An Early History of numbers 2 to 26 High Street East, Glossop.

This article aims to document the first hundred years or so of development of the shops and businesses of the western end of High Street East (numbers 2 to 26), using available records in censuses, directories and newspapers. Any additional information will be gratefully received.
I must acknowledge the help of Mike Brown for allowing me to use photos from his collection and to Mike and Lynda Meehan for providing information which they have gleaned over the years.

1920
High Street East looking west from the Howard Arms early 1920s

In early directories and census records, the town centre end of High Street East was often documented as Howard Town, High Street and even Market Street in the 1851 census. It is only by comparing records from various sources that one can work out which businesses were where.

2 to 14a High Street East

Robert Hamnett, in his newspaper articles of 1913, wrote that John Wood expanded his Howardtown Mills site by leasing more land on 29 October 1835. The lease deed mentioned that it was bounded on the North by land and houses belonging to Thomas Howe and Robert Wagstaffe, numbers 2 to 14a, High Street East. Hamnett also wrote that numbers 8 to 14 were built in 1826 by Robert Wagstaffe.

2 High Street East

In his Local Events of the Past column in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 5 February 1909, Robert Hamnett recalled that Thomas Howe, son of Rev. Christopher Howe, leased land on 3 February 1826 and built numbers 2 to 6 High Street East. Hamnett later wrote that Thomas Howe was one of the first persons to open a drapers shop in Glossop, at the corner of High Street East and Victoria Street. Thomas Howe is listed in all of the available directories between 1824/5 and 1835. He subsequently emigrated to Australia but, given that he was referred to in John Wood's lease of 29 October 1835 (above) he appears to have still been there at that date.

It has not been possible to identify the occupant at the time of the 1841 census. However, looking at the 1851 census records it would appear (though not certain) that the occupant at that time was Robert Humble, Linen & woollen draper. He was also listed in Slater's directory of 1850 as a linen draper at Howard's Town.

The next occupant we can be sure of was Joseph Mellor, grocer and corn dealer. He is listed at number 2 in the 1871 census and advertised his business at what he called Victoria House in the Glossop Record of 21 May 1870. Comparing names between 1871 and 1861 enables us to see that the same family was there in 1861. Joseph Mellor died, aged 60, on 15 March 1873 and the business passed to his son, John, who is listed in Morris's directory of 1878 as a wholesale and retail grocer and corn dealer at Victoria House, High street and Victoria street.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 6 August 1881, John Mellor advertised his business for sale and the house and shop (Victoria House, 2 High Street East) to be let as he was retiring. In the advertisement he said that the business had been established upwards of 50 years, presumably harking back to the time of Thomas Howe.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 18 March 1882, John Mellor announced his retirement from retail business and that he would carry on wholesale grocery trading and as a seed merchant at Victoria Corn Warehouse, 3a High Street East. In the same issue, William Webb advertised that he had succeeded to John Mellor at High Street and Victoria Street but it seems that the business didn't last. The newspaper of 1 July 1882 carried another advertisement, from J. Mellor, 3a High Street, stating that the shop was to let again.

It was then that Isaac Jackson came on the scene. By December 1883 he was advertising his range of waterproof goods available from 2 (sic) Victoria Street and 2 High Street East. Eventually, Isaac Jackson, moved his business to premises on Norfolk Street, closer to his house at Holly Mount. That paved the way for a business which would stay on the site for many years. The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 21 August 1891 carried an advertisement from George Brownson of Hyde, announcing that he would shortly open up a branch shop at 2 High Street East, Glossop (The shop lately occupied by Mr. Isaac Jackson).

1904
Brownson's advertisement 1904

Brownson's moved out of the corner property temporarily, to 1 Victoria Street, in March 1899, in order to allow for 2 to 6 High Street East to be redeveloped as part of Jackson's Buildings. I wasn't long before they moved back, though, as they advertised a pre-removal sale in November 1899 and had completed the move by January 1900. The directories of 1928 and 1932 (the last directory entry using the Brownson's name) show that Brownson's has expanded into number 4. The Kelly directories of 1936 and 1941 list Robinson & Wood, tailors, occupying just the corner property, 2 High Street East & Victoria Street.

