An Early History of numbers 1 to 25 High Street East, Glossop.

This article aims to document the first hundred years or so of development of the shops and businesses of the western end of High Street East (up to number 25), using available records in censuses, directories and newspapers. Any additional information will be gratefully received.
I must acknowledge the help of Mike Brown for allowing me to use photos from his collection and to Mike and Lynda Meehan for providing information which they have gleaned over the years.

1906
Looking up High Street East from a postcard posted in 1906.

In early directories and census records, the town centre end of High Street East was often documented as Howard Town, High Street and even Market Street in the 1851 census. It is only by comparing records from various sources that one can work out which businesses were where.

1 High Street East

The property was probably built at the same time as numbers 2 to 4 Norfolk Street by Samuel Shepley (see A Shepley family of Charlesworth). From the order of entries in the 1841 census he appears to have been occupying the full corner property. He is listed in Pigot's directory of 1835 as a currier &c at Howard’s town.

It appears that the enumerator of the 1851 census was unfamiliar with the area as this property and others further along High Street East are listed as Market Street. Samuel Shepley is listed as a leather dealer, with similar descriptions in the directories up to White's of 1862. In the 1861 census Samuel is recorded as an ironmonger. In addition to his son Thomas, his daughter Nancy is living there with her husband Thomas McKnight, a stone mason, and two daughters. In Harrod's of 1870 the business is listed in Samuel's name as an ironmonger, earthenware dealer, leather-cutter, &c. (in High Street).

In the 1871 census the occupiers of 1 High Street East were the family of Thomas and Nancy McKnight, Thomas being described as an ironmonger. Directories in the 1870s and the 1881 census contain separate listings for both Thomas McKnight at 1 High Street East and his brother in law Thomas Shepley at 2 Norfolk Street but describing them both similarly so either they were running as a partnership or in competition next door to each other.

Thomas McKnight retired in 1892. An advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 22 April 1892 announced that W. and A. Bowden had taken over the business of Thomas McKnight at 1 High Street East from 16 April. William Bowden ran the business until June 1902 when it was bought by William Henry Darwent, who moved from number 9 Jackson's Buildings, Victoria Street. William Darwent was listed in the Trades Directory of 1903 but he had been replaced at number 1 within a couple of years by J. Hepworth & Son Ltd., clothiers & outfitters

It has not been possible to find out exactly when Hepworth's took the shop but we know it was before 7 July 1905 as the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of that date carried the first of several advertisements by the Executors of J. H. Parkinson Ltd (dental services) announcing that they would attend every Friday & Saturday over Hepworth's Tailors, Norfolk Square (sic). The services were provided there until the end of September 1909 when the firm started to offer them through the shops of Mrs Large, initially at 79 High Street East and then at 8 High Street East.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 5 November 1909, Hepworth's advertised a clearance sale starting the next day to enable them to make extensive alterations to extend the premises. It may be that the extension took in number 2 Norfolk Street as it appears to have been vacant since James Robinson moved to Jackson's Buildings in September 1903 (see Early occupants of the north end of Victoria Street, Glossop; Jackson's Buildings and its predecessors). The last record found of Hepworth's is in Kelly's directory of 1925.

Between 1925 and 1928, Barclays Bank had moved to 1 High Street East and must have acquired number 2 Norfolk Street at the same time. The properties were completely redeveloped and the bank building is still there at the time of writing (though the bank closed in 2021).

3/3a High Street East

The first mentions of an occupant are in Slater's directory of 1850 and the 1851 census which both list Thomas Greaves, a clog & patten maker. In Kelly's directory of 1881, John Longden, blacksmith, is listed at 3 High Street East. Lack of further directory and census entries may mean that the shop was used in connection with one of the adjoining businesses.

In an advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 18 March 1882, John Mellor announced his retirement from his retail business at 2 High Street East but that he would carry on as a wholesale grocer and seed merchant at Victoria Corn Warehouse, 3a High Street East. John Mellor died on 21 November 1883, at the young age of 48. His executors advertised, on 23 February 1884, that the business would be carried on at 3a High Street East, under the style of John Mellor & Co., by Mr. John William Eversden.

