hands but the Post Office directory of 1876 and Morris's of 1878 list Thomas Bramhall, milliner. He was not there long as William Fielding, grocer, was listed in Kelly's directory of 1881 and recorded, with his family, in the 1881 census. The directory also listed him as having a shop at 32 High Street West.

William Fielding was also not at number 12 very long as by 27 September 1884, Walter Oliver, General ironmonger, was advertising his business at 12 High Street West. Walter was there for an even shorter time. In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 21 November 1885 he advertised number 12 to let. It didn't go immediately as Walter had to advertise again in the newspapers of 26 December 1885 and 9 January 1886. He appears to have moved across the road to number 39 by the end of April as John Swire advertised number 12 (next door to Dr. Andrew's) to let in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 1 May 1886.

The next record found for the property is in Kelly's directory of 1888 which lists William Torkington, corn & flour dealer & family grocer, with shops at both 12 High Street West and 31 Station road, Hadfield. No record has been found of when he took the shop. It was during William Torkington's tenancy that the property numbers changed. In Kelly's directory of 1891 he was listed at number 12 and in the two 1895 directories he was listed at number 14. The Bulmer directory gave the manager's name as Joel Wood. We know when William left number 14 because he advertised, in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 23 August 1895, that he had succeeded to the business of W. H. Bottomley at 11 High Street East (see An Early History of numbers 1 to 25 High Street East, Glossop.).

In addition to William Torkington, Kelly's directory of 1891 listed Thomas Samuel Shaw, photographer, at 12 High Street West. He had moved on by the end of the year as Swire & Son advertised, in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 15 January 1892, that the photographic studio lately occupied by Mr. Shaw, High Street West, suitable for an office, was available to let.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 5 April 1895, R. W. Sykes advertised that leasehold property of the late John Swire, two shops & dwelling houses High Street West, with stable and other outbuildings adjoining (referred to as numbers 12 and 14) and three dwellings in Spire Hollin would be auctioned on 16 April. The High Street West properties were in the occupation of Dr. Andrew and Mr William Torkington as tenants. It was reported in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 19 April 1895 that they sold for £1,420 to Mr George Ollerenshaw (Consumers' Tea Company) of Blackburn and formerly Glossop.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 4 September 1896, Heywood & Son, Practical Bootmakers, thanked the people of Glossop for their patronage since opening their new branch at 14 High Street West. Unfortunately they didn't say how long they had been open. Neither have there been any records found of when they left but Kelly's directories of 1899 and 1900 list William G. Griffiths, boot & shoe maker, at number 14.

The property then became home to a confectionery business run by Ellen Tetlow and her husband, James (listed as a print engraver in the 1901 census). As with other tenants they didn't last long, advertising, in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 9 May 1902, High Class confectionery business for disposal, doing good trade.

John Herbert Lord is listed in Kelly's directory of 1908 as a confectioner. He probably moved to number 14 in 1902/3 as he was recorded at either 28 or 30 High Street West (see below) in the 1901 census but not listed in the 1903 Trades directory. The Lord family were at number 14 until after 1912 (listed in Kelly's directory of that year) but were recorded at number 16 in the 1921 census so swapped premises with Dr. Peter Malloch at some time between those dates.

Peter Edward Malloch L.R.C.P. & S.Edin., L.R.F.P.S.Glas. physician & surgeon (who lived at 84 St. Mary’s Road) had his consulting rooms listed at 14 High Street West in each of Kelly's directories from 1925 to 1941.

Advertisement for Lord's 1904
Advertisement for Lord's 1904

16 High Street West (originally 14)

The positioning of the entries in the 1851 and 1861 censuses suggest that the occupant of this property was James Newton, greengrocer, with his family. He was also listed as a baker and confectioner in White's directory of 1857. In the Glossop Record of 31 October 1863, and subsequently, James Newton advertised that his “excellent pot shop, house, bakehouse and warehouse” was to let. He was not successful in letting the property as an advertisement in the Glossop Record of 25 February 1865 stated that Charles Newton (James's son) had commenced the business of baker, confectioner &c opposite Mr. W. Smith, boot & shoe maker. The family appears to have been still in the property when James died on 9 August 1870, he being described as a grocer and baker of High Street in his obituary. Charles had moved his business to Chapel Street by the time of the 1871 census.

The occupant in the 1871 census was Amos May, Basket Maker. He had moved, probably to Victoria Street where he is found in the 1881 census, within four years as an advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 15 May 1875 announced that Swires & Kay had opened a new boot & shoe mart at 14 High Street West, one door above McMellon's tailor. This appears to have been a venture between John Swire of number 8 and Jacob Kay, his father in law. Jacob was the owner of the Junction Inn at the time but had let it to Tom Dutton who was granted a temporary license at Glossop Police Court on 30 March 1875. Jacob's eldest daughter Mary Ellen had married John Swire on 22 September 1874. When the “shop at 14 High Street West in occupation of Swire & Kay” was advertised as to let in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 7 July 1877, application was to be made to John Swire, High Street West. This was presumably when Jacob Kay moved to number 58 (see below).

The property was then taken by Doctor Albert Andrew as his residence and his consulting rooms. The first record of him was found in Morris's directory of 1878. The number changed from 14 to 16 between the entries in Kelly's directories of 1888 and 1891. Dr. Andrew was also medical officer for Glossop Union. As noted above, the property was sold at auction on 16 April 1895.

Albert Andrew died after a long illness, aged 46, on 13 November 1898. His practice, and number 16, were taken on by Doctor Arthur Walker, who was for a time public vaccinator for Glossop union. Dr. Walker was recorded with his wife and household in the 1911 census and in Kelly's directories up to 1912.

As we have seen above, at some time before 1921 Dr Walker swapped premises with Herbert Lord's family. John Herbert Lord died at Colwyn Bay on 2 May 1944, having moved there in the 1930s. He had retired in 1928, his son Herbert Vernon Lord taking over the business, which was listed at the property in each of the directories to 1941, closing around 20 years later.

18 High Street West

The position of his entry in the 1861 census suggests that John Kelly, master tailor, occupied number 18. He is listed in the Post Office directory of 1855 and White's directory of 1857 but White's of 1862 lists his son James. When he advertised in the Glossop Record of 18 February 1865 that he had moved across the road next door to Mr. Wormald's, boot & shoe maker (number 29) he did so simply as J. Kelly, tailor and boys' & youths' clothier.

William McMellon, tailor, and his family, must have moved to number 18 before 8 July 1865 because Fielding's jewellers had moved into his previous shop, number 24, by that date. The family continued to trade from the premises for about 40 years, though William and his wife Ann (with two of their children) moved to Edward Street before the time of the 1881 census when son Henry was recorded, with his own family, as the occupant of number 18. The business was listed in directories in William's name up to the Trades directory of 1903.

After Henry McMellon retired, the business was taken over by John Furniss who was listed in Kelly's directories of 1908 and 1912 as a draper and recorded with his wife, Clara, and mother in law in the 1911 census. An advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 3 January 1913 announced that Miss Bruckshaw had taken over the Ladies' & Gents' outfitter lately carried on by Mr. J. Furniss at 18 High Street West. John Furniss had emigrated to New Zealand with the intention of Clara joining him later but joined the New Zealand army after war broke out and was killed in action on 25 August 1918 (see Here.).

Nellie Bruckshaw was the daughter of the steward of the Liberal Club on the corner of Edward Street and Railway Street. She married Harold Kersey Entwistle on 24 February 1914. Nellie was listed as a fancy draper in Kelly's directories of 1925 to 1936 but died on 9 May 1937. Harold had been listed as a photographic dealer in the 1932 and 1936 directories and had the same description in the 1941 directory. Described as a photographic dealer and tobacconist, he was recorded at number 18 with his son and daughter in the 1939 register. He died on 28 June 1948.

Advertisement for the two Entwistle businesses 1926
Advertisement for the two Entwistle businesses 1926

20 High Street West

Once again, the positions of the entries on the enumerators' sheets have indicated that the family of George and Elizabeth Fielding, watchmakers, were the occupants of number 20 in 1851 and 1861 (though George died on 2 March 1854). The business was listed under George's name in the Post Office directory of 1849 and Slater's of 1850, and under Elizabeth's name in the Post Office directory of 1855 and White's of 1857 and 1862. Elizabeth died in 1865 and in the Glossop Record of 15 July 1865, their son Enoch advertised that he was continuing the business of his mother, the late Mrs. E. Fielding, and removing to the shop lately occupied by Mr. M'Mellon (sic), opposite to Messrs. J. Ashton & Son (number 24).

John Wilson, shoemaker, and his wife Hannah had moved to number 20 from Edward Street by the time Harrod's directory of 1870 was compiled. John died, aged 46, on 3 February 1877. Hannah carried on the business for four years but advertised in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 12 March 1881 that the old established boot & shoe warehouse, 20 High Street West, was to be disposed of with immediate possession available.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 21 May 1881, James Nield, Boot and shoe maker (see Nields of Chunal and Dinting), advertised that he had removed from 9 Victoria Street to 20 High Street West, lately occupied by Mrs Wilson. James ran the business until he died on 9 December 1899. The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 22 December 1899 carried an advertisement stating that the business would be carried on as usual as James Nield & Son. John Robinson Nield, only child of James was listed in directories up to Kelly's of 1912

By the time Kelly's directory of 1925 was compiled the premises had been occupied by Barclays Bank Limited (see The First Hundred Years of Banking in Glossop). Three years later number 20 had become a butcher's shop, Kelly's directory of 1928 listing Edward Slack, pork butcher.

The shop was then taken over by Thomas Walter Weston, who was listed as a cooked meat dealer in Kelly's directories of 1932 and 1936 and as a pork butcher in the 1941 directory. He was recorded as living in the premise with his wife and son in the 1939 register.

22 High Street West

In the Glossop Record of 3 March 1860, James Brocklehurst advertised hs business as a confectioner, seedsman and dealer in British Wines as being located opposite John Ashton & Sons, High Street (number 41). In the 1861 census, James was recorded as a rope maker, his wife Betsy being the confectioner. James was listed in White's directory of 1862 but no further record of the family has been found.

