An Early History of High Street West, Glossop, between Market Street and Chapel Street.


This article attempts to document the occupants of High Street West, between Market Street and Chapel Street, for about a hundred years from the 1840s, using available records in censuses, directories and newspapers. Any additional information and/or corrections will be gratefully received.
I must acknowledge the help of Lynda Meehan and Mike Brown in preparing this article and for allowing me to use photos from their collections.

1906
High Street West looking west in the early 1900s

The way in which entries were recorded in the 1841, 1851 and 1861 censuses makes it difficult to identify occupation of High Street West at the time. It seems that at least some parts of Chapel Street, George Street, Cross Street and High Street were entered on the enumerator's sheet as Market Street. Another source of confusion is that some premises were listed as Howardtown and it is often not possible to establish exactly where they were. However, by comparison of entries in the censuses with later records it has been possible to identify a few occupants. A similar problem occurred in 1901 because of the enumerator not using property numbers and/or using inaccurate ones.

25 and 27 High Street West

When John Wood, shoemaker of Howardtown, died in 1846 he left his wife Sarah five messuages or dwelling houses in Howardtown on land leased from the Duke of Norfolk in the occupation of Richard Bramhall and others. After her decease the properties were to pass to his son John Wood who had the power, during his mother's life, to build for his own profit and benefit upon the remaining vacant land of that leased.

John Wood junior died in 1856 and left four messuages or dwelling houses in the occupation of Christopher Fielding and others to three surviving brothers - Robert Wood, who had moved to Stalybridge; Charles Wood, grocer of 15 High Street West, and Joseph Wood - and surviving sisters - Sarah Hadfield and Mary Armitage. He also left his interest in the original five properties to those same brothers and sisters plus his brother Abraham.

It appears that 25 and 27 High Street West were two of the properties built by John Wood junior on that “remaining vacant land” and that the corner was completed by the building of 2 to 6 Market Street by Charles, having possibly been started by John. All five properties were owned by Charles Wood by 1860.

25 High Street West

The entries in the 1861 census are rather confusing. We know that Charles Wood, Grocer, owned 25 and 27 High Street West and 2 to 6 Market Street but we also know that John Shepley Mottram advertised his ironmongery shop at “High Street, corner of Market Street”, in the early editions of the Glossop Record in 1859.

The census entry for Charles Wood, Grocer, which is recorded as High Street, is on Folio 13, Page 28 directly after the one for Edward Sykes (who was at 23 High Street West/1 Market Street). There is also an entry for John Mottram, Ironmonger and Leather dealer, also recorded as High Street, on Folio 40, Page 28 and the following entries match up (where occupiers are the same) with the 1871 census for High Street West properties.

The advertisement of 8 August 1868, detailed below, clarifies that the entry for Charles Wood refers to 2 (and possibly 4) Market Street and that number 25 High Street West was occupied by John Shepley Mottram at the time of the 1861 census. He had also been listed at High Street in the PO directory of 1855 and White's directory of 1857.

John Mottram had left (probably to move to 57 High Street West, see below) by 19 July 1861 as that is when Joseph Mycock's tenancy for his drapery business started. Joseph advertised his move from Norfolk Square in the Glossop Record of 20 July 1861. That advertisement is the first record of the property being given the name London House (the name was already used for 55 High Street East, and still is at the time of writing). Mycock's last advertisement for the business was in the Glossop Record of 19 July 1862 and it appears that he then gave it up in favour of his other shop in Hyde.

As a result of a court case in August 1867 (see below), it emerged that Mycock had a partner, Mrs. Haynes, and employee William Holme. When Mycock left (before 19 April 1863), Holme went into partnership with Mrs. Haynes. William Holme started to advertise the business in his name (late J. Mycock) in the Glossop Record of 21 November 1863. The last advertisement found for Holme was in the Glossop Record of 10 November 1866.

On 1 December 1866 the Glossop Record carried an advertisement for Crosby Leighton , saying that he would open a new grocery business in the premises on Friday 7 December. Leighton had just been sacked by Thomas Handford from his grocery business at 23 High Street West (see Town Hall Shops, 5 to 23 High Street West).

Charles Wood then gave Holme and Haynes notice to quit. At the resulting court case in August 1867 it emerged that Charles had accepted the change in tenancy from Mycock to Holme without it being officially changed. Perhaps he was relaxed about a drapery business being carried on there but was not so happy about a grocer's shop next door to his own grocery business. Charles Wood lost the action for ejectment of Holme but regained possession of the shop in April 1868, Leighton advertising in the Glossop Record of 25 April 1868 that he had moved to 19 High Street West.

Charles Wood and his son John took an advertisement in the Glossop Record of 8 August 1868. It stated that Charles was retiring, that John was taking over and had removed to the next shop, at the corner of Market Street, lately occupied by Mr Holme, Draper (London House, High Street). The shop used by Mr C. Wood, next to Market Tavern, was to be let.

John Wood and his family remained in business at 25 High Street West (still retaining the name London House at that time), as a grocer & corn dealer, until he died suddenly, on holiday in Blackpool, on 22 September 1904.

The business was taken over by Joseph and Annie Dearnaley. Annie was John Wood's daughter, the couple having married in 1903 at Howardtown Wesleyan Chapel. The business remained in the family until the 1950s when it was sold to the Burgons grocery chain.

25 High Street West ca 1910
25 High Street West ca 1910

27 High Street West

In his Local Events of the Past column in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 15 August 1885, Robert Hamnett wrote that the first meeting to promote Glossop Cricket Club was held in the cellar of 27 High Street West in 1847. As the club was formed in 1833, this can't be strictly accurate. However, it was in 1847 that the Duke of Norfolk became interested and offered the use of a field in Norfolk Street. A meeting to discuss that could well be the source of Hamnett's story.

At the time of the 1861 census, the shop was occupied by Thomas Brocklehurst, Grocer & pork butcher, who was also listed in White's directory of 1862.

The next available references are Harrod's directory of 1870 and the 1871 census when the occupier was Joshua Wormald, running a boot and shoe warehouse. Joshua Wormald died on 23 November 1871 and the business was run by his wife, Hannah, for just over a year.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 16 March 1872, John Simpson, Pawnbroker & General Clothier, advertised that he had taken the shop lately occupied by Mrs. Wormald where he had a large stock of new and second hand clothing. On 13 September 1873 the newspaper carried a small advertisement stating that a large assortment of hats were available at the shop (referred to as the Mart).

The shop then became home to the stationery and printing business of the Pettit brothers (see Glossop's Early Local Newspapers.). The Post Office directory of 1876 lists Thomas Allard Pettit (also agent for the Hand-in-Hand insurance company) whilst Slater's of the same year lists his brother, Edwin Walter Pettit. Edwin was still listed there in Kelly's directory of 1888 but had moved to Howard Street by the time of the 1891 census.

Kelly's directory of 1891 and Bulmer's of 1895 list Lawton & Co., drapers and hosiers, as the occupants of 27 High Street West, the latter mentioning that the owner was Mrs. Hannah Lawton. The occupant recorded in the 1891 census was Mary Swire, Draper, presumably running the shop for the Lawtons.

By the time of Kelly's directory of 1899 the shop had been taken over by George Woodcock, fancy draper, though the business was actually run by his wife, Phoebe, George being a bookkeeper at a cotton mill. George had previously had the shop at 51 High Street West (see below), giving it up after his first wife died. George and Phoebe married at Altrincham in 1897.

In January 1903 George bought number 31 High Street West (see below) and moved the business there the following year. John Wood advertised in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 29 January 1904 that number 27, occupied by Mr. G. Woodcock, fancy draper, would be available to let from 1 June – a good opening for a Millinery or Drapery Business.

The next known occupant was a branch of Freeman, Hardy & Willis Ltd., boot makers. They first appear in a directory in Kelly's of 1908, though must have moved in earlier as a theft from the shop was reported in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 11 October 1907. They were to stay there until the 1970s when they moved next door to number 25. At the time of the 1911 census the living accommodation was occupied by the family of William Machin, the shop manager. Similarly, at the time of the 1939 register, the family of the then manager, Allan Whittaker, was living there.

29 High Street West

George Georgeson, Hat & Cap Dealer, is the first identified occupant. He previously traded at 28 High Street West but had moved to number 29 before 5 November 1859 as the subsequent tenant of number 28 was advertising his business by that date. George Georgeson subsequently moved to number 63.

In the Glossop Record of 18 February 1865, John Kelly, Tailor and boys' & youths' clothier, advertised that he had moved across the road to next door to Mr. Wormald's, Boot & shoe maker. John Kelly (wrongly named as Thomas in the newspaper) died on 21 July 1869 and the business was taken over by his son, James (though John was still listed in Harrod's directory of 1870).