4 High Street East

The first identified occupant is Thomas Swindells, confectioner, who was recorded in the 1841 census. He is listed in directories and census records until White's directory of 1862 and then moved next door to number 6 in 1863.

We know he moved then because an advertisement by Rowland Jackson, tobacconist, in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 24 March 1877 mentions that his business was established in 1863. The shop became a lock up at that time, Rowland Jackson living in Fitzalan Street. He died in 1897 and it appears that that is when Isaac Jackson acquired the property.

after 1907
Hunters the Teamen, after 1907 as part of the arcade can be seen

Following the redevelopment of the property, in 1900, number 4 was occupied by Hunters The Teamen Ltd, grocers (also known as Consumers Tea Co.). They are listed in the Trades directory of 1903, all the way through to Kelly's directory of 1925. As we have seen, Brownson's then expanded into number 4.

Kelly's directories of 1936 and 1941 list the North Western Road Car Co. Ltd., motor bus proprietors, at 4 High Street East.

6 High Street East

John Hall, tailor & draper, is listed in Slater's directory of 1850, the 1851 census and the Post Office directory of 1855. He is also listed at High Street in White's directory of 1857 but that may refer to 21 High Street West. It hasn't been established exactly when he moved there, but it is known to be before 2 July 1859 because of an advertisement he placed in the Glossop Record.

As noted above, Thomas Swindells moved from number 4 to number 6 in 1863. He had given up the shop, or was in the process of doing so, by 7 March 1881 as Margaret Kenny was granted temporary authority until next transfer day to sell sweets (British wines) “at the shop kept by Mr. Swindells, confectioner”. Margaret Kenny was to run her business as a confectioner & dress maker at number 6 until 1899 when she advertised in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 14 April that she had moved to Henry Street (see The Early Development of Shops and Businesses of Norfolk Square and Henry Street, Glossop). Bulmer's directory of 1895 also lists the fact that Margaret's elder daughter, Maria, had started to run the call office for the National Telephone Co. Ltd. at the premises. It, too, moved in 1899.

At the time of the 1901 census (after Isaac Jackson's redevelopment) number 6 was occupied by the family of Lot Pickford, fish & game dealer. He was described as a greengrocer in a report in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 24 January 1902 and as a fruiterer in the Trades directory of 1903. He had moved on to 117 High Street West by 22 May 1903 as an advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of that date refers to the shop lately occupied by Lot Pickford, High Street East.

An advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 2 October 1903 announced that Squire Sellers was that day opening new premises in Jackson's Buildings (opposite his drapery establishment) for the sale of furniture. Later advertisements by Sellers confirm that the property was number 6. In the newspaper of 8 June 1906, Sellers advertised having engaged a “First Class, Upholsterer, Cabinet Maker and Polisher” so the company could make furniture to customers' own designs on their premises. It was only 18 months later that Sellers gave up that shop.

Isaac Jackson advertised, in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 14 February 1908, that the shop occupied by Sellers Ltd. in Jackson's Arcade was to let. It was probably that decision which led to the comment in the report of 31 July 1908 “The only regrettable sight is the empty large shop we see along the High Street side of Jackson's Arcade.” (see Early occupants of the north end of Victoria Street, Glossop; Jackson's Buildings and its predecessors).

At the time of the 1911 census, the property was occupied by Mary Tanner and her daughter Rebecca, a milliner. Miss Rebecca Tanner was listed as a milliner at 6 High Street East in Kelly's directories of 1925 and 1928. However, Kelly's directory of 1912 lists Mrs Emily Green as a milliner there and advertisements in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter in April and May 1915 show that the business was trading under the name "Madame Emilie" at that time. What the relationship was between Emily Green and Rebecca Tanner has not been discovered.

Kelly's directory of 1932 lists number 6 as occupied by R. E. Grimshaw, photographer. In the directory of 1936 the photography business had changed hands, being owned by Eric Robinson. He later moved his Regent Studio to 3 Victoria Street.

1937
2 to 6 High Street East, 5 February 1937

The 1941 directory lists Thomas Whalley, newsagent. He was recorded at number 6, with his family, in the 1939 Register but had been there since before Glossop's first traffic lights were switched on in February 1937.