The business was moved to 16 High Street East in 1886, an advertisement appearing in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 27 November announcing that William Henry Bottomley had taken the premises, in addition to his existing shop at 11 High Street East. When numbers 5 and 7 High Street East were put up for auction in May 1891 the lot included the warehouse at the rear of the properties, in the occupation of Mr. W. H. Bottomley. Presumably that was the property referred to as 3a. William Bottomley retired in 1895 and the property became part of Squire Sellers' expanded shop, he having won the auction.

5 High Street East

The first occupant we can be certain of is Ann Shaw, recorded as a shopkeeper in the 1841 census and as a grocer in subsequent records. She was the widow of William Shaw who died on 2 May 1836 and who may have been the grocer in Howard's Town listed in Picot's directory of 1835. In addition to listing Ann, White's directory of 1862 listed an Edwin Shaw, soda water &c. manufacturer in High street. He was probably Ann's son (not to be confused with the music dealer Edwin Shaw, of whom later). Sadly, the business failed that same year. An advertisement in the Glossop Record of 8 February 1862 announced that the household furniture and stock in trade of Mrs Ann Shaw, High Street, were to be sold by auction by John Lewis on instructions of the Assignees in Bankruptcy.

The shop was taken over by George Patchett, a butcher who had previously had a shop further up High Street East (see The Patchett family in the Glossop area). Exactly when he moved to number 5 has not been found but the family is listed there in the 1871 census. The Post Office directory of 1876 lists George Patchett & Son as butchers & brick makers, High Street East. The brick makers were sons Henry (still at the family home in 1871) and Joshua, who was across the road at number 20 in 1871. George Patchett died on 12 December 1879 aged 69.

George's widow, Sarah, continued to live at number 5 for some time, being recorded in the 1881 census as a butcher's widow. No record has been found as to when she moved out but it was before April 1887 as an advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 2 April 1887 stated that Hill's Restaurant, 5 High Street East, provided good substantial dinners for working men at moderate prices plus lodgings or apartments to let. The restaurant was still in business when the property was sold at auction on 13 May 1891, being described as shop & dwelling house at 5 High Street East in occupation of Mrs. Hill as dining rooms.

As noted above, the auction was won by Squire Sellers and number 5 became part of his expanded shop, he being listed there in the Post Office and Bulmer directories of 1895. The Post Office directory also lists Phoebe Alcock, baby linen dealer, at 5 High Street East whilst Bulmer's lists her at number 7. Presumably she had a concession in Sellers' shop.

7 High Street East

The first occupant was Benjamin Greaves, ironmonger & blacksmith, who is listed in the various directories between 1835 and 1857 and in the 1841 and 1851 censuses living with his family at the property. Benjamin Greaves died on 22 March 1860.

In the Glossop Record of 1 December 1860, William Ingerson advertised that he had taken the shop lately occupied by the late B. Greaves. He was in business there for just under two years, moving to Norfolk Street on 8 November 1862 (see The Early Shops and Businesses of the eastern side of Norfolk Street, Glossop).

The next identified occupant is William Clarke (or Clark), boot maker, who advertised in the Glossop Record of 9 December 1865 that he had moved to the shop (which he named The Golden Boot) next door to John Booth, druggist. The advertisements continued until 10 March but from 14 April 1866 (up to 22 September 1866) they named Matthew Walton at The Golden Boot next door to Mr Booth's. Matthew Walton was a well known cricketer of the time, playing for Glossop and making a single appearance for Lancashire in September 1867. He had sold cricketing goods via William Clarke at his previous shop at 55 High Street East, the London House Boot and Shoe Warehouse.

In 1867 Matthew Walton went into business at 24 High Street East. Whether that was in addition to number 7, or instead of, hasn't been established but he was at number 7 at the time of the 1871 census, being recorded there with his family but described as a Cotton loom manager, rather than a tobacconist and cricketer’s outfitter as in directories.

Matthew Walton was succeeded by another cricketer, Thomas Foster who played for Derbyshire between 1873 and 1884. The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 25 March 1882 carried an advertisement for T. Foster (late Walton) Cricketer's outfitter, 7 High Street East; dealer in tobaccos and cigars. How long Tommy Foster ran the business for hasn't been established but he became licensee of the Pear Tree Inn in December 1882 (see below).