No definite date has been found for when James Kelly moved to from number 29 to number 19 High Street West (though that shop's previous occupant, David Percival, appears to have moved in August/September 1875).

Slater's Directory of 1876 lists John Woods, Pork butcher, at number 29. The Post Office Directory of 1876 also lists John Woods, Pork Butcher, but, as with other entries, doesn't provide a number. The only other mention of John Woods in a directory is in Harrod's of 1870 when he had a shop in Norfolk Square. In newspaper advertisements for that shop in 1869/70 his name is spelled as Wood. That spelling is also used in a report of a court case in the newspaper of 22 March 1873, when his address is given as High Street West (but no number). It seems, therefore, that John Woods traded from number 29 for a few months but how long can not be confirmed.

Thomas Hadfield advertised on 12 February 1876 that he was removing from number 70 to number 29, lately occupied by J. Kelly, Tailor. He advertised that the move had been completed in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 4 March 1876.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 1 August 1890, Thomas advertised that he had opened new premises at 32 High Street West (formerly Killorn). He intended selling hosiery & shirts at number 29 and operating as a tailor, ready made clothier and hatter at number 32. That venture lasted just over two years, Thomas advertising in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 1 January 1892 that he was starting a sale ahead of giving up number 32 on 21 January.

Thomas moved again in August 1896. The move coincided with the expiration of the lease on 15 High Street West held by Walter Shreeve. Shreeve moved to 29 High Street West and Thomas Hadfield & Son moved in the opposite direction. The moves commenced on Monday 17 August 1896 and the businesses reopened in their new premises on Friday 21 August.

Advertisement for Walter Shreeve 1904
Advertisement for Walter Shreeve 1904

Walter Shreeve was to remain at number 29, in addition to having his other shops, for around ten years or so. The last reference found to him on High Street West was in a report in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 3 August 1906. By the time Kelly's directory of 1908 was prepared the shop had become a branch of the national butchery chain, James Nelson & Sons Limited. There are no available records of how long Nelsons stayed at number 29 but the branch may have closed as a result of Vestey Brothers acquiring both the British & Argentine Meat Co. Ltd. (formed when Nelsons merged with the River Plate Meat Co. in 1914) and the Argenta company (which had a branch in Victoria Street) in 1923.

The Singer Sewing Machine Co. Limited, sewing machine dealers, moved to 29 High Street West from number 37. It is listed at number 29 in Kelly's directories of 1925, 1928, 1932 and 1936.

Kelly's directory of 1941 lists Garsides General Stores, hardware dealers, at number 29. The company had been there for a couple of years at least as the manager, Francis J. Mitchell, was recorded as the occupant with his family in the 1939 register.

31 to 39 High Street West

In his Local Events of the Past column in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 3 December 1909, Robert Hamnett wrote that Thomas Jackson leased land in the Meadow, bounded on the West by an intended street (Cross Street), on 4 December 1834 and built numbers 37 and 39 High Street West.

No mention is made of numbers 31 to 35 but the whole block was certainly under the same ownership later as the properties were part of the same auction held on Monday 2 February 1903.

33 to 39 High Street West ca 1902
33 to 39 High Street West ca 1902

31 (and 33) High Street West

The earliest identified occupant is Thomas Armitage, who was listed in White's directory of 1857 as a Hosier. He was recorded as a coal merchant in the censuses of 1861 and 1871 but as a hosier in White's directory of 1862 and as both in Harrod's directory of 1870. Thomas Armitage died, aged 62, on 2 July 1871.

The hosiery business appears to have been taken over by George Hyde, who was listed in the two 1876 directories (Post Office and Slater's) and then by Thomas Woffenden, listed in Morris's directory of 1878, before the shop received a long term tenant.

An advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 20 September 1879 announced that James Barnes & Son had moved their drapery and millinery business from number 125 to number 31 High Street West. Whilst initial records for James Barnes & Son mention only number 31, they may have occupied both 31 and 33. They were certainly occupying both by 2 June 1833 when they advertised in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of that date.

That the two shops were considered as one is further indicated by the 1903 auction mentioned above, as number 33 is not mentioned (though number 31, in occupation of Messrs. James Barnes & Son, Drapers, is). The report of the auction stated that number 31 (and presumably 33) was sold to George Woodcock, Draper, High Street West, for £750. As noted above, George and Phoebe Woodcock moved their business from number 27 in May 1904. The business continued to be listed, in Phoebe's name, until Kelly's directory of 1925.

Kelly's directory of 1928 lists the occupiers of numbers 31 and 33 as Northern Renovators Ltd. dyers & cleaners.

Four years later the type of business remained the same but was run by H. Greenhalgh & Co. Ltd.. Initially they occupied both shops but by the time of Kelly's directory of 1936 were only using number 31. The company was still listed there in the 1941 directory.

Advertisement for Northern Renovators 1928
Advertisement for Northern Renovators 1928

33 High Street West

The first identified occupant was Aaron Fielding, confectioner & baker, listed in the Post Office directory of 1855, White's directory of 1857 and the 1861 census.

In the Glossop Record of 7 September 1861, Thomas M. Blackburn announced that, because of demand since he had given up the business, he had renewed his licence as an auctioneer & valuer and opened a new auction mart at the shop lately occupied by Aaron Fielding, Grocer. Thomas gave up the shop and reverted to working from his home at Dry Mount (Queen Street) before 16 April 1864.

No further record of number 33 as a separate entity has been found until Kelly's directory of 1936 which lists Miss Annie Pell, milliner.

When the 1941 directory was compiled the property was occupied by Glossop Dental & Optical Service, opticians.

35 and 37 High Street West

The two properties appear to have been used together for a single business for approximately their first fifty years. William Smith was first listed as a boot & shoe maker in High street in the Post Office directory of 1855. William was in business there all his life, dying on 24 March 1898, though some directory entries are in the name of his son Thomas. William's widow, Ann, carried on the business for a few years after his death, the latest mention found being the advertisement for the business in A Sketch of Glossop, 1904.

The two properties started to be used separately after Smith's Boot & Shoe business closed.

35 High Street West

The first directory listing of Walter Ingram Sherry, dairyman, is in Kelly's of 1908. However, a mention of the business has been found in a report in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 26 October 1906. By the time Kelly's directory of 1925 was compiled, the business had become a limited company - Sherry’s Dairy Co. Limited. The business was listed in each of Kelly's directories up to and including 1941.

37 High Street West

Kelly's directory of 1908 lists the occupant as Frederick Bradbury, greengrocer. He wasn't there all that long as by the time of the 1911 census the property was occupied by the family of Albert Allen Cox, Salesman collector for the Singer Sewing Machine Company. The company is listed in Kelly's directory of 1912 but, as noted above, had moved to number 29 by 1925.

Kelly's directory of 1925 lists James and Mary Bullous as running a confectionery business at number 37, though their advertisement is for a florists.

Advertisement for Bullous

There is no entry for the property in the 1928 directory but those of 1932 and 1936 list Mrs. Elizabeth Chanley's fruiterer business.

By the time of the 1941 directory there was another dying and cleaning business in the property – that of J. T. Holderness & Son.

39 High Street West

The first record found of an occupant is in advertisements in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 12 November 1859 by James Murgatroyd. He was recorded there as a draper in the 1861 census and listed in White's directory of 1862. The Glossop Record of 16 May 1863 reported that James Murgatroyd, who had moved to Hull where he was a tobacconist, was being sued for rent and damages to the shop by Thomas Jackson, the shop owner. Murgatroyd had left on 7 January but Jackson alleged that the notice wasn't up until 12 April. Jackson had let the shop to John Boardman on 28 March so failed in the claim for rent but was awarded £2 1s 3d for damages.

No records have been found of how long John Boardman stayed but the shop reputedly became the location of the first provisions store run by the Glossop-Dale New Industrial Co-operative Society in November 1866. The shop became too small and the Co-op business was moved to Norfolk Square about three years later.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 19 March 1870, the Misses Smithies advertised that they intended to open the shop next door to Mr Smith, Shoemaker, on Saturday 25 March, to sell all kinds of millinery and ladies underclothing. That this was number 39 was confirmed by inclusion of the full address in an advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 13 May 1871.

By the time the Post Office directory of 1876 was compiled, Albert Edward Sidebotham, saddler, was in business at number 39. Sadly, he went bankrupt the following year, the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 13 October 1877 reporting on the case.

The empty shop was used for an auction sale by John Ford, on 10 November 1877, of a large assortment of glass, china & earthenware (at the shop lately occupied by Mr. Sidebotham, Saddler).