The occupants at the time of the 1871 census were John Harrop, a draper, and his wife Sarah Ann. John had been listed in Harrod's directory of 1870 as a tailor and draper. Sarah Ann died in April 1874 and James remarried the following November to Ruth Ellis. The couple continued in business until John died in February 1891. Ruth was recorded in the 1891 census as a dressmaker but then sold up.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 29 May 1891, Samuel Beeley, draper, announced his new address as 22 High Street West. He had moved from 18 High Street East on the expiry of his lease. Samuel was listed in both the Post Office and Bulmer directories of 1895 but vacated the premises that year.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 13 September 1895, Albert Sidebottom, a local band leader, announced that he had opened a Pianoforte, Organ and Music Warehouse at number 22. Unlike his predecessors, the tenancy of Albert Sidebottom was a long one, being listed in all the directories up to Kelly's of 1932.

Kelly's directories of 1936 and 1941 inform us that the shop was taken over by Frank Edmund Needham as a wireless dealership. He also had a battery engineering workshop in Oak Street.

Advertisement for Sidebottom's 1904
Advertisement for Sidebottom's 1904

24 High Street West

Identifying William McMellon as the occupant of this property was easier than relying on the position of the entry in the 1861 census because of his being succeeded by Enoch Fielding in 1865, as noted above. The first record of William was in the Post Office directory of 1855.

As we have seen, Enoch Fielding, Clock & watch maker, moved from number 20 to number 24 in July 1865. When he died, in 12 July 1892, the business was taken over by his son Henry. He ran the business from the same shop until buying number 39 High Street West at auction in February 1903 and moving there at the beginning of July that year.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 17 July 1903, William Taylor, butcher, advertised that he would open a shop at number 24 on Thursday 23 July. In an auction on 13 June 1910, William Taylor bought the shop at 74 Victoria Street, together with several other properties, for £1,150. He announced that he had moved to 74 Victoria Street in an advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 5 August 1910.

A week earlier, in the newspaper of 29 July 1910, Harry Wild advertised that he had taken over the butchering business of W. Taylor at 24 High Street West. He was recorded in the 1911 census living at the property with Jane Wild, his widowed mother, his siblings & his grandmother and was listed in Kelly's directory of 1912.

The shop then became Blackburn's tailors. They advertised for a “smart lad” in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 7 March 1913. They ran a series of advertisements for the business in the newspapers over the next couple of years, the last found being in the issue of 2 April 1915.

By the time Kelly's directory of 1925 was compiled, the shop had been taken over by Melia’s Limited, grocers, previously at 5 High Street West. The company was listed at number 24 in the subsequent directories of 1928, 1932, 1936 and 1941.

Advertisement for Taylor's 1904
Advertisement for Taylor's 1904

26 to 34 High Street West

The shops numbered 26 to 34 High Street West (plus the cottage numbered 34a at the rear and outbuildings belonging to the properties) were offered for sale by auction on 5 April 1898, by order of the executors of the late Mr James Collier. The property was held for the residue of a term of 99 years from 29 September 1824. The lot was withdrawn when it failed to attract sufficient bids. This was James Collier, born ca 1832, who was recorded as a greengrocer and fishmonger at 34 High Street West, not the one born in 1827 whose family were publicans at the Commercial, Glossop. He died on 8 December 1897 when living in Hugh Street, Glossop.

In his Local Events of the Past column in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 19 November 1909, Robert Hamnett wrote that 18 November 1824 was the date of lease of numbers 30 & 32 High Street West, built by Samuel Waterhouse, labourer, of Whitfield, in the "Far Flat and New Meadow".

26 High Street West

The occupant at the time of the 1851 and 1861 censuses was Elizabeth Barnes, usually recorded as Betty. She was also listed in the directories from 1850 to 1862. Betty died in March 1869 but had given up the shop some years earlier.

In the Glossop Record of 13 January 1866, Charles Crompton, Cabinet Maker, advertised his shop in High Street, next door to Mr. Entwistle, Gutta Percha Shoe Dealer. He previously had a shop in Chapel Street. Charles Crompton was to remain in business as a Cabinet Maker at number 26 until he died on 28 August 1891. After Charles died, the business was continued by his widow, Elizabeth, until her death on 22 September 1894. The early compilation of directories meant that she was listed as a furniture dealer at number 26 in Bulmer's of 1895.

In 1874, Charles had gone into partnership with William Elliott (whose wife, Alice, was Elizabeth's sister) as undertakers. In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 7 March 1874, Crompton & Elliott, 26 High Street West, advertised that they had commenced the business of general undertaking and funeral furnishing. By the time of Morris's directory of 1878 they were hearse and mourning coach proprietors, with addresses at Surrey Street (William and Alice's home), Norfolk stables, and 26 High Street West. By the time Kelly's directory of 1891 was compiled the company had become Crompton, Elliott & Co., Charles and William having been joined by Arthur Bagshaw (Elizabeth's nephew and formerly Charles's apprentice) and Joseph Henry Fielding. A notice was published in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 10 April 1891 to say that William Elliott had left the partnership by mutual consent and that Charles, Arthur and Joseph would continue the business as Crompton and Company. The company became Bagshaw and Fielding following Elizabeth's death.

Subsequent directory entries list Arthur Bagshaw as a cabinet maker at number 26 with Bagshaw & Fielding listed there and at Surrey Street stables. Joseph had moved with his family to 69 Surrey Street after William moved with his family from there to Victoria Street. In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 19 August 1898, Bagshaw & Fielding of 26 High Street West and 69 Surrey Street announced that they had opened new premises in Norfolk Mews (see The Early Development of Shops and Businesses of Norfolk Square and Henry Street, Glossop). The partnership of Bagshaw & Fielding lasted until 8 February 1909 when it was dissolved prior to the business being taken over by Glossop Carriage Company three days later, at which time Joseph became Managing Funeral Director of the Carriage Company.

At the same time, Arthur had expanded the cabinet making and furniture dealing business. In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 26 February 1904, he advertised that he had built new workshops, including drying apparatus, for cabinet making at 26 High Street West. Three months later he had expanded to take over number 28, the two shops being listed together in all the directories up to 1941. After Arthur died on 2 August 1924 the business passed to his wife Sarah. When she died in November 1933 their son Stephen took over the business of A. Bagshaw & Son. Stephen was listed, with his brother Arthur, at numbers 26 & 28 in the 1939 register.

Advertisement for Bagshaw & Fielding 1901
Advertisement for Bagshaw & Fielding 1901

28 High Street West

The position of the entry in the 1851 census points to George Georgeson, cloth cap maker, being the occupant at that time. He had been listed in Slater's directory of 1850 and was also listed in the Post Office directory of 1855 and White's of 1857 before moving to number 29 on the other side of the road.

That move must have been before 5 November 1859 as that date is when the first advertisement for Robert Green, clogger, appeared in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter. Robert lasted less than a year as an advertisement appeared in the Glossop Record of 25 August 1860 stating that about 500 pairs of good second hand clogs were to be sold by auction on Saturday 1 September 1860 at the shop of Robert Green, Clogger, High Street.

A week later the Glossop Record advertised that John Swire intended opening the Clog Establishment lately carried on by Robert Green near the Market Hall, High Street. The position of the entry for John Swire, boot & shoe maker, in the 1861 census indicates that he occupied number 28. John must have moved on before 13 January 1866 because, as we have seen, Charles Crompton's advertisement of that date stated that his neighbour was Mr. Entwistle. Exactly when John Swire moved, and where to, has not been discovered because the next record found for him, as mentioned above, is when he moved to number 8 in 1869.

John Entwistle, gutta-percha boot and shoemaker, was listed at High street in Harrod's directory of 1870 and is recorded as the occupant, with his wife and children, of number 28 in the 1871 census. He died in November 1873. When his family moved out has not been discovered.

The next record found for the property was in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 31 March 1877 when Moses Lowe announced that he had opened 28 High Street West (opposite Mr. Parker, Chemist) as a boots & shoes dealership. His advertisement of 16 June indicates that he had also become landlord of the Bush Inn, Bernard Street, by then. The final advertisement found for the boot & shoe business appeared in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 14 July 1877.

Morris's directory of 1878 lists both Moses Lowe and Mrs. Eliza Brain, draper, at 28 High Street West, which indicates that the change of occupier occurred late in 1877 or early 1878. Eliza (listed as Elizabeth in Kelly's directory of 1881, which also listed her son Henry William Brain as a watch maker) was recorded as a widow in the 1881 census, along with Henry and his older brother George. Eliza had previously been in business at number 48 High Street West. She remarried to Joseph Walton of 6 Cooper Street at St. James', Whitfield on 27 April 1886 and they moved the drapery business to 52 High Street West.

The next occupant was Charles Burkhard who was listed as a pork butcher in Kelly's directory of 1888. He wasn't there long as he advertised in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 20 July 1889 that he was moving from 28 High Street West to 87 High Street West.

The next record found is in Kelly's directory of 1891, which listed Job Pickford, confectioner. In the 1891 census he was recorded as a tobacconist & sweet dealer but he was on the move soon afterwards as the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 29 May 1891 advertised that the two shops, numbers 28 and 30 High Street West were to let. Application was to be made to James Collier, Redgate Farm, Hadfield or M. Woodcock, 34 High Street West.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 15 January 1892, Moses Cooper & Sons, tailors & drapers, advertised that they had moved from 22 High Street East to 28 High Street West. The final record found for the company was in the Trades directory of 1903.

As noted above, number 28 then became part of Arthur Bagshaw's business along with number 26.

The 1901 census includes an entry for Herbert Lord, baker, but the absence of property numbers means it is not possible to say for certain which property. As both number 28 and 30 appear, from other records, to have had other tenants perhaps he was occupying and living in one of the other buildings on the plot. As noted above, Herbert Lord probably moved on to number 14 in 1902/3.