The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 23 April 1887 published an advertisement for George Hyde, who was listed in Kelly's directory of 1888 as a milliner & fancy draper at 7 High Street East. On 14 September 1890 there was a serious fire at the shop and the damage was not fully covered by insurance. This possibly caused George Hyde to give up the shop as the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 19 December 1890 carried an advertisement for Sellers Crown Drapery Establishment, 7 High Street East (Hyde's old shop). The shop, together with number 5 and the warehouse at the rear, came up for auction on 13 May 1891, the lot being bought by Squire Sellers, as mentioned above, for £935.

3 to 7 High Street East

Following the auction, Squire Sellers expanded his business into number 5. He is listed at number 5 in both of the 1895 directories but by 1899 (Kelly's directory) his drapery business is listed as occupying numbers 3, 5 & 7 High Street East. When the Glossop Tramway was opened in 1903, Squire Sellers hired a tram, shown in the photograph below, in order to advertise his business.

1903
Tram hired by Squire Sellers outside his shop on 20 August 1903.

Squire Sellers decided to sell the business in 1909/10, moving to Stockport to become a manager for the Glitto Manufacturing Company. The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 4 February 1910 advertised that John Goddard would auction the surplus stock of furniture at his late residence, 45 Norfolk Street, on 14 February. Presumably the business continued to be run by a manager as it was 24 March 1911 when the realisation sale of stock, Sellers Ltd. (formed as a limited company in 1905) being in voluntary liquidation, was advertised in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter.

The first advertisement for Squire Sellers' successor, William Thompson was published in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 14 July 1911 but it wasn't until 30 October 1911 that the auction sale of 3, 5 and 7 High Street East took place. The process had apparently been delayed because the deeds had been lodged as security for a loan and the the lender would not release them. The premises must have also been sold to William Thompson as the next time they were sold the advertisement stated that the premises had been occupied by the owner for many years past. That advertisement appeared in the Glossop Advertiser of 10 September 1926 and stated that the premises had three large windows fronting to High Street East and could be used for a large retail business or divided into two or three shops.

The latter was the outcome.

1932
O'Neill advertisement, Glossop Advertiser 30 December 1932.

In Kelly's directory of 1928 the occupants of number 3 were Sheargolds Ltd., who had a pianoforte warehouse there. The 1936 directory listed T. O’Neill & Son, cycle dealers. The O'Neill business had been there for some time as they advertised in the Glossop Advertiser of 30 December 1932. There are no entries for 3 High Street East in the directories of 1932 and 1941, and the property had nobody living in it at the time that the 1939 Register was taken.

1928
Bolton's advertisement, 1928.

William Bolton, a caterer, is listed as the occupant of number 5 in the directories of 1928 and 1932. Those of 1936 and 1941 list George Peck, fruiterer. He is recorded, with his family, at number 5 in the 1939 register.

1928
North Western advertisement, 1928.

Number 7 was occupied by the North Western Road Car Company Ltd., motor bus proprietors, in 1928 and 1932. The property is not listed in the 1936 directory but was occupied by Herbert Chadwick, furniture dealer, in 1941.

9 High Street East

Pigot's directory of 1835 lists John Booth at Howard’s Town. A druggist and seedsman, an advertisement he placed in the Glossop Record of 6 August 1859 says the business was established in 1829. John Booth was to stay for more than 40 years. He advertised the start of selling out his stock in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 15 September 1877 and appears to have left the following year, being listed in Morris's directory of 1878.

The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 17 July 1880 published an advertisement for Edwin Shaw's Music Warehouse at number 9. He had just moved from number 11. Edwin Shaw died on 29 December 1893. The following March his executors advertised that they were continuing the business “pending disposal to a practical successor”.

1887
9 and 11 High Street East decorated for the Jubilee in 1887

That successor came along quickly for, in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 11 May 1894, the executors advertised that they had disposed of the business to Mr. D. J. Jennings who would carry on the business under the style of Edwin Shaw & Co.

The business of Edwin Shaw & Co. was bought by Alfred Dixon Lord, who was advertising in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter by 7 January 1898. That company didn't last long in Glossop as, on 11 February 1898, the newspaper carried an advertisement stating that the business would be closed on account of it being transferred to the company's Birmingham branch.

Use of the shop then changed completely as the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 17 February 1899 published an advertisement from the new occupant, A. Clarke & Sons, Pork butchers and refreshment caterers. The listing in Kelly's directories of 1899 and 1900 is for James Clarke, pork butcher.