Morris's directory of 1878 lists Henry Hollingworth as using the shop for his confectionery business, in addition to his shop at 142 High Street West. The occupant at the time of the 1881 census (also listed in Kelly's directory of 1881) was Joe Crowther Platt, a butcher. He was a son of George Platt who had butchers shops at 47 and 49 High Street West (see below). No records have been found of how long Joe stayed in business at number 39.

The next known tenant was Walter Oliver, ironmonger, who moved from number 12 at some time after 31 January 1885 (when he published a newspaper advertisement) and before the preparation of Kelly's directory of 1888. In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 22 November 1901, Walter advertised the last few days of his sale previous to removing from number 39 to number 85 High Street West.

The property was then tenanted by James Lester, Greengrocer. He was the occupant at the time of the auction in February 1903 mentioned above. In that auction, the property was sold to Henry Fielding for £800. He lost no time in moving from number 24, advertising in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 3 July 1903 that he had opened new premises at number 39. The business of E. Fielding & Son, watch & clock makers, is still trading from number 39 at the time of writing.

Advertisement for Fieldings 1904
Advertisement for Fieldings 1904

41 to 47 High Street West

Robert Hamnett, in one of his Local Events of the Past columns, wrote that 25 June 1835 was the date of the lease of the land, to Wright Waterhouse, on which numbers 41 to 47 High Street West and houses in Cross Street were built. They were assigned to Joseph Ashton, linen draper and tenant of number 41, on 10 January 1868 and sold to Alfred Smith, one of the tenants, for £2,000 on 18 December 1872.

41 (and 43) High Street West, Bradford House

John Ashton, linen draper, was listed as being in business as early as the Post Office directory of 1849. John was joined in the business by his son Joseph (mentioned above) by 1855. They were also listed as agents for the Peoples' Provident insurance company in White's directories of 1857 and 1862. The latter directory also indicated an upholstery arm to the business. The Ashtons were still in business when the shop was sold at auction in December 1872.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 16 August 1873, P. Ingham announced his removal from 8 Norfolk Square to number 41 to take over the business of J. Ashton & Son, General drapery. The new business opened on 5 September. “P.” was probably Peter junior who was recorded as a draper in the 1871 census. Peter Ingham senior (who was a builder) died at the age of 52 in December 1874. His widow, Hannah, and family eventually moved to 73 High Street West where the drapery business was continued.

When the Post Office directory of 1876 was compiled, Alfred Smith (previously in business at number 43) had opened a grocer's shop at number 41. He was also listed in Morris's directory of 1878. Alfred was the brother of William Smith of 47 High Street West.

The property was still a grocer's when Kelly's directory of 1881 was compiled and the 1881 census was taken. By then, though, it was being run by Charles Smith Harrison, jun., whose father was also a grocer, at 122/4 High Street West.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 7 November 1885, John Chadwick, pawnbroker & outfitter, announced that he was opening the shop lately occupied by Charles Harrison Jun. Chadwick's advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 15 January 1892 indicated that the business had expanded to include number 43 (and used the name of Liverpool House rather than Bradford House). Subsequent directory entries (up to and including Kelly's of 1928) indicated that the business also used number 2 and 4 Cross Street (Kelly's of 1889/1900 wrongly printed the number as 45). At the time of the 1911 census the properties were lived in by the family of James Knott, a salesman in the business.

The business was then became a branch of Greenwood's, being listed as such in Kelly's directories of 1932, 1936 and 1941. The properties were occupied by the family of the manager, George Ashworth, at the time the 1939 register was taken.

Advertisement for Chadwicks 1904
Advertisement for Chadwicks 1904

43 High Street West, Liverpool House

The first known occupant was Randall Judson, a saddler. He was listed in the Post Office directory of 1849, Slater's directory of 1850, the 1851 census, the Post Office directory of 1855 and White's directory of 1857.

The occupant at the time of the 1861 census was Frederick Taylor, a pawnbroker. He was also listed in White's directory of 1862.

In the Glossop Record of 14 May 1864, Alfred Smith (mentioned above) advertised that he would, that day, open the shop next to Bradford House as a Grocer & corn dealer, with no connection with any other shop (presumably a reference to his brother William).

Advertisements starting in the Glossop Record of 1 January 1870 indicate that Samuel Barber supplied watches & clocks from next door to J. Ashton (previously near Milltown Bar). The advertisements mentioned John Ford as agent in both locations and John Ford was recorded at number 43 in the 1871 census. Some years earlier Samuel Barber had retired on account of failing health so it could be that he was still making and maintaining timepieces but John Ford was marketing them for him.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 12 August 1876, John Ford advertised that on 14 August he would auction the whole of the stock in trade (mainly hats and caps) and the household furniture at 43 High Street West as the (unnamed) owner was declining business. He advertised at number 43 in the Hyde & Glossop Weekly News, and North Cheshire Herald of 30 December 1876 as Late Ford & Higginbottom but a month later was advertising in the same paper from premises at 25 High Street East (Pear Tree Inn where he was licensee) & 123 High Street West.

Morris's directory of 1878 lists James Higginbottom as a general dealer at number 43. He appears to have been there for the next 12 or 13 years. In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 24 October 1890, R. W. Sykes advertised that he had been instructed by James Higginbottom to sell, on 27 October, the stock in trade of a general & toy dealer at number 43. The final directory entry for James Higginbottom is in Kelly's of 1891 but because directories were compiled in advance he may have vacated the premises by the end of 1890.

As we have seen, the premises were subsequently taken over by Chadwick's and combined with number 41.

45 High Street West

The occupants recorded in the 1851 census were Thomas Swires, Clog & patten maker, and his family, also being listed in the Post Office directory of 1849. They were still there in 1861 and Thomas is listed in White's directory of 1862. In the Glossop Record of 29 September 1860, Thomas had advertised that he had no connection with any other shop in the town. Presumably that was prompted by John Swire opening his business at 28 High Street West. By the time of the 1871 census he had retired and the family had moved to Oldham. The last reference found to him in High Street was in an advertisement of a lost dog in the Glossop Record of 21 November 1863.

In the 1871 census number 45 was described as a Lock up shop with no indication, of who, if anyone, was using it. Indeed, no further record has been found for the property until Kelly's directory of 1881 and the census of the same year which identify Charles William Thompson, Tailor & outfitter. He was destined to stay only until the middle of the decade. An advertisement by John Ford in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 19 September 1885 announced that he would sell, on September 18 and 19, the whole of the stock in trade of Mr. W. Thompson, 45 High Street West, as he was giving up the business.

The next occupant found was Elliot Lockwood who ran refreshment rooms at number 45. The first reference found to him at that address is in a report in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 23 July 1887. Elliot was listed in Kelly's directories of 1888 and 1891 but the 1891 census records the property as being occupied by Sam Alsop, a Quarryman.

The restaurant was taken over by Miss Annie Brocklehurst, who was listed in both 1895 directories. The first mention found of her is in a report in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 14 September 1894. The property was advertised as to let in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 4 October 1895.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 28 October 1898, Albert Teasdale advertised that he had moved his grocery business from number 32 High Street West to number 45 (next door to Chadwick's). He was to stay far longer, still being listed in the Chronicle's local Trades Directory in the issue of 31 December 1915.

Lack of available records means that the next reference to the property is in Kelly's directory of 1925 when Hadfield Dairy Co. Ltd., provision dealers, were trading at number 45. They are also listed in 1928 and 1932 but by the time of the 1936 directory the shop was occupied by John Callaghan, who remained until he retired in 1961.

Advertisement for Albert Teasdale 1901
Advertisement for Albert Teasdale 1901

47 High Street West

William Smith, Grocer & tea dealer, was listed in the Post Office directory of 1849, Slater's directory of 1850, the 1851 census and the directories of 1855 and 1857. At some time following the publication of the latter directory, William Smith started trading from 23 High Street West. Whether this was in addition to or instead of number 47 has not been established but he advertised, in February 1860, that he was vacating number 23 and carrying on his business "at his old establishment, High Street". It looks like William remained at number 47 until around the beginning of 1868 as Charles Higginbottom advertised a sale of millinery items in the Glossop Record of 22 February 1868 stating that they had removed for convenience of sale to the shop recently occupied by Mr. W. Smith, Grocer, next door to Mrs. Irlam's. For the last year or so he may have had two shops as he advertised in the Glossop Record of 1 December 1866 that his new establishment, Borough House (number 71), was to be opened on Friday 7 December 1866.

The 1871 census records George Platt, butcher, at number 47. He had been there for some time as he was also listed in Harrod's directory of 1870. In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 8 April 1871, John Ashton advertised the house occupied by Mr. George Platt, butcher, in High Street West, as to let with possession available on 10 May. Presumably that is when George moved next door to number 49.