8 High Street East

The 1841 census records Edward Dyas, cabinet maker, with his family at Howard Town, as do directories between 1842 and 1850, but the first record that definitely places them at 8 High Street East is the 1851 census. In the Post Office directory of 1855 Edward's wife, Elizabeth, is listed as a smallware dealer, High street. The Dyas family was there until the 1870s when they moved to Gladstone Street, possibly after Elizabeth died in December 1874.

In the 1881 census the property was occupied by Annie Elizabeth Woodcock, her sister Harriette Higginbottom (widow of Tom Higginbottom, former landlord of the Station Hotel in Norfolk Street, who died on 20 December 1874) and nephew Joe Woodcock Higginbottom. Annie and Harriette were running a drapery business, Annie having been listed in the Post Office directory of 1876 and Morris's directory of 1878 as a hosier.

The business changed hands later that year as O. Jackson announced, in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 15 October 1881 that she was re-opening the shop at 8 High Street East (which she called Leicester House) for the sale of drapery, millinery, underclothing and baby linen. That is the only record found of O. Jackson.

Kelly's directory of 1888 lists Miss Alice Rolly, milliner, at number 8. She was living there with her parents, Robert and Nancy, at the time of the 1891 census. They had lived at 54 High Street West in 1881. Robert died in 1893 and Nancy in 1896, and Alice married Samuel John Large on 23 March 1897. The millinery business is listed in his name in Kelly's directories of 1899 and 1900 but at census time in 1901 they were living in King Street, Dukinfield.

The drapery business was being run in 1901 by Annis Austin, who was recorded with her husband Herbert, a mechanic at an iron works, and two daughters in the 1901 census. The Trades directory of 1903 listed the business in Herbert's name.

Kelly's directory of 1908 lists Dobson & Robinson, drapers, at 34 High Street West & 8 High Street East. The first mention found of them is in the local “Trade Directory” advertisements in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 7 April 1905, when they were listed as milliners at 8 High Street East. They were there until December 1907 when they moved to 34 High Street West.

Number 8 had a new tenant by 7 August 1908 as Samuel Roebuck advertised in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of that date that he had moved from 23 High Street East. Roebuck's business must have failed because J. P. Stafford advertised in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 8 April 1910 that, under Deed of Assignment, he would sell by auction the stock in trade and household furniture of S. L. Roebuck on 8, 9 & 11 April.

ca 1912
2 to 8 High Street East, about 1912

Samuel and Alice Large were back at number 8 by mid November 1910, having been at number 79 for some years (they are listed in Kelly's directory of 1908). The advertisements for dental services by the Executors of J. H. Parkinson Ltd., offered through Mrs Large's shop give the address as 79 until 11 November 1910 and 8 from the following week. In the 1911 census, Samuel is recorded as a dyer & cleaner of feathers whilst Alice is recorded as a milliner. The millinery business is listed in Samuel's name in Kelly's directories up to that of 1928.

In Kelly's directories of 1932, 1936 and 1941, Austin Watkins Bradley is listed as running a fruit shop at number 8 and a fishmonger's next door at number 10. He is also listed at 8/10, with his family, in the 1939 Register.

10 High Street East

The original occupants of the property were members of the Wagstaffe family, using it for their butchery business. The first was Robert,who built the block, is listed in the directories of 1828, 1829 and 1835, and was there until his death in 1839. His sons James, John and Thomas ran the business and lived in the premises at various times over the years until John moved to number 19 High Street East by March 1875 as noted above.

1901
Whittingham advertisement 1901

The next occupying family stayed for at least forty years. Francis Whittingham moved his family and his brush making business from 1 Victoria Street at the end of March 1875. Although Francis's son, Thomas, died in June 1911 the business, which also sold hardware, was still listed in the local “Trade Directory” advertisements in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 27 August 1915.

What use the property had over the following ten years or so has not been discovered. There is no entry in Kelly's directory of 1925 but Austin Bradley had opened his fishmonger business by the time of the 1928 directory. As noted above, he then used the shop in conjunction with number 8.

1928
Bradley's advertisement 1928

12 High Street East

The first identified occupant is John Bowden, recorded as a fishmonger in the 1861 census. He was described as a fruiter and shopkeeper in subsequent records, the last being in the Post Office directory of 1876. The family then moved to Mill Street.

The listing in Morris's directory of 1878 is for Jeremiah Hollingworth, greengrocer.