Advertisement for Bagshaw's 1928
Advertisement for Bagshaw's 1928

30 High Street West

The position of the entry in the 1851 census indicates that the occupants were John and Mary Stafford with son John and three employees of their boot & shoe making business. John (a widower) married Mary Harrop (spinster), daughter of Thomas Harrop, beerseller, at Whitfield St James on 1 May 1849. He had been listed in directories since Bagshaw's of 1846. John Stafford was listed at High Street in the Post Office directory of 1855. It appears he then moved to Chapel Street as he was listed there in White's directory of 1857 under Beerhouses and Butchers. He said he had left Chapel Street when he advertised his move to number 38/40 in 1860 (see below).

In the Glossop Record of 20 October 1860, Edward Hague advertised that his business selling fents & smallwares was open next door to Owen Barber's, hairdresser. The 1861 census records the fent dealer as being Jane Hague with her husband Edwin and son Edward, both cotton spinners. Edward Hague's advertisement in the Glossop Record of 8 November 1862 stated that the shop was opposite the Wesley Chapel, High Street, indicating that the family had moved by then. No other records of the family have been found. However, the Glossop Record of 25 March 1865 did publish a letter from an Edward Hague who had emigrated to America, so maybe that is the answer.

No further record has been found for the property until John Smith, fishmonger, advertised in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 30 October 1869 that he had moved to more central premises, nearly opposite Bradford House (number 41). In the 1871 census he was recorded with his family and described as an out pensioner of Chelsea Hospital. John's advertisements, in which he is always described as a fishmonger, ceased at the end of April 1871 and no further record has been found.

The next record found, in Morris's directory of 1878, is for John Kershaw, clogger. The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 2 October 1880 reported on a hearing at which claims for revision of the electoral register were heard. One of the claimants for inclusion on the register was John Kershaw who gave his address as 4 Market Street. He claimed that he had moved there from 42 High Street West, which he had occupied from the preceding February having previously lived at number 30.

Kelly's directory of 1881 lists Thomas Traynor, hairdresser. He is recorded at number 30 in the 1881 census with his parents and siblings. A report of a court case in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 30 December 1882 gave the address of the family of John Traynor as 30 High Street West.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 24 September 1887 Albert Crannage, watch & clock maker & jeweller &c. of 30 High Street West, thanked customers for their patronage over the previous two years. As we have seen above, his business moved to number 6a in April 1890.

A notice in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 18 April 1890 stated “J. B. Aveson, watchmaker, jeweller, &c from 18 Primrose Lane to 30 High Street West” but he can't have been there long as an advertisement by James Collier of 135 Victoria Street, in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 11 July 1890, stated that the two shops, numbers 30 and 32 High Street West were to let.

An advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 17 October 1890 prompted readers to “Look out, for Thomas is coming, with finest tea, coffee &c, at 30 High Street West”. Thomas was Arthur W. Thomas, grocer, recorded in the 1891 census. His tenancy wasn't long either for, as we have seen, number 30 was advertised to let, together with number 28 on 29 May 1891.

The next record found was almost 8 years later, the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 10 March 1899 carrying an advertisement for B. Brown, General Draper, 30 High Street West. Brown & Co., woollen drapers, were listed in Kelly's directories of 1899 and 1900, but had moved by the time of publication of the latter.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 27 October 1899, E. W. Dobson, Art Dyer & French Cleaner, advertised the opening of new premises. The business was listed in the Trades directory of 1903, the last mention found being in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 5 June 1903.

The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 6 May 1904 advertised an exhibition of gas appliances at number 30 from May 9 to May 21, presumably making use of an empty shop.

The local trade directory in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 7 April 1905 listed G. H. Crossley, Grocers. George Crossley was also listed in Kelly's directory of 1908. In a bankruptcy hearing reported in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 28 May 1909 it was stated that George Hamer Crossley commenced business in July 1904. From August to November 1906 he occupied the shop adjoining number 30 whilst it was being rebuilt (not clear which one because both 28 and 34 were tenanted at the time) and in May 1907 opened a sweet shop and ice cream store at 60 High Street West, that being sold in August 1908.

Number 30 was advertised as to let in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 27 August 1909. In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 19 November 1909, the High Peak Conservative & Unionist Association advertised that they had moved offices to 30 High Street West. They did not stay long as the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 25 March 1910 reported that the local head offices of the Refuge Assurance Company had moved from Hadfield to 30 High Street West, Superintendent Mr. J. Johnson. The company was listed there in Kelly's directory of 1912. The company was still there on 19 March 1915 as an extract from its annual report was published in the Chronicle of that date.

The gap in available records means that nothing more has been found until Kelly' directory of 1925 when James William Haigh, costumier, was in occupation. He was also listed in the directories of 1928, 1932 and 1936.

The occupiers recorded in the 1939 register were the family of Henry Moore, Master decorator. The usage was similar when Kelly's directory of 1941 was compiled, the listing being for Hyde Wallpaper Stores (E. C. Byle, proprietor).

32 High Street West

Owen Barber, hairdresser, and his family were the occupants of the property at the time of the 1861 census. It appears that they moved from Railway Street a couple of years earlier as Owen advertised photography services at High Street in the Glossop Record of 26 November 1859. Owen died, aged 53, on 21 October 1866 and the business was taken over by his eldest son Albert who advertised in the Glossop Record of 3 November 1866 as an Umbrella & Parasol maker & Hairdresser, Norfolk Street & High Street. Owen had taken on number 6 Norfolk Street, as a second shop, a couple of years earlier (see The Early Shops and Businesses of the eastern side of Norfolk Street, Glossop). Albert maintained the two shops until June 1875 when he gave up number 32 in favour of the Norfolk Street shop.

No occupant of the property is evident in the Post Office directory of 1876 but Morris's of 1878 listed Richard McKalvey (various spellings in other records), hairdresser and tobacconist, who moved to number 70 by the time Kelly's directory of 1881 was compiled. That directory listed William Fielding, grocer, who, as we have seen, already had a shop at number 12 (now 14).

The next record found for the property is in Kelly's directory of 1888 which lists Killorn & Co., clothiers, at both 32 & 34 High Street West. No record has been found of when they entered the property. Number 32 was advertised as Workmen's Clothing & Boot Stores in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter from 7 July 1888 to 27 December 1889. Killorn & Co. had left by July 1890 when the shop was advertised to let with number 30. They had obviously ceased to use number 34 at least 18 months earlier as Matthew Woodcock moved in (see below).

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 1 August 1890, Thomas Hadfield advertised that he had opened a new branch at 32 High Street West (formerly Killorn). He intended to sell hosiery & shirts at his existing shop (number 29) and trade as a tailor, ready made clothier and hatter at 32. Thomas stayed less than 18 months as, in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 1 January 1892, he announced a sale ahead of giving up premises at 32 High Street West on 21 January. An advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 22 January 1892 announced that the house & shop at 32 High Street West, late in occupation of Thomas Hadfield, was to let. Application was to be made to 42 High Street West, the premises of Josiah Mellor, auctioneer.

During the time the shop was empty it had a couple of temporary uses for auctions. In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 5 February 1892, a company named Denham's advertised their great annual clearance sale by auction of books, albums and stationery goods, commencing Friday 5 February and continuing until all cleared out. In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 25 March 1892, John F. Ford advertised that he would sell by auction on 26 to 29 March the bankrupt stock of a grocer and provision dealer.

C. Robinson announced the opening of his new greengrocer's shop in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 18 November 1892 but nothing has been found for him after a similar advertisement in the newspaper of 23 December that year. William Jones, greengrocer, was listed in the two directories of 1895 but no other records of his stay have been found.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 27 September 1895, Albert Teasdale, grocer, thanked customers for their support during the short time he had been in business. Albert moved on just over three years later, advertising in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 28 October 1898 that he had moved to 45 High Street West (next door to Chadwick's).

In the same newspaper, T. W. Hurst & Co., Grocers, advertised that they would open the shop at 32 High Street West on Friday 4 November 1898. The listing of Hurst's business in Kelly's directory of 1899 was repeated in 1900 but they had left several months earlier.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 14 July 1899, Walter Hyde advertised his new premises at 32 High Street West (next door to the great hat centre). Walter continued to trade at both shops, as a gentleman's outfitter, hatter and tobacconist until the end of 1904 (his last advertisement found for both 32 and 34 being in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 30 December 1904) before giving up number 34. He continued in business at number 32 for many years though, being listed in all the directories up to Kelly's of 1932.

The business was taken over by Albert Hurst, listed in Kelly's directories of 1936 and 1941 and recorded at the property, with a housekeeper, in the 1939 register.

Advertisement for Walter Hyde's ca 1910
Advertisement for Walter Hyde's ca 1910

34 High Street West

John Irlam was listed as grocer, bookseller & circulating library in the Post Office directory of 1855. The family had moved to High Street from Milltown, where they were recorded in the 1851 census. John died, aged 56 on 1 November 1859. Two days later, his widow, Jane, advertised in the Glossop Record that she was continuing the business. In the Glossop Record of 21 January 1865, Jane Irlam advertised that she had removed to premises lately occupied by Mr Clarke, tailor & draper, opposite her old shop and next door to Mr. W. Smith, grocer (number 49 High Street West).

In the Glossop Record of 5 August 1865, Misses Orme & Woodcock advertised that they had opened shop lately occupied by Mrs Irlam opposite William Smith, Corn dealer. They were only there a few weeks though, advertising that they had moved to 3 High Street West in the newspaper of 2 September 1865.

James Collier was recorded as a greengrocer of High Street when he married Eliza Hill on 22 September 1868 at St. James', Whitfield. He had been in business at 26 High Street East, which was advertised as to let on 15 August 1868, and was taken over by his mother. It is likely that he moved to 34 High Street West at that time. James was recorded as a greengrocer in the 1871 census but by the end of the following year (Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 28 December 1872) had become a fishmonger. In the 1881 census James Collier, was recorded as a fishmonger at a property with no number (though he was obviously in the same shop) whilst John Dearnaley, cotton weaver, and his family were recorded at 34 (presumably the cottage referred to as 34a in the auction notice of 1898). John's son James, a clogger, would later be listed at number 60 (see below).