By 22 February 1873 the premises were in use by W. Parker, Chemist & Druggist. On that date the firm of R. Brierley, Dental Surgeons, Stalybridge, advertised that one of the firm attended at his shop at 47 High Street West. No evidence has been found to establish whether this was William Parker who previously traded at 1 High Street West.

The Post Office directory of 1876 and Morris's of 1878 list George Brown (or Browne), patent medicine vendor.

By the time Kelly's directory of 1881 had been compiled, Edward Smith had moved his boot & shoe business from 129/131 High Street West to number 47, which he referred to as his West End Boot and Shoe Establishment. A couple of years later, Vincent Woodcock (older brother of Matthew of whom later) became manager of the store. He lived on the premises, being recorded in both the 1891 and 1901 censuses. In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 14 October 1904, Vincent Woodcock advertised that, after 21 years as manager, he had purchased the business (by then tradung as Smith Brothers) from Mr. E. Smith. Vincent remained there until his death on 15 November 1912.

Lack of availability of records means that the next identified occupant of number 47 is Noah Moscrop, a jeweller who was listed in Kelly's directories of 1928, 1932, 1936 and 1941.

Advertisement for Smith Brothers 1904
Advertisement for Smith Brothers 1904

49 High Street West

In the Glossop Record of 12 April 1862, John Clarke advertised that he was opening a tailoring, drapery & ready made clothing business next door to William Smith, grocer & corn dealer. He was there for just under three years as Jane Irlam advertised in the Glossop Record of 21 January 1865 that she had removed from number 34 High Street West to premises lately occupied by Mr Clarke, Tailor & Draper, opposite her old shop and next door to Mr. W. Smith, Grocer.

In the Ashton Weekly Reporter, and Stalybridge and Dukinfield Chronicle of 23 November 1867, Jane advertised that she had bought new presses and would now offer printing services in conjunction with her son, William Henry Irlam, under the title Jane Irlam and Son. This was possibly when the move of the business to number 55 occurred, as the advertisements mentioned a new printing establishment.

As noted above, it appears that George Platt, butcher, moved from number 47 at the beginning of May 1871. George Platt remained in business at number 49 until his death, aged 74, on 29 September 1888. George was succeeded in the business by his (second) wife, Grace. Grace died on 2 November 1891, aged 58, and the business was taken over by Alice, daughter of George and his first wife Ann, who ran the business for many years, last being listed in a directory in Kelly's of 1908. Alice married Francis George Sargentson in 8 June 1910 at Littlemoor Chapel but then died suddenly, aged 46, on 26 September 1910. The business went to her nephew, William Platt, son of Joe Crowther Platt (see number 39 above).

An advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 16 May 1913 announced that the two shops and dwelling houses 49 & 51 High Street West in occupation of Mr. W. Platt and Mr. Peter Wood, together with outbuildings &c., were to be sold by auction on 26 May.

Then comes the familiar gap in available records, the next mention found being in Kelly's directory of 1925 when the premises were in use by Irvine Dearnley, painter. He was also listed in the directories of 1928, 1932, 1936 and 1941.

51 High Street West

The first identified occupant is Wiliam Bowden, a clogger and son of John Bowden, landlord of the White Lion in Chapel Street, who announced in the Glossop Record of 16 September 1865 that he had opened the shop opposite Mr. Collier, Greengrocer (who traded at number 34). He continued to advertise until the end of the year but then the advertisements ceased. He appears to have left Glossop before the 1871 census.

The occupants recorded in the 1871 census were the family of Humphrey Downs. He was an overlooker of cotton weavers at the time but would later (by early 1875) become a draper, with his brother Joseph, at number 59 (below).

The occupants at the time of the 1881 census were Hannah Mather, her mother and son. Hannah was the widow of Squire Mather who was listed as an outfitter in the Post Office directory of 1876 and Morris's directory of 1878. Squire had died on 16 February 1881. The Mathers had apparently taken number 51 in 1873 as, in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter 18 April 1885, Hannah announced that she had moved to 53 High Street West, next door to the shop she had occupied for 12 years.

The next known occupant is Hesketh Goddard, a draper, listed in Kelly's directory of 1888. The 1891 census recorded him as an Iron Turner. That may indicate that the business was failing as John Ford advertised in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 17 April 1891 that he had received instructions from Mr. H. Goddard to sell by auction the stock in trade of drapery, baby linen &c at 51 High Street West.

The next available records, the Post Office and Bulmer's directories of 1895, list George Woodcock, fancy draper, at 51 High Street West (see also number 27 above). The business was actually run by his wife, Christina Sophie Jane Woodcock, who had trained as a dressmaker. Christina died on 12 January 1896 and, as a result, George put the business up for sale the following month.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 29 May 1896, Mrs. James Hare announced that she had taken the baby linen establishment recently occupied by Mr. Geo. Woodcock at 51 High Street West. The business was listed in the Trades directory of 1903 but had ended before Kelly's of 1908 was published (see 51 and 53 below).

Advertisement for Peter Wood 1904
Advertisement for Peter Wood 1904

53 High Street West

No exact date for when William Tomlinson, chemist and druggist, left 19 High Street West for number 53 has been found. However, it must have been before 15 April 1868 as that is when Crosby Leighton moved into number 19. William was still in business at the time of the 1881 census.

As we have seen above, Hannah Mather moved from next door in April 1885. Just under two years later she apparently decided to give up the business. In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 15 January 1887, R. W. Sykes advertised that he was to sell a quantity of baby linen, drapery &c at the shop of Mrs. Mather, 53 High Street West.

An advertisement was published in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 28 April 1888 for James Robinson, Painter & paperhanger, at number 53. Just over two years later, in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 23 May 1890, R. W. Sykes advertised that he would sell on 4 June, for Mrs Mather, the shops occupied by Mr James Robinson (53) and Mr William H. Irlam (55). Number 53 was bought by Mr A. Scholes, butcher, St. Mary's Road for Mr Peter Wood of High Street West. In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 24 October 1890, Peter Wood, Milliner, dressmaker &c, advertised that he had moved from 110 High Street West to number 53 (which he later named West End House). The business continued in the name of Peter Wood but his wife, Alice, took a leading role. An advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 7 December 1906 stated that the business of Peter Wood, carried on for last 25 years, would continue under the personal management of Mrs. Wood.

It appears that the business expanded under Alice's management as Kelly's directories of 1908 and 1912 list it at both 51 and 53 High Street West

As mentioned above, an advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 16 May 1913 announced that numbers 49 & 51 High Street West were to be sold by auction on 26 May. No report of the auction has been found but other records tell us that Edwin Bayley opened up as a costumier in numbers 51 and 53 in 1913. The Bayley family continued in business there, selling ladies fashions, until closing in November 1881.

Advertisement for Edwin Bayley 1928
Advertisement for Edwin Bayley 1928


55 High Street West

As mentioned above, Jane Irlam announced the opening of her new printing establishment in November 1867. This was possibly when the move of the business from number 49 occurred. We know she was at number 55 in August 1868 as she is named in the move of Thomas Housley to number 57.

Jane Irlam died, aged 60, on 5 February 1877 and the business was taken over by her son, William Henry Irlam. The property was put up for auction by R. W. Sykes, on behalf of Hannah Mather on 4 June 1890 but was withdrawn as it attracted bids only up to £300. William continued the business as it was at number 55 until deciding, in 1802, to concentrate on printing.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 11 July 1902, John Jenkinson advertised that he had taken over the old established stationery, newsagent and fancy goods business of Messrs. W. H. Irlam. William Irlam was continuing the printing business as usual.

That arrangement lasted about 6 months as William announced, in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 30 January 1903, that he had moved to larger premises at 1 Surrey Street. Two weeks earlier, in the 16 January issue of the newspaper, Messrs. Jenkinson & Hamnett (Late with Messrs. W. H. Irlam & Co) announced that they had commenced business at 55 High Street West as practical high class printers. James Edward Hamnett was a son of the local historian Robert and, like John Jenkinson, had been an apprentice at Irlam's. The business is listed in Kelly's directory of 1908 but only in the name of John Jenkinson, as a bookbinder, stationer & dealer in fancy goods.

By the time Kelly's directory of 1912 was compiled the premises were in use by Joseph Burrows, as a stationer alone. Lack of available records preclude knowing how long he was in business but Kelly's directory of 1925 indicated that the stationery business was in the hands of Clarence Wesley Hudson.