Recorded in the 1881 census was Elizabeth Bowden, a widowed confectioner. She was listed in Kelly's directories of 1881 and 1888 as a shopkeeper.

The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 22 September 1888 published an advertisement by William Tattersall, butcher. His occupation of number 12 was fairly short lived as he advertised for sale a quantity of hay and the utensils of a butcher's business in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 23 January 1891. By the time of the census that year the occupant was William H. Brooks, fishmonger, who moved to 3 Victoria Street by the time the Post Office directory of 1895 was compiled.

The entry in both 1895 directories is for Miss Elizabeth Kidd, confectioner.

12 High Street East is not listed in the 1899 or 1900 Kelly directories (and is marked as uninhabited in the 1901 census) but there are listings in the directories for Ephraim Turner, fruiterer, at 12a.

Photographic evidence shows that the property was occupied by S. E. Potts, confectioner, in April 1901.

1901
2 to 12 High Street East, 26 April 1901

The Trades directory of 1903 lists H. Goddard, baker & confectioner.

The listing in Kelly's directory of 1908 is for Misses A. & B. Nuttall, confectioners, and the property list for the 1911 census notes that the property is a lock up shop occupied by Miss Nuttall.

The next tenant, Miss Mary Thorpe, also a confectioner, stayed longer. She is listed in Kelly's directories of 1912 and 1928 and as Thorpe & Hadfield in Kelly's directory of 1925. The confectionery business was run by John Sykes at the time Kelly's directory of 1932 was compiled but then there was a change of use. Kelly's directory of 1936 lists James Arthur Hall as a ladies' hairdresser. Recorded in the 1939 Register is Betty Sidebottom (later Brooks), another ladies' hairdresser.

14 High Street East

Slater's directory of 1850 and the 1851 census both list John Beeley, grocer & corn dealer, as does the 1861 census and the directories up to 1870. The business then got into difficulties. John Lewis advertised in the Glossop Record of 22 October 1870 that he was to auction the whole of the stock in trade, household furniture and other effects at the house and shop of John Beeley on 24 October, under distress for rent.

The next occupant of whom a record has been found is Edwin Hardy, a hatter, who was listed in Kelly's directory of 1881 and recorded in the 1881 census. It is not known when he entered into the property but his business also got into trouble, in February 1881, and was closed after sale of the stock in October 1881.

Joseph Wain is listed as a smallware dealer in Kelly's directories of 1888 and 1891 and is recorded, with his family, in residence in the 1891 census. The final listings of his business are in the two directories in 1895. In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 9 October 1896, Joseph Wain advertised that he had opened the shop lately occupied by Mr Cooke, Hatter, at 59 High Street West.

Miss Elizabeth Kenworthy then had the shop as a drapery business, being listed in directories between 1899 and 1912.

Kenworthy's
Kenworthy's shop

The directories of 1925 and 1928 list Miss Leah Bennett as running an art needlework repository at 14 High Street East, a business which is listed under the name of Mrs. Ethel Brown in the 1932 directory.

Mrs. Margery Ann Riley is listed as a confectioner in Kelly's directories of 1936 and 1941. She is there with her family in the 1939 Register, the business being described as a cafe & general stores.

14a High Street East

James Hamnett advertised his jewellery business in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 20 May 1876. He is listed in the various directories and censuses up to 1912, the year he died aged 85.
James was the uncle of Robert Hamnett, the Glossop historian, who was his apprentice in his teenage years.

1901
Hamnett's advertisement 1901

The 1911 census and Kelly's directory of 1912 also list his son in law, James Bennett, as a photographer. He is listed as such in the various directories up to 1941, and with his wife Mary Ann in the 1939 Register.

14b High Street East

An advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 28 June 1901 mentioned W. A. Dewsnap's, saddler, at 14 High Street East. The property is listed as being used by Allen Dewsnap, saddler, in the Trades directory of 1903. He advertised as “opposite the Howard Arms” in 1905. He then moved to number 24.

Kelly's directory of 1908 listed John Hardy, boot maker.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 31 December 1909, Absolom Wood, Oil & Colour Merchant and Artist Material Dealer advertised a new stock of wallpapers at his shop there. He is also listed as a painter at 21 Hope Street and 14b High Street East in Kelly's directory of 1912.