No further records of the property have been found until the reference in Kelly's directory of 1888 that it was part of Killorn's shop. In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 27 October 1888, James Collier advertised fireworks for sale at 34a High Street West.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 16 February 1889, Matthew Woodcock advertised that he would open his shop that day at 34, next to Killorn's. In the newspaper of 6 April 1889 he advertised the business as The Glossop Boot and Shoe Supply Company. In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 2 December 1892, Matthew advertised that he was moving to number 57. That move was completed within the following two weeks and Matthew traded at number 57 for at least 15 years. For some reason, though, he advertised his business as using number 34 again between 2 March and 20 April 1894.

Walter Hyde was listed as a hatter & tobacconist at 34 High Street West in both the 1895 directories. His advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 29 March 1895 implied that he had been there for some time as it said that people had reached the verdict that he gave splendid value after a lengthy trial. As mentioned above, it appears that Walter gave up number 34 at the end of 1904.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 11 October 1907, Dobson & Robinson advertised that they had opened a new shop at 34 High Street West. Although they are listed in Kelly's directory of 1908 at number 34 as well as their old shop at 8 High Street East, they advertised number 34 as their sole address in the newspaper of 20 December 1907. The 1911 census recorded Hannah Dobson & Kate Robinson, milliners, as joint heads of their household. They moved to number 69 and 71 High Street West before 3 January 1913.

By the time Kelly's directory of 1925 was compiled the shop had become a branch of Piper’s Penny Bazaar. It was listed under the same name in the directories of 1928 and 1932 and then became the New Economy Stores, that being the shop listed in the directories of 1936 and 1941.

Staff of the New Economy Stores ca 1935
Staff of the New Economy Stores ca 1935: Lily Almond, Edith Farmer & Alice Pearce

36 to 44 High Street West

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 12 March 1915, John T. Goddard advertised an auction to take place on 22 March. The properties concerned were specified as the Britannia Inn, 38 High Street West, plus shops at 36, 40 and 42 High Street West in the occupations of Mr E. Denton (38), G. Charlesworth (36), H. Goddard (40) and F. Ashton (42) as tenants. The numbering was erroneous to an extent as the Britannia Inn always occupied numbers 38 and 40 and other records show that Harry Goddard & Fred Ashton were at numbers 42 and 44 respectively. The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 26 March 1915 reported that the properties were sold to Robert Wilson of Ingle Nook for £2,200.

36 High Street West

The first identified occupants are in the 1861 census when the family of Abraham Patchett, butcher, were in residence (see The Patchett family in the Glossop area). The family were to run the shop for almost the rest of the century. Abraham Patchett died on 20 September 1884 and the business was taken over by his wife, Margaret. As seen above, their eldest son, George, had opened a tea and coffee business at number 6 but after a couple of years returned to number 36 to help his mother as a butcher, being listed as the occupant in the 1891 census. The last records of the business being run by the Patchetts are in the two directories of 1895.

Kelly's directory of 1899 listed George Charlesworth, butcher, but no record has been found of when he took over the business. George Charlesworth ran the business for over 30 years, the last record found for him being in Kelly's directory of 1932. George died on 24 August 1934.

Number 36 is not listed in the directories of 1936 or 1941.

Advertisement for Charlesworth's 1904
Advertisement for Charlesworth's 1904

38 & 40 High Street West, Britannia Inn

The position of his entry in the 1851 census, confirmed by the excellent History In A Pint Pot, identifies Thomas Harrop as the occupant at the time. He had been listed as early as Pigot's directory of 1835, was listed in subsequent directories and was recorded in the 1841 census. Thomas died in 1860.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 25 August 1860 and following weeks, John Stafford (see number 30 above) of High Street advertised the removal of business but did not say from and to where. However, in a series of advertisements running in parallel he said it was near to Mrs. Irlam's, bookseller (number 34), and opposite Mr Smith's grocery establishment (number 47). In a third series of advertisements starting in the Glossop Record of 6 October 1860, John said he had removed from Chapel Street to a new shop opposite Wm Smith, grocer. This indicates that it was the move to number 38/40 following the death of his wife Mary's father

John Stafford, shoemaker and beerseller, together with wife Mary, their children and two workers are recorded in the 1861 census. Mary Stafford died on 10 February 1862 and John remarried, to Sarah Jackson at Littlemoor, on 4 September the same year. John died on 26 November 1873. At the Borough Police Court on 5 January 1874, Sarah obtained a licence in place of her deceased husband. In the Post Office directory of 1876 she was described as a boot & shoe maker & beer retailer, and in Morris's directory of 1878 as an eating house keeper and beer retailer.

Kelly's directory of 1881 lists Miss Elizabeth Jackson as a beer retailer at 38 & 40 High Street West. In the census of that year she was recorded as a beerhouse keeper, with her sister living with her. No record has been found of when she replaced Sarah Stafford or of when she moved on to the Victoria Inn (number 78) but it was before her marriage in 1884.

A report in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 1 November 1884 stated that Crowther Campbell Walker was occupier of the Britannia Inn. He was listed as still there in Kelly's directory of 1888 but, as noted above, had moved to number 10 in 1887.

In Kelly's directory of 1891 and the 1891 census, George William Fisher was listed as a beer retailer. He had been preceded by his older brother, Charles Edward Fisher, who had moved from the Lamb Inn.

Lewis Wooliscroft moved from the Conservative Club, Norfolk Street, in 1891. He died on 2 September 1893 and was succeeded by his wife, Martha.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 2 February 1894, R. W. Sykes advertised the auction sale of New Houses Farm for Mr. J. R. Bradley who was giving up farming as he had taken the Britannia Inn. He was listed in the various directories up to Kelly's of 1900 but had actually left in 1899.

At the Borough police court on 6 March 1899, temporary authority was granted to Eli Denton to sell at the Britannia Inn. He was landlord until he died on 9 May 1921 and was succeeded by his wife Nancy who stayed for about two years.

The final landlord, Ralph Jones, was listed in Kelly's directory of 1925 but the pub had actually closed in 1924.

Kelly's directories of 1928 and 1932 list Hunters The Teamen Ltd., grocers, at both 38 & 40 High Street West but the directories or 1936 and 1941 list them only at number 40, the occupants of number 38 being corn dealers: Alexander Charles Godfrey in 1936 and George Redvers Lomas in 1941. The occupants in the 1939 register were recorded as Agnes C. Godfrey, pet stores (owner dealer) and her daughter Doris.

Britannia Inn with Eli & Nancy Denton at the doorway (Photo credit: Karen Fraser)
Britannia Inn with Eli & Nancy Denton at the doorway (Credit: Karen Fraser)

42 High Street West

The position of the entry in the 1861 census suggests that the family of Thomas Beard, tea dealer, occupied the property at that time. Thomas was listed in the Post Office 1855 and White 1857 directories at High Street, having been recorded in Cross Street at the time of the 1851 census. He was also listed, as a grocer and draper, in White's directory of 1862.

The occupants at the time of the 1871 census were Martha Morton, a widowed draper, her son and two daughters. Harrod's directory of 1870 had listed the shop in her husband Joseph's name even though he had died on 25 March 1869, presumably an uncorrected earlier gathering of information. No record of when the Morton's took over the property has been found, the final record found for Martha's drapery business being in the Post Office directory of 1876. She was living with her daughters in Princess Street at the time of the 1881 census.

The listing in Morris's directory of 1878 is for Dennis Sidebottom, confectioner, joiner, and builder, but no record of when he left has been found. He was also living in Princess Street, with his family, at the time of the 1881 census.

The occupants at the time of the 1881 census were the family of John Higginbottom, auctioneer. Kelly's directory of 1881 had listed Mellor & Higginbottom, auctioneers, at number 42 and at Hollin Cross Lane, which was where Josiah Mellor was recorded with his family in the census. The first advertisement found for the partnership was in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 4 September 1880.

The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 3 March 1883 published a notice of the dissolution of the Mellor & Higginbottom partnership by mutual consent. Josiah Mellor was to carry on at number 42 whilst John Higginbottom opened a business with various addresses in the forthcoming years. Josiah carried on his business at number 42 for nearly 20 years more. The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 7 February 1902 advertised that Josiah Mellor would sell the whole of his stock in trade &c on Monday next in consequence of leaving the premises.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 8 March 1884, Thomas Mahon, bill poster, bill distributor, town crier &c of 26 George St advertised that he also had an office at 42 High Street West. He was listed, as well as Josiah Mellor, in Kelly's directory of 1888 but then appears to have moved to Hadfield as, in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 22 August 1890, Josiah advertised that he would auction on 30 August all the household furniture, stock in trade &c of Thomas Mahon of 46 Bankbottom who was emigrating.

The next record found for the property was in a report in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 24 March 1905 which mentions Harry Goddard of number 42. Harry was a draper but Kelly's directory of 1908 also lists Miss Mary Goddard at the premises as a newsagent & tobacconist. Mr Goddard of High Street West is printed in the list of agents for the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter from the edition of 10 April 1903 so the family may have moved to number 42 by then.

No record of the newsagent business has been found after the mention in the 1908 directory but Harry Goddard's drapery business endured, being listed in all the directories up to Kelly of 1941. Harry died suddenly, aged 71, on 25 October 1942.

44 High Street West

There is no identifiable entry for the property in the 1861 census and the 1871 census entry says that no one was sleeping there.

The first record of an identifiable occupant is in Morris's directory of 1878 which lists Matthew Ashton, umbrella maker. The occupants recorded in the 1881 census were Matthew's family but his occupation is given as minder in a cotton mill. His father in law, John Cooper, is the one listed as an umbrella maker. John Cooper died, aged 73, in October 1881. Matthew presumably took over then as in the 1891 census his occupation was given as umbrella maker. He was also listed as such in Kelly's directories of 1888, 1891, 1899 and 1900 and the two 1895 directories.