The occupant listed in Kelly's directories of 1928, 1932 and 1936 was Samuel O. Savage, a florist. James E. and Alice Derbyshire had taken over the florist's business by the time the 1939 register was compiled, and are also listed by Kelly's directory of 1941, though the shop continued to trade as Savages.

Advertisement for Jenkinson & Hamnett 1904
Advertisement for Jenkinson & Hamnett 1904

57 to 61 High Street West

In his Local Events of the Past column in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 1 October 1909, Robert Hamnett wrote that the date of lease of the land on which numbers 57, 59 and 61 High Street West were built was 29 September 1834. The properties were built by Robert Garlick on land bounded on the West by the reservoir for Lower Mill (Shepley Mill).

57 High Street West

The first identified occupant is James Branwood, a cotton spinner, who was recorded in the 1861 census.

White's directory of 1862 lists John S. Mottram in High Street. As mentioned above, we know he had left number 25 by 19 July 1861. No record has been found of him moving to number 57 but an advertisement in the Glossop Record of 15 August 1868 announced that Thomas Housley, Smallware dealer, had removed, from 20 High Street East, to the shop lately occupied by Mr J. Mottram, High Street (next door to Mrs. J. Irlam's, Bookseller &c). Two months earlier, in the Glossop Record of 13 June 1868, C. Higginbottom had advertised the auction of the stock in trade, furniture &c on the premises of Mr John S. Mottram, Ironmonger, High Street, Glossop, under distress for rent. Thomas Housley, Smallware dealer, was listed in Harrod's directory of 1870 and the 1871 census.

The property, together with some of its neighbours, was put up for sale in 1875. An auction by John Ford on 2 June included five shops in High Street West occupied by Thomas Housley, Humphrey Downs, Thomas Woolley, George Georgeson and William Barnes (numbers 57 to 65), together with three in George Street as a single lot. The properties were sold to Thomas Woolley (of number 61) for £2,615.

Thomas Woolley decided to sell the other four properties, as single lots. John Ford advertised in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 15 January 1876 that the auction would take place on 17 January. No report of the result of the auction has been found. Notwithstanding the result, Thomas Housley continued to occupy number 57, being listed in the Post Office directory of 1876 and Morris's directory of 1878.

The occupants recorded in the 1881 census were the family of Thomas P. Robotham, a boot salesman. Presumably they were occupying the living quarters whilst the shop was used separately. There are two entries in Kelly's directory of 1881 for the Woodhead family. The traditional stationery, printing & bookbinding business running under Daniel Woodhead's name had moved from number 50 and son Stephen was running a business manufacturing Chinese starch polish. Stephen changed tack later in the year, advertising in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 21 May 1881 that he had commenced The Leipzig Pianoforte Establishment at number 57. Nearly three years later, in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 16 February 1884, Stephen Woodhead advertised that his Pianofortes & organs business had moved to 52 High Street West (Next to Mr. Miller, Grocer).

By the time Kelly's directory of 1888 was compiled, John Thomas Leech had moved his cabinet making and upholstery business from 60 High Street West to number 57. He was there for a little above four years. In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 4 November 1892, he advertised that he had moved from 57 to 79 High Street West, number 57 having been sold. In December 1892 Matthew Woodcock advertised that he was moving from number 34 to the shop lately occupied by Mr. J. T. Leech.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 16 December 1892, Matthew Woodcock advertised that the move was complete and he had just opened at 57 High Street West. He was there for at least 15 years, before giving up the shop to leave just his business in Station Road, Hadfield, operating. The last listing for Matthew in a directory was in Kelly's of 1908.

By the time of the 1911 census, Squire Taylor and his wife had opened dining rooms at number 57 High Street West. The business was still going in 1941, being listed in Kelly's directory of that year. Squire Taylor died on 27 February 1945.

57 High Street West decorated for the Coronation in 1902
57 High Street West decorated for the Coronation in 1902

59 High Street West, The Bazaar

In the Glossop Record of 2 March 1861, Joseph Bowden, draper, advertised that he had removed from Shepley Mill (which was across Chapel Street opposite the Wesley Chapel), to The Bazaar, near to Mr William Smith's, Grocer. Joseph was recorded at the premises in the 1871 census (2 April) but at the same time was preparing to give up the business. James Ardern had advertised that he would auction off the stock at Joseph's Hadfield shop as he was declining business.

No record has been found of when Humphrey Downs moved from number 51 but he was obviously trading from number 59 when the auction of 2 June 1875 was advertised. By the time the Post Office directory of 1876 was compiled, Humphrey had been joined in the business by his younger brother Joseph. Humphrey died, aged 37, in September 1878 and Joseph carried on the business alone. He was recorded, with his wife Alice and mother in law, at number 59 in the 1881 census but no further record has been found until the 1901 census when he and Alice were running a millinery and drapery business in Lytham.

Kelly's directory of 1888 lists John Cooke, hatter, who moved from number 63 at some time after the 1881 census. He remained until retiring in 1896.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 9 October 1896, Joseph Wain (Wain & Son, fancy drapers) advertised that he had opened the shop lately occupied by Mr Cooke, Hatter. He had moved from 14 High Street East. Joseph died on 28 April 1919, by which time the company had been taken over by his son, Thomas. Thomas died on 16 December 1944, a few months after retiring from the business. The company survived under new ownership.

Advertisement for Wains 1928
Advertisement for Wains 1928

61 High Street West

In the 1861 census, the property was recorded as a new shop not finished. Ten years later it was occupied by Thomas Woolley, grocer and his wife Mary (daughter of Joseph Robinson of Norfolk Street, see
The Early Shops and Businesses of the eastern side of Norfolk Street, Glossop). Thomas, who was the brother in law of William Sheppard, grocer at 75 High Street West, and had been apprenticed to him, was recorded as a grocer when he and Mary married on 23 February 1870. Thomas and Mary must have taken the shop after 15 February 1868 as he was mentioned as a shopman in Sheppard's employ in a report in the Glossop Record of that date. Thomas was the brother of Edward Woolley who took over number 75 from William Sheppard. Thomas's obituary in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 20 November 1896 said that he succeeded William Sheppard to the grocery business so possibly he obtained the goodwill when William retired.

As noted above, Thomas bought numbers 57 to 65 High Street West, together with three properties in George Street, when they were auctioned on 2 June 1875. Thomas Woolley died suddenly on 14 November 1896 but the business was carried on by Mary for a few years until she retired to Godley in 1900. Number 61 was put up for auction on 8 August 1900 but was withdrawn at £880 and put up for sale by private treaty at the end of the month.

The grocery business was taken over by Joseph Edwin Buckley who was recorded with his family in the censuses of 1901 and 1911. He was still in business there on 4 June 1915 as he advertised in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of that date.

In the next available record, Kelly's directory of 1925, the shop had been taken over by George Cluskey, furniture dealer. He was also listed in the 1928 directory. The 1932 directory listed Herbert Chadwick, a house furnisher, and that of 1936 listed Eric Fidler, ladies’ hairdressers.

William Pell moved his boot & shoe repair business to number 61 from number 52 in 1936 and is listed in Kelly's directory of 1941. He ran the shop until retiring in 1978.

61 High Street West decorated for the Coronation in 1902
61 High Street West decorated for the Coronation in 1902

63 High Street West

As with number 61, this was an unfinished shop at the time of the 1861 census. George Georgeson, hatter, had moved from number 29 to number 63 by 1 July 1865 as John Kelly had moved into his previous shop by then. George was listed in Harrod's directory of 1870, the property having been given the name Hyde house. George had another shop, at 22 Market Place, Hyde, by the time of the 1871 census. He and most of the family were recorded at the Hyde premises with only son Henry being recorded at number 63.

The Post Office directory of 1876 lists Thomas Georgeson (another of George's sons) in High Street. It also lists John Cooke which indicates that the business may have changed hands whilst the directory was being prepared. John Cooke was listed in Morris's directory of 1878 and recorded in the 1881 census. As we have seen, he moved to number 59 before Kelly's directory of 1888 was published.

The occupant of number 63 listed in that directory was William Wright, chipped potato dealer. William Wright died on 25 July 1890, the business being carried on by his widow, Mary Ann Wright, who was described as a restaurant keeper in the 1891 census. She remarried on 17 December 1900, at St. Peter's, Ashton under Lyne, to Jonathan Waterhouse, a widowed stationer (previously a newsagent at 130 High Street West). In the 1901 census records, Mary Ann was still running the restaurant whilst Jonathan was described as a bookseller & stationer. Mary Ann (using the name Mrs. Wright and giving the reason that she was leaving the town) advertised the shop for sale in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 14 April 1905 as the “oldest established fish & chip business in Glossop”. Jonathan Waterhouse died in December 1907. Mary Ann Waterhouse and her daughters were recorded living in Blackpool at the time of the 1911 census.