The Kelly directory of 1912 also lists John Vernon, florist, at 14b.

16 to 26 High Street East

Samuel Collier built the properties after obtaining a lease of the land on November 10 1824. They were sold to Samuel Robinson who obtained a new lease in September 1879.

16 and 16a High Street East

The property seems to have been a dwelling at the time of the 1851 census, the resident being James Jackson, an operative cotton spinner.

In the Glossop Record of 28 January 1860, Samuel Robinson announced that he was reopening Collier's old corn & grocery warehouse (established 1810) in addition to his existing shop at Bank Buildings (see Bank Buildings, Victoria Street and High Street West). Samuel installed a young William Henry Bottomley, he being described in the 1861 census as a grocer's assistant. Fifteen years later, William Henry Bottomley had taken over the shop, advertising the fact in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 20 May 1876.

The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 1 May 1880 contained a notice that numbers 16 to 26 High Street East would be sold at auction on 3 May by John Ford for S. Robinson. Number 16 was described as a shop, occupant Mr. W. H. Bottomley. Three months later, in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 7 August 1880, William advertised that he would move to 11 High Street East (opposite Mr. Hamnett's, Jeweller) "next Friday".

Samuel Robinson ran the shop again himself but then advertised in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 2 April 1881 to thank customers and inform them that he had let the premises at 16 High Street East to Joseph Edmund Dickenson who would conduct the business with the addition of a steam bakery "now being erected".
Joseph placed an advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 18 June 1881 to say that the new steam oven had been completed.

Joseph didn't stay very long as the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 9 November 1883 contained a large advertisement from William Webb for the grocery business at 16 & 18 High Street East. Two weeks later William Webb advertised that he would carry on the grocery and steam bakery business at 16 High Street East on and after Wednesday 21 November. He lasted only a little over a year as the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 28 February 1885 contained a notice that number 16 was to let.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 18 December 1886, J. Mellor & Co. advertised that they had moved the Victoria Corn Mills from number 3a to opposite the Howard Arms. The company was listed as John Mellor & Co. in Kelly's directory of 1888 but as John William Eversden in the directory of 1891. The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 27 October 1899 contained a notice of J. W. Eversden of 16 High Street East becoming a limited liability company.

The following year, in the newspaper of 16 February 1900, William Eversden of 2 Railway Street advertised that the Old-established Victoria Corn Mills were to let. It took almost a year to find a tenant but in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 25 January 1901, T. W. Hurst of Borough Corn Mills, Glossop, announced that he had opened the Victoria Corn Mills and shop at 16 High Street East.

William Eversden advertised the Victoria Corn Mills, also house & shop at number 18, as to let again on 15 December 1905. He died just under a year later and his widow, Hannah, advertised on 8 March 1907 that Victoria Corn Mills with shop, 16 High Street East and Butcher's Shop adjoining occupied by Messrs. Hamnett & Co., were to be sold by private treaty. The properties can't have sold as the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 23 August 1907 carried a preliminary notice of a sale by auction for the Executors of the late Alderman William Eversden on 9 September of Victoria Corn Mills and shops, numbers 16, 16a and 18 High Street East. The newspaper of 20 September 1907 reported that the properties were bought for £950 by Mr. Harry Middleton.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 15 November 1907, Cooper Brothers “The Expert Photographers from Blackpool” announced that they had taken the premises at 16a High Street East. How the business did is unclear as no further mention has been found of Cooper Brothers.

A report in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 16 September 1910 announced that a Board of Trade Labour Exchange would shortly be opened in Glossop. In the newspaper of 23 December 1910 it was further announced that the formal opening of the Labour Exchange at 16 High Street East, by the Mayor, would take place on 2 January 1911. Kelly's directory of 1912 listed the Board of Trade Labour Exchange (Abel Harrop, manager) at 16 High Street East. It moved to Jackson's Buildings, Victoria Street during World War 1 and, in 1937, to Howard Street.

Kelly's directories of 1925 and 1928 list Sam Ralph as a draper at 16 High Street East. Those of 1932 and 1936 list Richard Lawless, a butcher. He is also recorded, with his family, in the 1939 Register. There is no entry for number 16 in the 1941 directory.