1928
Walter Hurst advertisement, 1928.

The 1900 listing shows how directories were sometimes out of date by being prepared well in advance. The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 5 January 1900 published the first advertisement from another long term tenant of the shop. Walter Hurst & Co., tailors, had moved to 9 High Street East from number 18. The company was to stay there until Walter Hurst retired in 1944.

11 High Street East

The first identified occupant is Joseph Schofield, a butcher listed in the Post Office directory of 1855. He was also recorded in the 1861 census and in White's directory of 1862. John Schofield died, aged 52, on 3 March 1869.

By 12 October 1872, Edwin Shaw was advertising his Piano & harmonium warehouse at 11 High Street East in addition to the original shop at number 22 (early advertisements wrongly say number 21 rather than 11). As mentioned above, he moved next door, to number 9, in July 1880.

1878
Edwin Shaw advertisement, 1878.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 7 August 1880 William Henry Bottomley advertised that he would move from 16 High Street East to 11 High Street East (opposite Mr. Hamnett's, Jeweller) "next Friday" (i.e. 13 August). William Bottomley's wife, Hannah, was Edwin Shaw's sister so the shop stayed within the family. William was to be there for 15 years. An advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 23 August 1895 announced that he was retiring and that the business was being taken over by W. Torkington, late of 14 High Street West.

On 31 July 1896, Edwin Collier advertised in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter that he would sell by auction, on 10 August, numbers 9 & 11 High Street East in the occupation of Mr. D. J. Jennings trading as Edwin Shaw & Co. and Mr. William Torkington. It appears that the properties did not sell for, on 11 November 1898, Edwin Collier advertised again (this time on instruction of the executors of the late William Henry Bottomley, deceased) that he would to sell by auction Nos 9 & 11 High Street East, in the occupation of Torkington's Household Stores and Mr. Alfred Dixon Lord as tenants. The properties were bought by George Ollerenshaw for £1355.

Torkington's Household Stores had been incorporated in 1895, William Torkington being managing director. The company had branches in Chorlton, Bolton, Farnworth and at 23 Station Road, Hadfield as well as the shop at 11 High Street East. Early in 1898 the company became insolvent and went into administration. The Glossop and Hadfield shops were bought by a company named Glossop & Hadfield Household Stores which first advertised in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 28 April 1899.

There is a postscript to the insolvency of Torkington's Household Stores. Apparently, realising what was happening, William Torkington arranged for the shop takings to be given to him, rather than banked. Torkington also arranged for some of the stock to be removed from the shops. In a trial at Manchester in April 1899, Torkington was found guilty of fraudulent misappropriation of money and goods and was sentenced to six months in prison.

ca 1908
Church procession outside Household Stores ca 1908.

Glossop Household Stores were still trading in 1927 as they advertised in the programme for the opening of Manor Park on 17 September that year.
Kelly's directories of 1925 and 1928 list Robert Holdgate, grocer, whilst those of 1932 and 1936 list Harold Booth, butcher, at 11 High Street East.

13 High Street East, Howard Arms

The various large scale maps available indicate that number 13 is a separate building from its neighbours (as it certainly is at the time of writing). However, apart from the 1871 census, in which the property is described as unoccupied, none of the censuses from 1851 to 1911 mention the property at all. Nor have an references been found to it in directories or newspaper reports. The likelihood is that it was used in conjunction with number 11 and/or the Howard Arms over the years.

15 - 17 High Street East, Howard Arms

The first directory to mention the Howard Arms is Pigot's of 1824/5 when John Wagstaff was the licensee. He had created the pub from an old farmhouse about 25 years earlier to take advantage of the new turnpike road. Members of the Wagstaffe family were licensees until Nanny Beeley retired in 1892 (see Wagstaffe family of Bridge End).

1860-1885
Howard Arms; the sign above the door shows James Beeley as licensee (1860-1885)

George Nuttall then became licencee and remained until he died on 25 January 1902. His executors, John James Nuttall and Albert Warrington, were given the licence to carry on the business temporarily. At the Glossop Borough Police Court on 14 April 1902, John Green Hudson was granted a temporary licence which was made permanent on 12 May.
A full list of subsequent licensees for the Howard Arms is provided by the book “History In A Pint Pot”.