No record has been found of when the shop changed hands but Kelly's directory of 1908 lists the business owner as Ernest Stott.

The family of Ernest Albert Joyce (Chip potato fryer) were the occupants at the time of the 1911 census and he was also listed in Kelly's directory of 1912. William D. Pownall was listed as the owner in Kelly's directory of 1925, Ernest Longden in the 1928 and 1932 directories and Robert Bartholomew in the 1936 directory. There are no records for number 63 in the 1939 register or Kelly's directory of 1941.

65 High Street West ca 1910
65 High Street West ca 1910


65 High Street West

The positioning, just before that of the Surrey Arms, of the record of the family of Daniel Woodhead, Master printer in the 1861 census indicates that they were at number 65 at the time. Presumably these were the “more extensive premises” which Daniel had announced that he had taken in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 3 December 1859.

The first mention of Daniel, as stationer, bookseller, printer, bookbinder, newsagent, and agent to the Atlas fire & life office was in the Post Office directory of 1855. Unfortunately the directory does not definitely identify the premises occupied.

In White's directory of 1862, in addition to the listings of Daniel's businesses, there are entries for the hat manufacturing and hosiery interests of his sister, Betty Kaye Woodhead, who would later become the town's postmistress in Norfolk Square.

In advertising her business at 48 High Street West in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 30 July 1870, Eliza Brain stated that it was “Next door to the Chronicle Office”. Daniel must, therefore, have moved from number 65 to number 50 before that date.

The occupant at the time 1871 census was William Barnes, Grocer & corn dealer. So far as location goes he was unaffected by the sale of the property in 1875 referred to above as he was still in situ until he died on 17 April 1894.

The next occupant was Charles Burkhard, pork butcher, who had moved from number 87 in time to be included at 65 in the Post Office directory of 1895. He was there until October 1906 when he deserted his family and went to Sheffield. Apart form occasional visits it was left to Mrs. Marie Burkhard to try to carry on the business and she managed to do so until February 1907 when she persuaded Charles to sell the business.

The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 12 April 1907 carried a report of the marriage of Mary Teresa Siddall of Hadfield and Henry Tattersall of Great Harwood which included the information that the couple were taking over Mr. Burkhard's business in High Street West. Mary died, aged 38, on 20 May 1913. The final record found for the business was in Kelly's directory of 1912.

By the time of Kelly's directory of 1925, number 65 was occupied by R. W. Sykes & Son, auctioneers. The same applied in 1928 with the addition of the office of Northern Counties Estates Ltd. (H. Sykes, secretary).

The entry in Kelly's directory of 1932 is for Leonard Percy Penny, wireless dealer, who had moved from Victoria Street. Four years later the business had become Peak Radio & Relay Services and was also listed as such in Kelly's directory of 1941.

65 to 75 High Street West ca 1871
65 to 75 High Street West ca 1871.
James Slinn is stood at the door of number 73 and carcasses hang at Edward Wooley's butcher's shop, number 75

67 High Street West, The Surrey Arms

In his Local Events of the Past column in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 1 October 1909, Robert Hamnett wrote that 29 September 1844 was the date of lease of the Surrey Arms, built by George Pye, bounded on the East by vacant land intended for a street (George Street). He also wrote that it was sold by John Pratt on 31 December 1875 to John Gardner Sykes, who rebuilt it. In his column in the newspaper of 10 December 1909, Hamnett gives a date of 6 December 1844. Given that that was the date for the lease of numbers 69/71 (see below) it would appear that it was an error.

The pub was advertised to be let in the Ashton Weekly Reporter, and Stalybridge and Dukinfield Chronicle of 14 November 1857 (and subsequent issues). Unfortunately it gave no details of who the landlord/owner was. The first known landlord was James Bolton (or Boulton) who was named in the advertisement of an auction in the Glossop Record of 30 July 1859. He was recorded in the 1861 census as a publican & butcher, together with his wife Phillias (sic) and daughter Charlotte. Phillis Boulton died on 25 July 1865, aged 70, and James died on 27 August 1866, aged 67.

When Charles Higginbottom advertised an auction in the Glossop Record of 4 April 1868, which was to take place at the Surrey Arms, it was described as Miss Boulton's, and the listing in Harrod's directory of 1870 was for Sarah and Charlotte Bolton, spirit vaults, Surrey Arms, High street. In the 1871 census, Sarah Boulton was recorded as Innkeeper and Charlotte simply as her sister. Charlotte married Joseph Holdgate, a Grocer, on 23 October 1872 and Sarah ran the pub alone. She was listed in the Post Office directory of 1876 but then moved to the Magnet at Gamesley, presumably as a result of the sale to John Sykes mentioned by Hamnett. Morris's directory of 1878 lists William Hall at the Surrey Arms.

The entry in Kelly's directory of 1881 is for James Sykes and he is recorded as a Public house manager, with his family, in the 1881 census. Also listed, as a servant/bar man, was Alexander Sturgeon. The book History In A Pint Pot (which is a mine of information on the pubs of Glossop) states that he was actually the licensee in the registers. Kelly's directory of 1888 lists a Thomas Sturgeon.

John Lawrence Wildgoose was the name in the listing in Kelly's directory of 1891, he also being listed as a Hotel Manager in the census that year.

For some reason, both number 67 and number 69 High Street West are listed for the Surrey Arms in the 1891 census entry. Presumably it was an error on the enumerator's part..

The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 4 March 1892 reported that temporary authority was granted to Richard Hesketh to sell at the Surrey Arms in place of Mr. J. L. Wildgoose, the outgoing tenant. He remained in charge until January 1901. The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 11 January 1901 reported that the transfer of the licence to Robert Clifford Steventon had been approved.

Steventon was listed in directories up to Kelly's of 1912. History In A Pint Pot tells us that he was there until 1920, buying the pub from Sykes and then selling it on to Robinson's brewery. James Edward Hamnett (Robert's son) became licensee briefly before he died in 1922, after which his widow, Gertrude, took over for a few months.

The landlord in Kelly's directories of 1925 and 1928 was Harvey Oldfield, and in 1932, 1936 and 1941 it was Joseph Grant.

Advertisement for the Surrey Arms ca 1910
Advertisement for the Surrey Arms ca 1910

69 and 71 High Street West (Borough House)

When Borough House was put up for auction in 1877 the notice stated that the lease of the land was dated 6 December 1844.

In the 1861 census there are entries for two households between the Surrey Arms and James Slinn's shop (which we know from later census records was number 73). The first household consisted of Sarah Harrop and her sister Jane Cooper, milliners & dressmakers, together with Jane's husband and son. Sarah is also listed in the Post Office directory of 1855 and White's directories of 1857 and 1862. The second household was the family of Luke Dewsnap, a tailor. He was also listed in White's directories of 1857 and 1862. When these households moved on has not been identified.

William Smith, grocer and tea-dealer was listed at number 71 in Harrod's directory of 1870 but, as noted above, the shop (which he named Borough House) was opened on Friday 7 December 1866. William died on 9 May 1874 and the business was taken over by his son Thomas, who was listed in the Post Office directory of 1876 and Morris's of 1878.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 28 July 1877, John Ford had advertised that, under the instructions of the executors of the late Mr Smith, he would auction Borough House. The auction took place on Monday 13 August but the lot was withdrawn after a £2,000 bid. The auction notice stated that "The shop is the largest and best fitted in the neighbourhood, and the other portions of the premises are lofty, roomy, and were completed regardless of expense by the late Mr. Smith". This appears to indicate that Borough House (the building still there at the time of writing) was built by William Smith to replace previous premises.

An advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 31 August 1878 announced that John Ford would auction the whole of the shop fittings at Borough House on 4 September.

It was reported in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 7 December 1878 that the Church of England Temperance Society wished to set up a coffee house and to lease Borough House for that purpose. The newspaper of 21 December 1878 reported on the formation of a Coffee Public House limited company and the decision to enter into an agreement to lease Borough House. On 11 January 1879 the Coffee Palace company, having acquired Borough House, advertised for tenders for refurbishment of the building and the building was opened for business on 25 February. The company was successful for several years but by March 1889 the financial position had become untenable and the company was put into liquidation. The goodwill, fixtures, fittings & effects of the company were advertised to be sold by private treaty in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 6 April 1889.

In an advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 13 September 1889, the Star Furnishing Co. announced that is was now open at 69 & 71 High Street West (late the Coffee Palace). The company did not last very long because, in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 11 July 1890, R. W. Sykes to advertised that he would auction the whole of the furniture of the Star Furnishing Company on 14 July.