The Kelly directories of 1925 to 1941 all listed Harry Gibbons, boot maker, at 16a High Street East.

18 High Street East

At the time of the 1861 census the property was occupied by John Nield, millwright. Ten years later it was the home of Thomas Allard Pettit, proprietor of the Glossop Advertiser (see Glossop's Early Local Newspapers ).

In the notice of 1 May 1880 that numbers 16 to 26 High Street East would be sold at auction, number 18 is described as a dwelling house, occupant Mr. W. H. Bottomley. It was occupied by Joseph Edmund Dickenson, grocer & provision dealer, at the time of the 1881 census.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 11 April 1885, William Irvine, for the last 15 years gardener for Lord Howard, advised that he had taken a Nursery Ground and Garden at Hawkshead Farm. He gave his home address as 18 High Street East.

The house and shop at 18 High Street East, opposite the Howard Arms, were advertised as to let by William Eversden on 19 February 1887. On 18 June 1887, Samuel Beeley advertised his Cash Drapery Establishment there. His tenancy lasted for four years as, in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 3 April 1891, Samuel Beeley advertised the commencement of his removal sale as he was moving on expiration of tenancy. Samuel moved to 22 High Street West.

The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 5 February 1892 contained an advertisement for the Working Men's Tailoring Depot, 18 High Street East, the manager being named as “Hurst (late Hutt)”. Hutts had a shop further up the road. Walter Hurst stayed for nearly 8 years before moving across the road to number 9 in January 1900.

The house and shop had been advertised to let, in anticipation of its vacancy, in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 3 November 1899. In the event it wasn't until 31 January 1902 that the Misses Phillips & Jeffrey announced in the newspaper that they had opened the shop at 18 High Street East with a choice selection of Millinery and Fancy Goods.

As we have seen, Victoria Corn Mills with shop, 16 High Street East and Butcher's Shop adjoining occupied by Messrs. Hamnett & Co. were sold to Mr Harry Middleton in 1907. J. W. Hamnett & Co., butchers, were listed at 18 High Street East in Kelly's directory of 1908.
J. W. Hamnett was Joseph William, son of Robert the local historian. He had been apprenticed to Albert Warrington, at 19 High Street East, before starting his own business. He emigrated to Canada about 1909 and died there in 1915 after being hit by lightning.
The property listing for the 1911 census refers to number 18 as a shop but with no indication of who was using it at the time.

The lock up shop next to the Labour Exchange was advertised to let by Middleton in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 21 May 1915. It became the offices for Glossop-Dale Rural District Council for a while.

In Kelly's directories of 1925 to 1941 the occupant is listed as James Edward Allan L.R.C.P. & S.Edin., L.R.F.P.S.Glas. physician & surgeon, & medical officer to the Post Office.

20 High Street East

The first record found for number 20 is an advertisement for Thomas Housley, hosiery and smallwares, in the Glossop Record of 6 August 1859. Two months later John Lewis advertised that, on the instructions of the executors of the late Samuel Collier (see The Collier family of Howardtown), he would auction the five shops and dwelling houses, stables and workshops in High Street occupied by Thomas Housley and others as tenants on 24 October. Thomas Housley remained in place until January 1870 when he advertised in the Glossop Record that he had removed to the shop lately occupied by Mr J. Mottram, High Street (next door to Mrs Irlam's, Bookseller).

The occupants at the time of the 1871 census were the family of Joshua and Sarah Patchett. Joshua, a son of George at number 5, was a brickmaker and Sarah a confectioner.

Morris's directory of 1878 lists Miss Margaret Nelson, confectioner, at 20 High street East. She was listed at High Street East in the Post Office directory of 1876 so presumably the same property. In the notice of 1 May 1880 that numbers 16 to 26 High Street East would be sold at auction, number 20 is described as a shop and house, occupant Mrs. Nelson. Mrs Nelson was Margaret's mother, Ann, who is recorded as head of the household in the 1881 census

Kelly's directory of 1888 lists Mrs. Emily Ellison as running the confectionery. A widow, she married Samuel Warhurst, widower, on 12 January 1889 at Holy Trinity, Dinting. Emily was listed in Kelly's directory of 1891 but the 1891 census records Samuel as a confectioner & joiner with Emily, obviously wrongly, described just as his wife. Small advertisements in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter in 1891 indicate that the family was also dealing in second hand Pianofortes and Harmoniums. The Post Office directory of 1895 lists both Emily and Samuel as confectioners.