The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 24 March 1899 published an advertisement by Fred Ashton, Matthew's son, boots & shoe dealer. It seems Matthew gave up umbrella making about that time as he was listed as a cotton spinner in the 1901 census with Fred running the boot & shoe business at number 44. Mathew died aged 56 on 12 December 1902. Fred continued to run his business, being listed in Kelly's directory as late as 1925. He subsequently moved, with his family, to Manchester, being recorded in the 1939 register at 3 Grove Terrace, Manchester.

Kelly's directories of 1928 to 1941 list the occupiers of number 44 as Jas. Smith & Sons (Cleaners) Ltd.

Advertisement for Briggs & Jowett 1901
Advertisement for Briggs & Jowett 1901

46 High Street West

Entry position indicates that the occupants in the 1861 census were the family of John Slinn, hairdresser. He was also listed in Slater's directory of 1862 (but none of the earlier directories even though he was recorded as a barber in Market Street in the 1851 census). The family subsequently moved to Bradford.

In the Glossop Record of 10 June 1865, P. Hoyle & S. Barber advertised their millinery & dressmaking establishment, next door to Mr Edwin Winterbottom's, Butcher. Unfortunately that, and subsequent, advertisements gave no indication as to whether the shop was at number 46 or number 50. A notice in the Glossop Record of 21 April 1866 announced that the partnership between P. Hoyle and Sarah Ann Barber was dissolved by mutual consent on 19 April, and that Mrs. Hoyle would carry on the business.

Sarah Ann Barber was the daughter of Owen Barber (number 32 above). She was recorded as housekeeper for her brother Edwin at 6 Norfolk Street in the 1871 census, before marrying Thomas Shepley of 2 Norfolk Street later that year. No other record of Mrs P. Hoyle has been found.

The occupants at the time of the 1871 census were the family of Joshua Firth, Fruit & potato dealer. No record has been found of when they moved there. In 1865 Joshua was advertising his address as Shepley Mill Bridge. He was listed as a grocer and draper of High Street West in the Post Office directory 1876 but may have moved on to number 150 by then.

Morris's directory of 1878 listed two people: James Cooling, confectioner and Mrs. Mary Wilde, greengrocer. A Mrs. Mary Wild, greengrocer, had been listed in the Post Office directory of 1876. She may have been the previous occupant of 26 High Street East and mother of James Collier (number 34 above). No other record of James Cooling has been found. However, he may have succeeded to Mary Wilde during 1878 as the shop remained a confectionery for many years afterwards.

Kelly's directory of 1881 listed a confectioner named George Graves. He and his family were the occupants at the time of the 1881 census.

Agnes Briggs and Harriet Ann Jowett were servants (nurse maid and cook respectively) for a family in Scholes, Cleckheaton, at the time of the 1881 census. By the time Kelly's directory of 1888 was compiled they had moved to Glossop and taken over the confectionery business at 46 High Street West. The final listing found for their business was in the Trades directory of 1903.

The confectionery business was taken over by sisters Charlotte and Martha Hadfield. They had a baby linen & ladies' underclothing business at 52 High Street West but advertised it for sale in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 1 August 1902 as they were going into other business. They were at number 46 for nearly ten years, advertising that the business was for sale by reason of illness in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 10 February 1911.

The business went to Harry Hollingworth Voysey and his wife, Mary Hannah, who were recorded at number 46 in the 1911 census with their son Eric. Harry was listed as a confectioner in Kelly's directory of 1912. The final mention found of him was in a report of a wedding, for which he made the cake, in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 22 August 1913.

The familiar gap in records means that nothing more was able to be found until Kelly's directories of 1925 to 1941. By that time number 46, together with numbers 48 and 50 had been acquired by the Co-op, demolished and rebuilt. Numbers 46 and 48 were the Co-op tea rooms or cafe.

Advertisement for Glossop Cycle Co. 1904
Advertisement for Glossop Cycle Co. 1904

48 High Street West

Once again we need to rely on the position of the entry on the enumerator's sheet which indicates that Edwin Winterbottom, butcher, and his family were the occupants in 1861. He had been listed at High Street in the Post Office directory of 1855 and White's of 1857. He was also listed in the Post Office directory of 1849 at Howard Town but that was possibly a different property as the 1851 census recorded the family at Top of Town. In the Glossop Record between 10 February and 29 May 1866, Edwin advertised to let a shop almost suitable for any trade. As seen above the family then appears to have moved to number 8.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 30 July 1870, E. Brain, dealer in smallwares &c advertised that she had taken the premises next door to the Chronicle Office. That those premises were number 48 is confirmed by the 1871 census which records her as a widowed draper with her two sons. She was listed at High Street West in the Post Office directory of 1876 and, as we have seen above, had moved to number 28 by the time Morris's directory of 1878 was compiled.

Kelly's directory of 1881 lists John Hardman, who practiced dentistry at his home at 47 Norfolk Street, as a chemist at 48 High Street West but no record has been found of when he actually moved into the shop. By 23 January 1883 he was also advertising as a dentist at number 48 and by 27 September 1884 advertising the chemist's shop as Ye Golden Motar. John appears to have given up the chemist's business in 1890.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 2 January 1891, Alfred Percival Golden, Chemist, advertised as the successor to Mr Hardman, 48 High Street West. He was to stay until nearly the end of the decade. In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 24 February 1899, T. J. Wright of 20 Fitzalan Street advertised that the shop occupied by Mr. Golden, chemist, 48 High Street West, was to let.

An advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 23 March 1900 gave addresses for the Glossop & Hadfield Cycle Stores as 47 High Street West and Station Road, Hadfield. Number 47 continued to be printed in subsequent advertisements but was corrected to 48 in the newspaper of 24 August 1900. The final advertisement found for the company at number 48 was in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 7 April 1905. In advertisements published between 1 February and 19 April 1907, an address of 74 High Street was given. Presumably that referred to High Street East as Mary Eyre was the tenant of 74 High Street West at the time (see below). As noted above, the company had moved to number 12 by 26 April 1907. Having said that, entries for the company in the local trades directory in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter up to 26 December 1913 (last available) give the address of the Glossop Cycle & Motor Co. as number 48 even though main advertisements say number 12. It seems strange that an error would be allowed to persist so long so presumably the company used outbuildings.

The shop then had a variety of uses. Kelly's directory of 1908 lists James Aveson & Co. furniture dealers. At the time of the 1911 census the premises were listed as Shop (office) with no occupant recorded. Kelly's directory of 1912 lists the Wesleyan & General Assurance Society; district office (Alfred Elliott, superintendent).

As noted above, the rebuilt number 48 then became part of the Co-op tea rooms or cafe.

Advertisement for the Co-op Cafe 1928
Advertisement for the Co-op Cafe 1928

50 High Street West

The entry for John Garlick, tinplate worker, in the 1861 census suggests that he occupied number 50. His advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 13 October 1860 described his business as ironmonger, iron & tinplate worker, late E. Edleston. Elijah Edleston was listed as a tinman and brazier at High Street in the Post Office directory of 1855 and White's of 1857. John Garlick was listed in White's directory of 1862 but no record has been found of when he left the premises.

As mentioned above, P. Hoyle & S. Barber advertised their shop next to Mr Edwin Winterbottom's in the Glossop Record but gave no indication as to whether the shop was at number 46 or number 50.

Daniel Woodhead must have moved his business from number 65 to number 50 before 30 July 1870 as that is the date that Eliza Brain advertised, in Daniel's Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter, that she had opened her shop next door to the Chronicle Office. Daniel Woodhead died on 16 January 1872. His stationery, printing & bookbinding business was carried on by his wife, Ann, but continued to be listed under Daniel's name in directories. The business was moved to 57 High Street West within a few months after the 1881 census (which took place on 3 April).

An advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 23 July 1881 stated that The Glossop Boot Hall would open on Saturday next July 30 at 50 High Street West. How long it remained open has not been discovered. The last advertisement found for the business was in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 29 October 1881.

The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 15 September 1883 carried an advertisement for T. Miller & Co., the People's Tradesmen, Glossop & Tintwistle. No record has been found for when Thomas Miller moved into number 50 but he was there when Stephen Woodhead moved his music business to number 52 (Next to Mr. Miller, grocer) in February 1884. Thomas's business survived a major fire which occurred on 25 April 1885. He was able to advertise, in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 13 June 1885, that he had reopened after repairing the premises.

In advertising his intention to apply for a wines & spirits off licence, in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 7 August 1891, Thomas Miller stated that T. J. Wright of 72 High Street West was the owner of the premises. The business was listed in the various directories up to the Trades directory of 1903. The Miller family moved to New Mills, Thomas being mentioned in a report in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 13 January 1905, and had returned to Ashton under Lyne (where both Thomas and his wife came from) by the time of the 1911 census.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 20 March 1903, number 50 was advertised to let by T. J. Wright, 10 Oak Avenue, Romiley (he had given up his business at number 72 some years earlier see below). The shop took some time to let as the advertisements ran until at least 1 April 1904.

Kelly's directory of 1908 lists Mrs. George Hyde, milliner & fancy draper, at 50 High Street West. Agnes Gertrude Hyde and her husband George had been in business at number 12 (see above) which they left in February 1905 but the date when they actually moved in has not been found. It may have been that George was forced into retirement by ill health. When he died, aged 49 on 11 December 1909, his obituary stated that he had suffered a lingering illness. Agnes was recorded living at number 50 with her sister in the 1911 census. Shortly afterwards she married Walter Oliver of number 85 High Street West (also widowed), at Howard Town Wesleyan Chapel. Walter and his wife had lived next door to Agnes and George in North Road at the time of the 1901 census.

As mentioned above, numbers 46 to 50 were demolished and rebuilt at some time in the gap for which records are unavailable. Rather than becoming part of the Co-op cafe, though, number 50 remained a milliners. Kelly's directory of 1925 lists Wrigley & Nield there whilst the directories of 1928 and 1932 list Mrs. E. Pogson. The property is not mentioned in the 1936 and 1941 directories or in the 1939 register.

52 and 50 High Street West ca 1905
52 and 50 High Street West ca 1905

52 to 62 High Street West

An advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 25 January 1873 stated that the six properties 52, 54, 56, 58, 60 & 62 High Street West, occupied by Mr George Robinson and others, were to be auctioned by Messrs. France and Baggaley on 10 February 1873. No report of the outcome has been found.

An advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 6 January 1893 stated that the properties 52 to 62 High Street West, tenanted by Messrs Robinson & Co., Fred Pickford, Samuel Watkinson and others were to be auctioned by John F. Ford on 16 January 1893. The lease was created in 1833. The report of the auction stated that they were bought by Ellis Dewsnap for £1,750, on behalf of Messrs Robinson & Co., one of the tenants.

52 High Street West

The apparent occupant at the time of the 1861 census was Sarah Jackson who ran an eating house. Ten years later the form has two entries, for two households, at number 52. The first was for Annie Hart, cotton winder, and her baby daughter and the second the family of Joseph Hague, police constable.

At the time of the 1881 census the family of Ellis Dewsnap, house painter, were in residence. Ellis's wife, Hannah, was a daughter of George Robinson (see below). They would later live at number 62 (see below). Ellis was the buyer at the 1893 auction.

An advertisement by John Higginbottom, auctioneer, in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 6 October 1883 gave his address as number 52. He had been mainly working out of 4a Market Street since the dissolution of his partnership with Josiah Mellor (up to the beginning of June at least) and advertised with an address of Glossop House (Shepley Mill Bridge) by January 1884.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 16 February 1884, Stephen Woodhead advertised the move of his music business to number 52 High Street West (as mentioned above). The final advertisement found for his business was in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 27 March 1886.

Kelly's directory of 1888 listed Joseph Walton as a draper at number 52, whilst the directory of 1891 listed both Joseph and his wife Eliza. She was, of course, the former Eliza Brain who had traded at number 48 and then number 28 (see above). The 1861 census makes it clear that it was Eliza who ran the drapery, Joseph Walton being recorded as a cotton cloth looker. Eliza was listed in both 1895 directories but it appears that the Waltons gave up the shop the following year. In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter 13 November of 1896, John T. Goddard advertised that he would auction the whole of the stock of drapery goods, library of books and sundry furniture at number 52 between 20 and 28 November. Joseph died aged 82 in March 1897. Eliza was living with her sister in Gladstone Street at the time of the 1901 census.

The next occupant, Humphrey Crossley, took over the shop in 1897 though no record of the exact date has been found. Kelly's directories of 1899 and 1900 described him as a draper but in newspaper reports he was described as a hatter and tobacconist. The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 12 January 1900 reported that Humphrey Crossley had been declared bankrupt on his own petition. In the same newspaper Josiah Mellor advertised that, under a bill of sale, he would auction the shop fittings &c at 52 High Street West on the following Tuesday.

An advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 7 September 1900 announced that C. A. & M. J. Hadfield would open the shop at 52 High Street West, that day. In the 1901 census, Charlotte and Martha Hadfield were recorded as fancy drapers at number 52. In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 1 August 1902 they advertised that their baby linen & ladies' underclothing business was for sale as they were going into other business. This was when they moved to number 46 as noted above.

The Trades directory of 1903 listed a Henry Crossley, hatter & tailor, at 52 High Street West. This was possibly Humphrey's father but no other record of him being in business has been found.

The next occupant of the shop was William Pell who opened his boot making business in 1903, though the exact date has not been identified. The first mention found in a newspaper was in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 13 October 1905 when he advertised that he wanted an apprentice to bootmaking and repairing. William retired in 1925 and the business was taken over by his son, also William. He stayed at number 52 until 1936 when he moved across the road to number 61.

There is no listing for number 52 in Kelly's directory of 1941.

Advertisement for the Misses Hadfield 1901
Advertisement for the Misses Hadfield 1901

54 High Street West

The property appears to have been used solely as a dwelling at first, being occupied at the time of the 1861 census by the family of Allen Cox and ten years later by the family of Samuel Beard. Both men were cotton weavers.

At the time of the 1881 census the head of the household was Robert Rolly, chapel keeper (chapel not identified). He was recorded as a widower but his wife was actually away, recorded as a visitor at the home of Arthur & Agnes Johnson in Potter Newton, Leeds. Their daughter Alice was running a millinery business. By the time Kelly's directory of 1888 was compiled the family had moved to 8 High Street East. That directory listed John Green, a confectioner, at 54 High Street West but no other record of him has been found.

The next identified tenants stayed far longer. Kelly's directory of 1891 listed Samuel Watkinson, confectioner, but in the 1891 census he was recorded as a cotton sizer, his wife, Fanny, really being the confectioner. The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 1 February 1895 reported that Mary Ellen Watkinson, confectioner, had been given temporary authority to sell sweet wines at her shop in High Street West. Mary Ellen was Samuel's younger sister. It appears that she had just taken over as the Post Office directory of 1895 listed her but Bulmer's listed Samuel. Samuel and Fanny had moved to Blackpool. Mary Ellen was listed in Kelly's directories of 1899 and 1900 and in the Trades directory of 1903. The 1901 census recorded Mary's older sister, Elizabeth, as head of the household with both being recorded as bakers & confectioners.

When the next change of tenancy took place has not been discovered but Kelly's directory of 1908 listed Misses Jessie & Annie Beard as confectioners. At the time of the 1911 census Anne Jane Beard and sister Jessy Rowbottom Beard were recorded as confectioners whilst their sister, Elizabeth Alice Beard, was a cotton weaver. Jessie and Annie were listed in Kelly's directory of 1912 but the gap in available records means that when they gave up the shop is not known.

The shop remained a confectioner's, the owner listed in Kelly's directory of 1925 being Mrs Jessie Kennerley. In the 1928 and 1932 directories the owner was George Bowden. By the time the 1936 directory was compiled, number 54 had become John Kennington's wallpaper dealership and was listed similarly in the 1941 directory.

56 High Street West

The property appears to have had residential use in 1861, the position of the census entry suggesting that the occupants were the family of George Adlington, carter. At the time of the 1871 census, Mark Garner, a tailor, with his wife and mother in law, were the residents. Mark Garner was mentioned in reports in the Glossop Record in January 1862 when he was landlord of the Talbot Arms, Bernard Street. He died in 1880 but the records do not give his address,

John Hadfield, grocer, of 56 High Street West & Station road, Hadfield, advertised in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 27 December 1879. He was listed in Kelly's directory of 1881. The shop was unoccupied at the time of the 1881 census but a John Hadfield, retired grocer, was recorded at 24 Gladstone Street with his wife and adopted daughter. He advertised a large house and shop fitted up for a grocer and draper to let in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter in November 1884.

Nothing further was found for the property until the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 29 August 1885 when F. Pickford & Son announced that they would open the shop on Friday 4 September with a choice selection of fruit and vegetables. Frederick Pickford passed on the business to his son Lot after the 1891 census but before the compilation of the Post Office directory of 1895. Lot moved the business to 6 High Street East, apparently in 1899 as Kelly's directory lists both him and Miss Ann Redfern at number 56 in that year.

Ann Redfern, glass & china dealer, only stayed at number 56 for a couple of years after moving from number 58. Ann wasn't alone in the property at the time of the 1901 census. The head of the household was her father Ner Redfern, widowed and living on his own means. Also there were Ann's sister Selina and niece Gertrude. Ner died in November 1901. Ann, Selina and Gertrude moved to number 73 High Street West before 19 December 1902 when number 56 was advertised for sale as a greengrocery business.

Apart from a similar for sale advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 9 January 1903, the next record found for number 56 was in Kelly's directory of 1908 when Charles Greaves was listed as a greengrocer. He was also listed in Kelly's directory of 1912 but no further record of him has been found.

Kelly's directories of 1925 to 1941 list Thomas Overend, confectioner, at number 56. Thomas and his wife, Beatrice, were recorded at the property in the 1939 register.

58 High Street West

The residents at the times of both the 1861 and 1871 censuses were the family of William Smith, cotton warp dresser. No record has been found of when they moved out.

Morris's directory of 1878 listed Jacob Kay, boot and shoemaker, at number 58. As noted above, after letting the Junction Inn to Tom Dutton in March 1875, he opened a boot & shoe dealership at number 14 with his son in law John Swire. Presumably Jacob and his family moved into number 58 when number 14 was put up for sale in 1877. The occupants at the time of the 1881 census were Ellen Kaye, boot & shoe dealer's wife, and their daughter Frances Louisa. Jacob was recorded in 1881 as landlord of the Sickleholme Inn, Bamford. When the Kay family left the shop has not been discovered but Jacob took over the Junction Inn again in 1884.

Kelly's directory of 1881 listed Henry Salisbury & Son, jewellers, at number 58. No other records of them has been found.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 3 September 1887, H. Lawton & Co. advertised that they intended opening the shop at 58 High Street West, opposite the Coffee Palace, on Friday 9 September for the sale of smallwares. They had named the shop Dinting House.

That venture did not last long as, in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 7 July 1888, Miss Vickers advertised that she had severed her connections with a firm of the same name at Ashton and in the premises at 87 High Street West and had opened the two shops 58 & 60 High Street West for the sale of household furniture. Mary Sophia Vickers was listed at both shops in Kelly's directory of 1891 and recorded at both properties with two nieces and a nephew in the 1891 census. No further records have been found for Mary Vickers.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 17 March 1893, A. & S. Redfern of 58 High Street West, which they called Staffordshire House, advertised that they were now offering the best value in glass, china & earthenware. An advertisement in the newspaper of 3 August 1894 advised that the partnership between Ann Redfern and Selena Redfern had been dissolved by mutual consent on 1 August 1894. The business at Staffordshire House was to be carried on by Ann Redfern alone. As we have seen above, Ann stayed at number 58 until moving next door in 1899.

At the time of the 1901 census the occupants were William Bruckshaw, greengrocer, and his wife Annie. No records have been found of when they entered or left the property.

The next records available for number 58 are in Kelly's directories of 1908 and 1912 when the River Plate Fresh Meat Co. Ltd., butchers, were the occupants.