The British & Colonial Meat Co. butchers, were listed at 71 in the Post Office Directory of 1895, though a report in the Chronicle of 6 April 1894 indicates that the company had taken the premises earlier. The company was also listed in Kelly's directories of 1899 and 1900.

The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 21 September 1900 advertised that The Coffee Palace was to let. Application was to be made to Thomas Smith, Grove Terrace or 15 Railway St, Glossop. The property was recorded as unoccupied at the time of the 1901 census.

A report in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 11 July 1902 stated that the Women's Guild of the Co-operative Society met regularly at Metcalf's Dining Room (the Old Coffee Palace). Other meetings had been held in the premises since the Coffee Palace company closed but this was the first report found to mention a new occupier.
Miss Mary Metcalf, confectioner, had previously been in business at 112 High Street West but no record has been found of when she moved. She was listed in Kelly's directory of 1908 and was the occupant at the time of the 1911 census but no record has been found of when she gave up the shop. There is no listing in Kelly's directory of 1912 either for the premises or Mary Metcalf (who died aged 75 on 15 June 1938).

Kelly's directory of 1908 listed Mrs. Hannah Ingham, dress maker, and her son, James William Ingham, picture frame maker at number 71. They had previously occupied number 73 (see below) but no record has been found of when they actually moved. Hannah Ingham died on 18 December 1910, at Borough House, aged 88 but her son and daughters continued to live in number 71. The 1911 census recorded James as a Picture framer & photographer and his sisters, Mary Jane & Eliza, as dressmakers. Kelly's directory of 1912 listed Eliza as a dress maker and James as a picture frame maker. They must have moved out that year as, in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 3 January 1913, Dobson & Robinson, were advertising that their Noted Millinery Warehouse was now at 69 and 71 High Street West. They had moved from number 34 during 1912. They were still in business using both shops at the time that Kelly's directory of 1925 was compiled.

Advertisement for Dobson & Robinson 1926
Advertisement for Dobson & Robinson 1926

Businesses at the property were listed under numbers 71 and 71a, by 1928. The occupant of number 71 in each of Kelly's directories from 1928 to 1941 was John Francis Cooper, tailor but 71a had several occupants, according to the directories: Edwin Oldham, outfitter, in 1928 (obviously moved out that year); Misses A & L James ladies' outfitters, in 1932 (having moved in during 1928) & 1936 and Miss Edith Goddard, ladies’ outfitter, in 1941.

There is no listing for number 69 in Kelly's directory of 1932 but those of 1936 and 1941 list the Oddfellows’ Hall & Social Institute.

Advertisement for John Cooper 1928
          
Advertisement for A & L James1928
          
Advertisements for John Cooper and A & L James 1928

73 High Street West

The Post Office directory of 1855 lists James Slinn (a native of Eyam), stationer, bookseller & bookbinder in High Street, as does the 1861 census and the White directories of 1857 and 1862. By the time of Harrod's directory of 1870 he had also become a photographer. In the 1871 census he was recorded as a Bookseller & Photographer at number 73, where he had an apprentice named Abraham Slinn. He was also born in Eyam but no relationship between him and James has been found. James Slinn died on 19 March 1873, some eight months after the death of his wife, Hannah. Abraham apparently took over the business, advertising in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter from 17 April 1875 that he intended commencing a photographic club at the premises.

An advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 6 November 1875 stated that, in a plaint regarding the estate of James Pyecroft, deceased, John Ford would sell, on 11 November, two shops & dwelling houses, plus cottage and slaughterhouse, in High Street (lease dated 25 March 1843) in the occupation of Edward Woolley, butcher, and Abraham Slinn, stationer. The lot was sold to Mr. Joseph Holdgate for £919. This must have been the husband of Charlotte Boulton from the Surrey Arms as his father, also Joseph, died in June 1875. James Pyecroft had been recorded, with his family, in Market Street in the 1851 census (though, as noted previously, some street names were inaccurate).

Abraham Slinn was listed as a photographer & stationer at number 73 in the Post Office directory of 1876 and was still advertising his photographic club until 11 November 1876, after which he apparently moved to Sheffield.

The Ingham family appears to have moved in at that time, Morris's directory of 1878 listing John Ingham, draper. In the 1881 census, Hannah was listed as the draper. Her daughters Mary Jane and Eliza were a teacher and dressmaker respectively. Sons John and Peter were stone masons and youngest son James William was a scholar. The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 14 January 1882 advertised that a young ladies school conducted by Miss Ingham (presumably Mary Jane) would commence on 16 January 1882. The Ingham family are recorded as running a drapery and dressmaking business at number 73 for the next 20 or so years, the last record found being in the Trades directory of 1903. As we have seen, they had moved next door to 71 by 1908.

Kelly's directory of 1908 lists Miss Ann Redfern, china dealer, at 73 High Street West. She had previously had a shop at number 56 High Street West. That shop was listed as for sale in December 1902 so perhaps the Inghams had actually moved before the Trades directory listing indicates.
The interval between the occupations by the Inghams and Ann Redfern may well have been the time at which number 73 was rebuilt. It is known, from a postcard posted in August 1904, that the larger shop shown in Ann Redfern's 1910 advertisement (below) had replaced Slinn's smaller premises by that time.

65 to 81 High Street West early 1900s
65 to 81 High Street West from a card posted in August 1904


It appears that Ann Redfern then swapped premises with Alfred Mills, the optician next door at number 75 (see below). In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 24 February 1911, H. & O. Mills announced that they had moved to more convenient premises next door at number 73. The single occupant recorded in the 1911 census was Alfred Oliver Mills, Sight testing optician. He was still there at the end of 1915 as he advertised in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 31 December.

By the time Kelly's directory of 1925 was compiled, John Thomas Martin had taken on the business. He was listed in all the directories up to 1941 and recorded in the 1939 register.

Advertisement for Ann Redfern ca 1910
Advertisement for Ann Redfern ca 1910

75 High Street West

William Sheppard, Grocer, was listed in White's directories of 1857 and 1862 and recorded, with his wife, son and brothers in law in the 1861 census. Although he was also listed in Harrod's directory of 1870, a report in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 15 January 1870 indicates that Edward Woolley, butcher (another brother in law, brother of Thomas of number 61), who was also listed in the directory, may have already taken the shop.

The 1871 census recorded Edward Woolley and his family at number 75. The following two entries (for the families of William Russell, Block printer, and Violet Wild, widow) bear no house number. Presumably they lived in cottages behind the houses fronting High Street, as with other blocks.

As noted above, the premises were sold to Joseph Holdgate in an auction on 11 November 1875. Edward Woolley (also a council alderman) was listed in the Post Office directory of 1876 but the absence of a number means it is not possible to say whether this was for number 75 or number 77.

By 27 January 1877, Samuel McCall was advertising in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter as a pork butcher, calling the premises Cheshire House. His business did not last long and the use of number 75 changed significantly.

Morris's directory of 1878 listed Thomas Bowers, saddler, harness maker, machine strapping and leather hose manufacturer at 75 High street (he also had premises at Ashton-under-Lyne and Denton). In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 15 March 1879, Thomas Bowers advertised that John Bromhall was no longer in his employ and had no connection whatever with his business. It seems that Thomas then sold the Glossop branch to John as the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 7 February 1880 contained an advertisement for John Bromhall (late 26 High Street East) at 75 High Street West.

By the time Kelly's directory of 1881 was being compiled, Isaac Jackson, saddler & harness maker, had moved from his first Glossop shop at 70 High Street West to number 75 (he also had a shop in Station road, Hadfield). The 1881 census not only shows him there with his family and servants, John Bromhall was recorded as a visitor. By December 1883 Isaac had moved to 2 High Street East and 1 Victoria Street.

The next available record is in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 16 May 1885 where Thomas Trainor is listed as an agent for the newspaper. He was listed, as a hairdresser, in Kelly's directory of 1888 (name spelled Traynor).
An advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 4 May 1889 announced that Miss A. Lomas had opened a millinery shop at number 75.
Kelly's directory of 1891 contains listings for both Thomas Traynor and Amy Lomas. In the census, though the occupants were Amy and her father Robert Lomas, a cotton weaver's overlooker.
Amy Lomas married James Boulton Holdgate, son of Joseph (who had died in March 1876) and Charlotte, on 11 October 1893. He announced in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 17 November 1893 that he had opened a Painting, Paperhanging & decorating business at number 75. The last advertisement found from James at number 75 was published on 20 July 1894. The family subsequently moved to Charlestown Road but no record has been found of when.