The business changed hands in 1897. Kelly's directories of 1899 and 1900 list Miss Amelia Hadfield as running the confectionery business. The 1900 listing was out of date as she had moved to 13 Jackson's Buildings, Victoria Street by then. When she applied for a Sweets licence for the new premises she stated that she had moved there on 24 May 1899 but had previously carried on the business of confectioner at High Street East for two years.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 26 May 1899, Mary Jane Turner announced that the shop at 20 High Street East (lately occupied by Miss Hadfield) would be reopened on Friday 2 June as a High Class Confectionery. In the 1901 census, only her daughter Priscilla was listed (with a servant) as resident but the 1911 census recorded Mary Jane Turner as a greengrocer with daughters Priscilla & Edith as confectioners.

1904
Mary Jane Turner's advertisement 1904

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 5 May 1911, George Bowler announced that he had purchased the Confectionery & Catering business recently carried on by the Misses Turner at 20 High Street East. He was listed as a baker in Kelly's directory of 1912 but it hasn't been established when he left.

Kelly's directory of 1925 listed James Marriott as a baker whilst that of 1928 listed Joseph Holmes, also a baker.

By the time Kelly's directory of 1932 was complied, number 20 had become a fried fish shop run by William Clare. He was also listed in the directories of 1936 and 1941 and was in residence with his family at the time of the 1939 Register.

22 High Street East

The Post Office directory of 1855 and White's of 1857 list John Shaw & Son, musicsellers, inventors, patentees, manufacturers & importers of musical instruments at High Street. John Shaw's wife, Mary, was the daughter of Samuel Collier (referred to under number 20 and other properties above). The Shaw family may have been there in the 1851 census but it is not possible to work out whether the entry (just identified as Howard Town) is number 22 or another property. The entry in the 1861 census appears to show that the family was at number 22 by then.

In the Glossop Record of 31 March 1866, Tom Dutton advertised his gas & water fitting establishment which had succeeded John Shaw & Son, opposite the Howard Arms. Tom Dutton was also listed in Harrod's directory of 1870. It appears that Tom Dutton (who already traded in Station Road, Hadfield) only took over the gas fitting side of the business (possibly using outbuildings at the rear of 22) as Edwin Shaw (John & Mary's son) took over the music side and continued to advertise from the premises. The 1871 census recorded both Mary and Edwin at number 22. It was in the following year that Edwin took on the shop at number 11 though he continued to use both for some years, being listed in Morris's directory of 1878 at both 11 and 22 High Street East.

In the notice of 1 May 1880 that numbers 16 to 26 High Street East would be sold at auction, number 22 is described as a dwelling house, occupied by Mrs Shaw. Edwin moved from number 11 to number 9 shortly afterwards and Mary died on 23 December 1880. The property is not listed (so presumably unoccupied) in the 1881 census.

An advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 4 November 1882 indicates that Moses Cooper Son, tailors & drapers, had moved their business from next door at number 24 by then. The company was there for just over 9 years, announcing in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 15 January 1892 that they had moved from 22 High Street East to 28 High Street West.

Bulmer's directory of 1895 lists John William Briggs, clothier, at number 22. No record has been found of when he moved in but he left later that year. John Nelson, practical tailor & cutter, announced in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 18 October 1895 that he opened the shop at 22 High Street East (late Messrs. Briggs & Co.). He was to stay for just under 10 years. He ran one of his regular advertisements in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 2 June 1905 but in the same issue, Manassah Turner, fruiterer, advertised that the house & shop at 22, lately occupied by J. Nelson, tailor, was to let. John Nelson became landlord of the Masons Arms, Hadfield.

Manassah Turner ran several similar advertisements during 1905 but no resulting tenant has been identified. In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 17 January 1908 he advertised the premises to let again, describing them as suitable for Butcher. Again, nothing resulted until, in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 7 October 1910, Daniel Massey (late with Cyrus Garside & Sons Ltd) advertised that he had opened No 22 High Street East as a general and builders' ironmonger. Daniel Massey is listed in subsequent directories. He died in 1931 and the business was taken over by his son, David, who is listed as trading as D. Massey & Son, ironmongers in the directories of 1932, 1936 and 1941. He was living at the premises with his family, described as a plumber & shopkeeper, in the 1939 Register.