At some time in the gap where records are not available the shop became a confectioner's. Henry Stead is listed in Kelly's directories of 1925 and 1928, Mrs. Beatrice Wilson in the 1932 directory and Harry Overend in that of 1936.

In Kelly's directory of 1941, Mrs. Gertrude Torkington was listed as a florist at the shop.

60 High Street West

The entry in the 1871 census states that the family of George Robinson, master painter & paper hanger, occupied both number 60 and number 62 High Street West. The entry in the 1861 census appears to show the same. The family were living in Milltown in 1851. George was listed as a painter in High Street in White's directory of 1857, so the family had moved by then. His listing in the Post Office directory of 1855 has no address so the family could well have still been in Milltown at the time. In the Post Office directory of 1876, George was listed as a furniture dealer & paperhanger in High Street West but whether the family still occupied both properties isn't clear.

The Robinsons had given up number 60 two years later as Morris's directory of 1878 lists John Thomas Leech, milliner, there. Kelly's directory of 1881 and the 1881 census clarify that John was actually a cabinet maker and the milliner was his wife, Annie Matilda. By the time Kelly's directory of 1888 was compiled they had moved to number 57 High Street West.

That Kelly's directory listed James Dearnaley, clogger, at number 60. He was one of the family recorded at number 34 in the 1881 census. At the time of the 1891 census he and his family were at 317 High Street West. No records of when he moved to and from number 60 have been found.

The Post Office directory of 1895 lists Thomas Parker, news agent. Bulmer's directory gave his name as Barber but mentions in newspapers show that was an error. Thomas's name was in the list of agents published in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter between 1 February 1895 and 24 December 1896.

As mentioned above (number 12), John Thomas Whitham was listed as a news agent at number 60 in Kelly's directories of 1899 and 1900. He was recorded at number 60, with his family, in the 1901 census. By October 1901, John Whitham was advertising his new premises at 87 High Street West. That calls into question whether his listing as a photographer at number 60 in the Trades directory of 1903 was accurate.

The Trades directory also listed the Misses Thornhill, dressmakers & milliners, at number 60. An advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 15 November 1901 said that their house and shop in High Street East was to let with possession at the end of December. That, presumably, is when they moved to number 60. The business was advertised as for disposal in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 11 September 1903 as the owners were leaving Glossop.

The next directory entry for the shop was in Kelly's of 1908 which listed Henry Crossley, confectioner. As mentioned above (number 30) he opened the shop in May 1907 and left in August 1908.

The occupants in the 1911 census were the family of Thomas and Elizabeth Overend, she being a confectioner. Kelly's directory of 1912 listed the business in Thomas's name. They were the parents of the Thomas Overend later running a confectionery business at number 56.

Towards the end of the decade numbers 60 and 62 were demolished in order to allow building of the Empire Cinema, which opened on 25 April 1921 (see Glossop's Theatres and Cinemas). When the cinema was listed in Kelly's directories of 1925 to 1941, the listings named the manager in 1925 (Irvine Dearnaley) and 1932 to 1941 (S. A. Jones). Sydney A. Jones and his wife, Anne, were recorded as resident at the Empire Theatre in the 1939 register.

62 High Street West

As mentioned above, George Robinson, Master painter & paper hanger, was apparently using both numbers 60 and 62 for some years but by 1878 had given up number 60. George continued to run the firm until he died in July 1887. An advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 30 July 1887 announced that the painting & paper hanging business (Established 1845) of the late George Robinson of 62 High Street West would be continued by his sons under the name George Robinson and Sons.

The family of Joseph Platt Robinson, second son of George and his wife Matilda, were the occupants of number 62 recorded in the 1891 census (Matilda was away visiting in Accrington at the time and died in August that year). By the time of the auction of 20 January 1893, the firm had become Robinson & Co. and was listed as such in the directories of 1895 to 1912. Joseph Platt Robinson was named in the listing in Bulmer's directory of 1895 but then moved his family away from Glossop, being recorded at Blackpool in the 1901 census and Gorton in 1911. The occupants of number 62 in 1901 and 1911 were the family of Ellis and Hannah Dewsnap.

As mentioned above, the property was demolished to make way for the Empire Cinema.

68 to 60 High Street West ca 1930s
68 to 60 High Street West ca 1930s

64 and 66 High Street West

The occupant of number 64 recorded in the 1861 census was Sarah Jackson, Shopkeeper. She was listed in White's directory of 1862 and Harrod's of 1870. The former was probably for number 64 whilst the latter was more likely to be number 83 High Street West, where she was recorded in the 1871 census.

In 1861 the occupant of number 66 was John Booth, a furniture dealer. He had been listed in White's directory of 1857 and was also listed in White's of 1862.

By the time of the 1871 census both 64 and 66 were occupied by William Symes Wright, tinplate worker. He had a shop in Norfolk Square between 1861 and 1863 and then apparently moved to Arundel Street. He possible moved from the latter after it was sold in 1866, as he was listed at High Street in Harrod's directory of 1870. No record has been found of when he moved but he was listed as an ironmonger & tin plate worker in Station Road, Hadfield in the Post Office directory of 1876.

The same directory listed Duncan John Mackenzie, surgeon, at High Street West with Morris's of 1878 confirming the address as 64 and 66 High Street West. Dr. Mackenzie was there for about 20 years, the final records of him at 64 and 66 being in the two 1895 directories.

By the time Kelly's directory of 1899 was compiled, Misses Caroline (Clarie) & Alice Bamford had moved their confectionery business from Victoria Street. They were recorded using both premises in the 1901 census but had moved on by mid August 1902.

During their tenure number 66 (which may have covered number 64 given the joint usage), together with numbers 68 to 76 and the Victoria Inn were auctioned on 17 December 1900. The Victoria Inn was sold to its tenant, Thomas Harrison, for £2,190; numbers 76 & 74 High Street West were sold to Mrs Shepley of Norfolk St for £620 and numbers 66 to 72 were sold to Alderman Stafford of Hyde for £820.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 22 August 1902, John Bromhall advertised his saddlery business at 64 & 66 High Street West. He had only just moved as he had advertised as being at number 75 up until the previous week. He was in business there until he died on 9 January 1912. John's wife, Jane, was listed in Kelly's directory of 1912. Kelly's directories of 1908 and 1912 only listed the business at number 66 but both the 1901 census and the probate calendar recorded both 64 and 66.

The Kelly directories of 1925 to 1941 and the 1939 register also only use number 66 for the butchers business in the shops. In 1925 and 1928 the listing was for John Reginald Cooper; in 1932 and 1936, Cooper Bros. and in 1941, Clifford Cooper. The residents recorded in the 1939 register were Clifford Cooper and wife Florence.

68 High Street West

The occupant in the 1861 census was Robert Braddock, letter carrier & confectioner. He was recorded at Green Vale ten years earlier but moved to number 68 not long after starting as letter carrier on 14 February 1852, being listed at High Street in directories from the Post Office one of 1855. Robert died suddenly, aged 72, on 9 December 1885 whilst still delivering letters, having refused his entitlement to retirement for 15 years. In all his time in the job he apparently only ever took 4 days off, and that after nearly drowning from tripping and falling in a lodge at Meadow Mills in 1876.

When Robert Braddock had advertised his intention for a licence to sell Sweets (British Wines) on 22 July 1873, the property owner was David Shepley of Charlesworth, shoemaker (see A Shepley family of Charlesworth).

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 7 May 1887, the Liverpool Victoria Legal Friendly Society advertised for canvassers and collectors, application to be made to J. A. Vickers, District Agent, at number 68. The last advertisement found for the Society at number 68 was 27 April 1889 when T. Bedforth was agent.

Walter Kenyon, clogger, was listed in the two 1895 directories. No record has been found of when he moved in but it was after the 1891 census as the family was living in Salisbury Street, Hadfield at that time. The family was at number 68 at the time of the 1901 census and then moved to Surrey Street, Walter dying there, aged only 43, on 22 June 1904.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 12 September 1902, Wright Bridge advertised that he had opened the shop at 68 High Street West as a Tripe Business. No other record of his business has been found.

Kelly' directory of 1908 listed Mrs. Hannah Mellor who had a confectionery business at number 68. She was recorded in the 1911 census as a widowed shopkeeper, sweets & general, with her son and brother living with her, Hannah was listed in Kelly's directory of 1912 but no record of when she left has been found. It was before 9 July 1915 though as the shop was advertised to let in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of that date.

Kelly's directories of 1925 and 1928 listed William Torkington, fishmonger, at the property. By the time of the 1932 directory his son had joined him, the business being listed as W. Torkington & Son that year, in 1936 and in 1941.

70 High Street West

John McCurdy, widowed master cordwainer, was recorded at number 70 in the 1861 census with his son and apprentice. He had advertised his shop as opposite the Wesleyan Chapel, High Street, in the Glossop Record of 5 November 1859. John was listed in White's directory of 1862 but no later record has been found of him.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 29 May 1869, Thomas Hadfield advertised his clothing business as next door to Wright tobacconist and opposite the Wesleyan Chapel. He was there for almost seven years, advertising in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 12 February 1876 that he was moving from 70 High Street West to 29 High Street West lately occupied by J. Kelly, Tailor.

Morris's directory of 1878 listed Isaac Jackson, saddler and harness maker. Number 70 was his first shop in Glossop. He had moved on to 75 High Street West by the time Kelly's directory of 1881 was compiled.

As we have seen above (number 32) that directory listed Richard McKelvey, hair dresser. He married in Ashton under Lyne the following year and had moved, with his wife Hannah and son Fred, to Heaton Norris by the time of the 1891 census. The family was still in Glossop in 1884 as Richard and Hannah had two sons born in Glossop in 1883/4 who died in infancy.

The hairdressing business was taken over by Fred Dunkerley, the first record for whom was found in Kelly's directory of 1888. Fred was listed in the Trades directory of 1903. He died on 10 December 1905 aged only 43.

Presumably that is when the business next changed hands. Kelly's directory of 1908 listed James Henry Senior at number 70. James was the son of Richard McElvey's sister, Ann, so perhaps Richard had retained an interest in the shop.

An advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 22 October 1915 announced that the partnership between James Henry Senior and Joseph Byrom, carrying on business at 70 High Street West under the style of J. H. Senior, hairdresser & tobacconist, and at 53 High Street East under the style of J. Byrom, herbalist, had been dissolved from 25 September 1915. The business at 53 High Street East would be carried on by Joseph Byrom and that at 70 High Street West by James Henry Senior.

James was listed in all the Kelly directories from 1925 to 1941 and was recorded at number 70 with his family in the 1939 register. He died there on 2 March 1961, aged 74, the business being carried on by his daughter Winefride who had worked with him for many years.

72 High Street West

The first identified occupant was at number 72 for about forty years. The first record found of Thomas James Wright, tobacconist and grocer, was in White's directory of 1857. He initially lived I the property with his family but had moved his residence to 20 Fitzalan Street by the time of the 1881 census, leaving the shop as a lock up. Thomas was listed in both of the 1895 directories but had given up the shop by the end of the decade and retired to Romiley where he died, aged 76, on 4 November 1904.

Kelly's directories of 1899 and 1900 list an Alfred Anderson, tobacconist, at 72 High Street West. No record has been found of when he entered or left the shop.

In the 1901 census the family of George Shaw, cotton weaver, was recorded there with no indication that any of them was in business. It is possible that they were though, as the Trades directory of 1903 listed Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Shaw as Tobacconists at number 72.

Kelly's directory of 1908 listed Frank Hope & Co., corn & flour merchants, at number 72. He had previously had the Borough Corn Mill but gave his address as High Street West in an advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 7 December 1906. The last record found for him mentioning number 72 was in Kelly's directory of 1912.

Kelly's directories of 1925 and 1928 listed Mrs. Rachel Hill, shop keeper, at number 72. It then became a fried fish dealers, William Haigh being listed in the 1931 directory and Walter Hurst in 1936 and 1941. The 1939 register listed Walter B. Bowring Hurst as a lorry driver with his wife, Edith D. Bowring Hurst, as a fish frier alongside running the household.
Walter Basil Bowring Hirst (the correct spelling) was born to David and Isabel Bowring on 30 September 1895 in Lamesley, Co. Durham. He was adopted by Abraham Hirst sometime between the 1901 & 1911 census period. His son and 2 granddaughters had Bowring as part of their full names, but this was not carried on to the next generation (Thanks to Lynda Meehan for this information).

74 High Street West

Resident at the time of the 1861 census was the family of Greenwood Cockcroft, clogger. They moved on shortly afterwards, probably to Victoria Street where they were living in 1871 and where Greenwood died, aged 46, on 2 September 1882.

Listed in White's directory of 1862 was Moses Roberts, a boot and shoe maker. He was recorded there with his family in the 1871 census and stayed until after the middle of the decade, being listed in the Post Office directory of 1876. It appears the family then moved to Leominster where they are found in 1881.

The next occupants, listed in Morris's directory of 1878 and recorded in the 1881 census were Thomas and Hannah Twells (Twalls in some records) who has moved from High Street East. They ran a smallware drapery business in addition to selling boots and shoes. The last record found for them is in a report in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 14 July 1883. They also appear to have left the district after vacating the shop.

John Kenworthy, who sold the same products, was listed in Kelly's directory of 1888 but no record has been found of when he moved in. There is a record of when he left though. In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 2 March 1889, Josiah Mellor advertised that he would auction all the stock in trade on 8 March as John Kenworthy was giving up the business.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 16 March 1889, Miss Sophia Mellor advertised that she would open the shop at 74 High Street West (lately occupied by Mr. John Kenworthy) as a milliner on Friday next, 22 March. Sophia was the daughter of the auctioneer Josiah (see number 42 above). The full family was recorded at number 74 in the 1891 census but the entries in the two 1895 directories were in Josiah's name. It appears that the family used number 74 as well as number 42 during this period.

No record has been found of exactly when the Mellors vacated number 74 but Kelly's directory of 1899 listed Miss Mary E. Eyre, draper. Mary stayed almost ten years, being listed in Kelly's directory of 1908.

A report in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 12 February 1909 mentioned Mr. & Mrs. Walter Robinson's music warehouse in High Street West. In the 1911 census, Walter was recorded as a copper roller engraver for a calico printer whilst Mary Hannah was recorded as running the music warehouse. Walter was listed in Kelly's directory of 1912 but the Robinsons had moved to 75 High Street East by January 1915.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 14 May 1915, Miss E. Gilbert, Millinery & Fancy Goods, advertised that she had taken the premises at 74 High Street West. How long she stayed is unknown because of the familiar unavailability of records.

By the time Kelly's directory of 1925 was compiled, James Lester, greengrocer, had taken the shop. James died, aged 86, on 11 November 1852, the business being then run by his son Jack.

Advertisement for Sarah Doodson 1901
Advertisement for Sarah Doodson 1901

76 High Street West

There was no entry for the property in the 1861 census so the first record found was in the Glossop Record of 29 November 1862 when Edward Yeadon advertising the opening of a new tea warehouse in High Street, opposite the Wesley Chapel. He was there just over two years. In the Glossop Record of 23 January 1864, Edward Wogan advertised the sale, on 27 January, of the whole stock in trade, shop fixtures and household requisites of Edward Yeadon, opposite Wesley Chapel.

In the Glossop Record of 22 July 1865, John Beard advertised that he had opened a new hosiery & smallware establishment in the shop next door to Mr. Roberts' boot & shoe shop, opposite the Wesleyan Chapel. John Beard moved to 3 High Street West after marrying Martha Orme in November 1868 at Littlemoor chapel.

The next occupant was George Doodson, draper. William Eversden advertised in the Glossop Record of 3 April 1869 that the shop now occupied by George Doodson in Norfolk Square was to let. By 17 April the wording had changed to “lately occupied by”, indicating that George had moved to number 76. George was listed in Harrod's directory of 1870 and recorded, with his family, at number 76 in the 1871 census.

In August 1873, George Doodson went into partnership with John Turner of Charlesworth as auctioneers (George from his shop at number 76 and John from his premises in Charlesworth). It was apparently not all that successful a partnership as the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 10 January 1874 carried an advertisement announcing that John Turner was to conduct the auction business alone.

George continued to run the drapery business until he died, aged 76, on 20 March 1898. The business was then taken over by his daughters, Sarah and Harriet. They were listed in Kelly's directories of 1899 and 1900 but when Harriet died in the first quarter of 1901, Sarah carried on alone. In the 1901 census, Sarah is recorded with her niece, 13 year old Mary Doodson daughter of her brother Willie. The last record found of Sarah is in Kelly's directory of 1912, the gap in available records meaning the date she gave up the shop not being found.

When Kelly's directory of 1925 was compiled, number 76 had become a fishmongers, Thomas Foy, who also had premises in Derby Street, being listed. Thomas died in 1926 and the 1928 directory listed his widow, Mrs. Ann Jane Foy, as running the business. There are no entries for number 76 in the 1932, 1936 and 1941 directories. The 1939 register entry indicates that it was part of the Victoria Inn.

The Victoria Inn ca 1938
The Victoria Inn ca 1938

78 High Street West, Victoria Inn

In the 1861 and 1871 censuses the Victoria was recorded as Arundel Street but the Post Office directory of 1855 and Harrod's of 1870 both list the first landlady, Sarah Ann Woffenden, in High street. Sarah died at the beginning of December 1873. At the Borough Police Court on 5 January 1874 Thomas Bridge, Sarah's son-in-law, was given a new licence for the Victoria Inn. He was licensee for just over 9 years. The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 10 February 1883 reported that the licence of the Victoria Inn was transferred from Thomas Bridge to William Kinder. His tenure was short lived as the licence was transferred, on 24 November 1884, from Elizabeth Jackson (see 38/40 above) to James Goddard (who she had married on 10 October 1884).

When the Goddards left has not been found but the residents in the 1891 census were John Cooper, Innkeeper with wife Hannah and a servant. The inn was recorded as 2 Arundel Street. In the two 1895 directories the inn was listed as 78 High Street West. R. W. Sykes advertised, in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 27 September 1895 that, on instruction of Mr. John Cooper of the Victoria Inn, he would sell the whole of the household furniture on Monday 30 September.

Tom Harrison was the next licensee. The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 25 October 1895 reported that he had been granted temporary permission to sell at the Victoria Inn. As noted above, when the Victoria Inn was auctioned on 17 December 1900 it was Tom Harrison who bought it, for £2,190. In the 1901 census there was no entry for the Victoria Inn, Thomas Harrison being described as a beer seller at 10 Arundel Street.

The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 23 November 1906 reported that, on 17 November, the Victoria Inn licence had been transferred to Harry Ogden. He was not there long as Kelly's directory of 1908 listed John E. Ainsworth as a beer retailer at 78 High Street West. He didn't stay long either.

The 1911 census records the family of Joseph Crompton, Publican. On the accompanying property schedule the pub is listed as 78 High Street West but Joe put an address of Arundel Street on his form. Joseph Crompton was listed as a beer retailer, 78 High Street West, in each of Kelly's directories up to 1932.

Kelly's directory of 1936 listed William John Gorick as a beer retailer at 78 High Street West. In the 1939 register he was recorded with his family as a proprietor licensed premises at both 76 and 78 High Street West.

Kelly's directory of 1941 listed Victoria Inn (G. Riding). As always with Glossop pubs, reference to the book History In A Pint Pot provides more details.

Unidentified

The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 14 June 1907 carried an advertisement from W. Aspin of 17 Charlestown stating that the butchering business carried on at 2 High Street West was for sale. Kelly's directory of 1908 listed John Henry Wilson as a butcher at 2 High Street West. No mention has been found of that address other than the early references to the properties which used to form part of the buildings between Norfolk Square and Railway Street before the Co-op buildings were erected. In the 1901 census Walter Aspin was a cotton yarn maker up at 80 Charlestown and in the 1911 census he was a dyed yarn maker up foreman at 17 Charlestown.



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Last updated: 20 April 2022