It may be that the Holdgate family moved in 1894/5 as Bulmer's directory of 1895 listed Herbert Bunn, confectioner, at number 75. He had previously been in business at number 83 and number 81 and subsequently moved across the road to 84 High Street West (presumably in the first quarter of 1895).

Soon after, John Bromhall was back. Describing himself as late manager for Mr. Isaac Jackson he announced in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 15 March 1895 that he had taken over the business carried on by Mr. Jackson and moved it to number 75. He was there until moving to number 64/66 High Street West on 22 August 1902.

The Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 14 April 1905 carried an advertisement for Fred Swann, Jeweller. He continued advertising until 19 October 1906. During part of that time his wife offered dressmaking lessons.

The first advertisement for H. & O. Mills, optician, was published in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 2 November 1906. As we have seen, they were there until moving next door in February 1911, at which time Ann Redfern moved in the opposite direction. At the time of the 1911 census, Ann's sister Selina and niece Gertrude were living with her. Ann was listed in Kelly's directories published from 1912 to 1936, still running the business. She died on 2 September 1936. Selina was recorded as a retired shopkeeper in the 1939 register but listed as a china dealer in Kelly's directory of 1941. She died on 1 August 1943.

Advertisement for H. & A. O. Mills ca 1910
Advertisement for H. & A. O. Mills ca 1910

77 to 83 High Street West (now 77 to 81)

When this block of properties was put up for auction on 21 June 1875, the advertisement included the information that the land was leased on 6 December 1844 to Margaret Byrne of Hollingworth, widow. The auction notice lists the numbers as 77, 79, 81, 83. &c, &c. The report of the auction described the properties as a block of cottages next to the Wesleyan Chapel, consisting of four to the front and two to the back.
They were knocked down to Alderman Woolley, butcher (then occupant of number 75) for £905. The only tenants identified in the auction notice were Sarah Jackson (who we know was at 83 from other records) and John Blackburn (for whom no other records have been found).
As noted below, the properties appear to have been renumbered in about 1889/90 and again in the mid 20th century.

77 (and 79) High Street West

The occupants recorded in the 1861 census were the family of John Logan, a cordwainer.

Advertising an auction in the Glossop Record of 2 July 1864, Edward Wogan (who had been proprietor of the Spinners Arms, Hadfield, and had then run his auction business from a property in the Jerrytown area of High Street West) gave his office address as near the Wesley Chapel, High Street. He was listed as an auctioneer and valuer of High Street in Harrod's directory of 1870. In the 1871 census he was recorded at number 77 with his family, described as an agent and hairdresser.

As noted above, Edward Woolley bought number 77 and the rest of the block on 21 June 1875. Lack of available records means it is not possible to say when he moved from number 75. The first record which gives the number is Morris's directory of 1878. It appears that Edward combined numbers 77 and 79 into one at some point during the 1880s. In the 1881 census, Edward Woolley's butcher's shop is recorded with the number 79 rather than 77. When Edward was nominated for the Board of Guardians in April 1886 his address was given as number 79 High Street West but when he was nominated again in 1889 it was given as 77. At the time of the 1891 census, number 79 was recorded as unoccupied and subsequent records for the business use number 77. Edward died on 18 February 1903 and the business was taken over by his son, Robert Edward Woolley. He was listed in all the directories up to Kelly's of 1941 and was still at number 77 when he died on 16 August 1947.

79 High Street West (now 77a)

The record in the 1861 census is for Margaret Byron, Proprietor of houses. Given that description, it may be that she was the Margaret Byrne named in the 21 June 1875 advertisement as the lessee of the land. The 1871 census recorded the family of Joseph Hall, Joiner, at number 79. No records have been found to indicate when either of the occupants moved into or out of the property. As noted above, the property became combined with number 77 during Edward Woolley's occupancy.

At some time after the death of Robert Edward Woolley (presumably), number 77 was divided into two again, becoming number 77 and number 77a.

81 High Street West (became 79)

Records are sparse for the early years of the property, only the censuses providing information: in 1861 the occupants were the family of Anthony Curby, Coal Dealer; in 1871 the family of Robert Clayton, Labourer; in 1881 Samuel Wild, a general carrier, and his wife Selina. Kelly's directory of 1888 lists Mrs Nancy Kenyon, a draper, at 81 High Street West but no other mention of her has been found.

As we have seen, in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 4 November 1892, John Thomas Leech, Cabinet maker, advertised that he had moved from 57 to 79 High Street West. He wasn't there all that long though as an advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 13 April 1894 announced that the whole stock in trade, fittings, furniture &c of John Thomas Leech, Cabinet maker in bankruptcy, of 79 High Street West and Brook Mill would be auctioned on 17 April.

Edward Woolley advertised the house and shop to let in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 10 August 1894. In the newspaper of 7 September 1894, Henry Wright announced that he would shortly be opening a hosiery and drapery shop at number 79. He described himself as formerly of Glossop (his father was a grocer in Hall Street in 1881 and he lived with his wife, Amelia, in her father's house in Charles Street in 1891). During his occupancy of number 79, Henry named it Knutsford House but took the name with him when he moved to 11 Jackson's Buildings on Friday 19 May 1899.

The next occupants were Eldred and Augustina Booth who advertised for a dressmaking apprentice in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 18 May 1900. Eldred was described as a machine engraver in the 1901 census, it being Augustina who actually ran the drapery and dressmaking business. They were both listed in the Trades directory of 1903 but no record has been found of when they left the property.

Similarly, no record of when John Edward Oliver, a milliner listed in Kelly's directory of 1908, came into occupation. According to census records he was an insurance agent, the real milliner at the time being his sister Adelaide. By the time of the 1911 census, John had married and moved to Shrewsbury Street and Adelaide was head of the household (with her sister, Mary Harriet, a cop winder) at number 79. Adelaide married Sydney Smith later in 1911 and is listed as Mrs. Adelaide Smith, milliner, in Kelly's directory of 1912. She subsequently gave up the business as Mary Harriet, who married William Heap in 1920, is listed as Mrs. Mary H. Heap, milliner, in Kelly's directory of 1925. William is listed as a stationer next door at number 81.

Kelly's directories of 1928, 1932 and 1936 list Misses Kinder, Storey and Hampson as dressmakers at 79 High Street West. The property is not listed in Kelly's directory of 1941.

Advertisement for Kinder, Storey & Hampson 1928
Advertisement for Kinder, Storey & Hampson 1928

83 High Street West (became 81)

The earliest record found for number 83 is the 1861 census which records the occupants as the family of Patrick Clinton, outdoor labourer.

The shop was occupied at the time of the 1871 census by Sarah Jackson, a widowed greengrocer. She had been listed in White's directory of 1862 (though that is likely to be number 64, where she was recorded in the 1861 census) and Harrod's of 1870 and was still there in 1881 when she was recorded in the census.

The property is not listed in either of Kelly's directories of 1881 or 1888 but was advertised to let by Edward Woolley in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 28 April 1888. In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 22 December 1888, Herbert Bunn started advertising Basinettes for sale at number 83.

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 9 May 1890, Herbert Bunn advertised his Basinettes, giving his address as number 81 rather than 83. This would seem to indicate when the properties were renumbered. In the 1891 census Herbert is recorded with his family as a confectioner. As noted above, the family seems to have moved briefly, to number 75, a few years later. Reinforcing that impression is the fact that the Post Office directory of 1895 listed Shrimpton & Co., provision dealers, at 81 High Street West.

No further mention of Shrimpton & Co. has been found, the next mention of number 81 being in an advertisement in the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 11 September 1896 for J. W. Ashton, Tea and provision salesman, next door to the Wesleyan Chapel. Kelly's directory of 1899 listed the business as Ashton & Golightly, provision dealers (as did the directory of 1900, obviously out of date).

In the Glossop-dale Chronicle and North Derbyshire Reporter of 12 May 1899, Joseph Wagstaff (describing himself as late with Mr. S. Hollinworth), announced that he had commenced business at 81 High Street West as a Stationer, Newsagent & Tobacconist. Joseph William Wagstaff died, aged 40, on 28 April 1916, leaving the business to his wife, Miriam Beatrice Wagstaff.

As noted above, Kelly's directory of 1925 lists William Heap as a stationer at 81 High Street West, with his wife Mary as a milliner next door at 79. Mary and William subsequently moved to Southport where they ran a grocery business. Presumably the move happened before 1928 as Kelly's directory of that year, and subsequent years up to 1941, show William's brother, Thornton Heap, running the business of newsagent and stationer. Thornton and his wife, Margaret, left the business in the 1950s.

Advertisement for Joseph Wagstaff 1901
Advertisement for Joseph Wagstaff 1901



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Last updated: 13 April 2022