19 High Street East

Number 19 seems to have been initially occupied as a dwelling, the first identified occupant being William Davison, a stone mason and his wife, in the 1861 census. The Glossop Record of 25 February 1871 reported on the presentation of a desk to Mr. Thomas Sheridan, 19 High Street East, by the Primitive Methodist Sunday School, Shrewsbury Street, as a mark of the esteem in which he was held as a Sunday school teacher. He must have moved soon afterwards as the record in the 1871 census is for the family of Thomas Nield, a tea dealer.

The Post Office directory of 1876 lists John Wagstaffe, butcher, another member of the Bridge End family who had moved from 10 High Street East by March 1875. He was there for nearly another 15 years, advertising in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 9 January 1891 that he had sold his business to Mr. Isachar Webster. The purchase was not a success as Massey & Hadfield, auctioneers, advertised in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 13 March 1891 that they had instructions to sell, on behalf of Isaac Webster of 19 High Street East, all his butchering plant as he was "declining business".

In an advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 18 March 1892, Mrs. E. Cluskey, late of Glossop House, announced that she had opened her new premises at 19 & 21 High Street East with a large stock of new and second hand furniture.

It appears that the property may have been divided internally at one time, the shop (sometimes referred to as 19a) being on the corner of Ellison Street & High Street East and the other part being associated with 21 High Street East.

The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 14 December 1894 reported on a theft of meat from Moses Darwent, butcher, corner of Ellison Street & High Street East. Moses was listed in Bulmer's directory of 1895 as a butcher at 19 High Street East.

1904
Albert Warrington advertisement 1904

A further report, in the newspaper of 9 October 1896, listed people appointed as special constables. One of them was Albert Warrington, butcher, High Street East. He ran the business for many years, being succeeded by his son Walter who remained there until retiring in 1966.

21 High Street East

The first occupant found is Mary Wagstaffe, recorded as a Proprietor of houses in the 1861 census. Mary, who was listed as a private resident in White's directory of 1862, was the mother of John Wagstaffe, the butcher next door. No occupants are recorded in the censuses of 1871 and 1881 so possibly used in conjunction with number 19. John Wagstaffe advertised an office to let at 21 High Street East in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 11 March 1882.

The office was possibly the one rented by the Borough Council for the Sanitary Inspector, Samuel Dane. A letter from him which was presented to a council meeting in December 1885 bore the address 21 High Street East. He is listed as sanitary inspector there in Kelly's directories of 1888 and 1891.

As mentioned above, Elizabeth Cluskey advertised her move to 21 High Street East on 18 March 1892. A further advertisement on 8 March 1895 gave the address as 21 High Street East with showrooms in Ellison Street. Elizabeth Cluskey died, aged 69, in May 1908. The business was initially taken over by her son George, who is listed in Kelly's directory of 1908 but sold up the following year. The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 4 June 1909 advertised that the shops & dwelling houses 19, 21 & 23 High Street East and 14 & 16 Ellison Street were to be sold by auction.

The shop was taken over by Joseph Edward Robinson, who moved from 16 Norfolk Street. He was recorded in the 1911 census as a glass, earthenware & china dealer. He was also listed in Kelly's directories of 1912 and 1925.

The business appears to then have had several short term owners. Kelly's directory of 1928 lists Harold Newbold, that of 1932 lists Mrs. Geo. H. Miller and that of 1936 lists Mrs. Clara Matthews, all as china & glass dealers.

At the time of the 1939 Register the occupant was Charles Hampson, dental mechanic & optician.

23 High Street East

The property was occupied at the time of the 1861 census by John Webster and his family. He was described as a cotton dresser but the following year, in White's directory, he was listed as a brush and coopery dealer.

Harrod's directory of 1870 lists William Goodwin, bookseller, stationer, &c., who had previously traded at Milltown. William died in November 1881 and the business was taken over by his son John.

In an advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 22 November 1884, Samuel Hollingworth announced that he had bought the newspaper & stationery business of the late William Goodwin, 23 High Street East, established 29 years (going back to the Milltown days). By 7 March 1885, Samuel Hollingworth had two newspaper & stationery shops, at 23 High Street East and 232 High Street West. He was still at number 23 when the Howard Arms and 19a, 21 & 23 High Street East plus outbuildings were put up for auction on 17 August 1885.