1928
Massey's advertisement 1928

24 High Street East

The 1851 census indicates that the property was occupied by Robert Wood, Draper & tailor, with his wife Martha and son James Henry. White's directories of 1857 and 1862 list Martha as a milliner and the same description was recorded for her in the 1861 census. Robert must have been away at the time of the 1861 census as he isn't recorded. Martha was recorded as “wife” rather than head of the household. Martha Wood died on 12 January 1863 and Robert Wood died on 13 August 1863.

Advertisements were published in the Glossop Record between 2 September 1865 and 11 August 1866 for Joseph Dyson, confectioner and dealer in British Wines, opposite the Howard Arms, licensed refreshment rooms. Presumably this was number 24 as the other properties across the road from the pub were occupied by others at the time.

In the Glossop Record of 6 April 1867, Matthew Walton (who had the shop at number 7) advertised that he had opened the shop opposite the Howard Arms. On 23 April 1870, Moses Cooper & son advertised in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter that they had taken the shop lately occupied by Matthew Walton opposite the Howard Arms. In the notice of 1 May 1880 that numbers 16 to 26 High Street East would be sold at auction, number 24 is described as a shop and house occupied by Mr. Cooper. As we have seen, Coopers had moved next door to number 22 by 4 November 1882.

The next occupant identified is Miss Esther Lewis who was listed as a baby linen dealer in Kelly's directory of 1888. The family (which included her parents in the 1891 census and her sister & assistant, Jane, in both 1891 and 1901) appears to have been there until 1905. Manassah Turner advertised in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 19 January 1906 that the house and shop at number 24, lately occupied by Misses Lewis, were to let.

Kelly's directory of 1908 lists William Allen Dewsnap, saddler & harness maker, at 24 High Street East and he is recorded there, with his wife, in the 1911 census.

1928
Hill's advertisement 1928

Kelly's directory of 1925 lists John William Hill, news agent. He died in 1926 and the business was continued by Mrs Lila Hill, who was listed in the directories of 1928 and 1932.

When Kelly's directory of 1936 was complied the news agent business was owned by Coggin & Thornley. In 1941 only Charles Eli Coggin is listed. He was recorded at number 24 with his family in the 1939 Register.

26 High Street East

It has not been possible to identify the occupant in the 1851 census but at the time of the 1861 census the property was occupied by Thomas Wagstaffe, architect & farmer of 36 acres.

In the Glossop Record of 13 April 1867, James Collier advertised “Licensed to Let Post Horse and Trap for hire”, giving his residence as opposite the Howard Arms. In the Glossop Record of 15 August 1868, Samuel Robinson advertised that the house and shop now occupied by Mr. James Collier, Greengrocer, opposite the Howard Arms, was to be let. James married Eliza Hill at St James', Whitfield on 22 September 1868, when he was recorded as a greengrocer of High Street. It is probably then that he moved to 34 High Street West. At the time of the 1871 census the occupants were Mary Wild, widowed greengrocer, and her family. Mary was James Collier's mother. As a widow she had married Joseph Wild (widower) on 18 September 1841 at Glossop. Joseph had died subsequently.

There is no entry for the property in the 1876 directory but Morris's of 1878 lists James Dewsnap, greengrocer and billposter. The property was also occupied in the 1870s by John Bromhall, Saddler & Harness Maker. His advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 7 February 1880 gave his address as 75 High Street West (late 26 High Street East).

In the notice of 1 May 1880 that numbers 16 to 26 High Street East would be sold at auction, number 26 is described as a shop and house occupied by Mr. Turner. This was Manassah Turner, greengrocer, recorded there with his family in the 1881 census and destined to stay for many years. He died in March 1925.

early 1900s
20 to 26 High Street East, early 1900s

Kelly's directory of 1928 lists Frederick Norman Leonard but by 1932, Manassah's son Walter had taken over the business and was listed in the 1936 and 1941 directories as well as the 1939 Register.

For the other side of the road see An Early History of numbers 1 to 25 High Street East, Glossop).



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Last updated: 10 April 2022