There is no entry for number 23 in Kelly's directory of 1888 but that of 1891 listed the shop as being occupied by Edward Burns.

By 16 October 1891, when he advertised in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter, the property was occupied by Francis Bede Ellison auctioneer. A week later he advertised that, on 28 October, he would auction the land and messuages at 19, 21 and 23 High Street East, formerly occupied by Mr John Wagstaffe and others and the slaughter house and building now occupied by Mrs. Beeley.

Bulmer's directory of 1895 lists the shop occupant as John Lambert Sale, bootmaker.

In an advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 22 July 1898, James W. Bowden, watchmaker & optician, informed his customers that he had removed from 32 High Street East to 23 (next to Cluskey's). He stayed until about the end of 1903 when the business was taken over by Samuel L. Roebuck who advertised in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 22 January 1904. He stayed until August 1908 when he moved to number 8 High Street East.

The 1911 census recorded the occupants as the family of Thomas Leonard Podmore, electrician, and his wife Lilian, confectioner. The Kelly directories up to 1928 list a confectionery business in Thomas Podmore's name. The business was taken over by James Thomas Adshead, who was listed in Kelly's directory of 1932, and then by William Farnworth, listed in the 1936 directory and, with his wife Emily, in the 1939 register. William Farnworth died on 20 February 1940 and the business was listed in Emily's name in Kelly's directory of 1941.

25 High Street East, Pear Tree Inn

Hamnett tells us that John Wood of Howardtown Mill leased land on 29 September 1822 in order to build houses to accommodate his workpeople. The land was bounded on the West by the premises of Samuel Collier which had only just been built as a private residence and later became the Pear Tree Inn.

Hamnett also wrote that detachments of the 10th Hussars and 4th Regiment of Foot were called in to deal with a strike of cotton workers in December 1830, the officers being quartered in accommodation provided by John Woolley, an old pensioner of the Life Guards, at the Kings Arms which later became the Pear Tree Inn. He was listed in Pigot's directory of 1835.

At the time of the 1841 census the occupants were Mary Woolley, beer seller, and her two young children Martha and John Richard. Mary was John's widow, they having married at Mottram in 1830. Mary Woolley (widow) married Gaskel Ridings on 5 February 1842 at Manchester Cathedral. By the time of the 1851 census she had been widowed again and was living with her children in Manchester Road, Hyde.

There is no entry in the 1851 census but the Post Office directory of 1855 lists George Scholes there. George Scholes was owner of a famed dog known as Glory Scholes which died on 26 September 1859 and was given a large public funeral when it was buried at Rocks Farm, off Monks Road. At the time the pub was known as the Botanical Tavern.

In the Glossop Record of 8 October 1859, John Lewis advertised that, on the instructions of the executors of the late Samuel Collier, he would auction the Pear Tree Tavern (George Scholes tenant) on 24 October. George bought the inn and remained until 1874 when John Horne became licensee. At Glossop police court on 11 October 1875, his license was transferred to John Ford, auctioneer. Ford remained until 20 September 1882 when he auctioned “The Pear Tree Inn and spacious premises adjoining”, which were sold for £650 to Messrs. Garsides, brewers, Guide Bridge.

1878
John Ford advertisement 1878

At Glossop Police Court on 27 November 1882, the licence of the Pear Tree Inn was transferred from John Ford to Thomas Foster, who had the shop at 7 High Street East at the time. Thomas Foster was landlord for something over 14 years when Robert Moore took over the licence. He was only licencee for a few months as he died, aged only 45, on 25 September 1897. His widow, Martha, took over and remained until she died on 13 February 1902.

At the Glossop Borough Police Court on 3 March 1902 George Dale Snr. was granted a temporary licence for the Pear Tree Inn. He stayed until he died, aged 74, on 7 September 1909. His wife, Annie Dale, then took over.

As with the Howard Arms, a full list of subsequent licensees until the pub closed in 1926 is provided by the book “History In A Pint Pot”.

1927
Newton & Heap advertisement 1927

After closure the pub became offices for Newton & Heap, motor engineers, who are listed in Kelly's directory from 1928 through to 1941. In the 1939 Register, Robert Newton, motor engineer works manager, and his family are listed there.

For the other side of the road see An Early History of numbers 2 to 26 High Street East, Glossop).



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Last updated: 23 February 2022