Glossop Area Schools, Historical Notes.

The Ancient Grammar School, Old Glossop.
The ancient Grammar school of Glossop was founded by Thomas Howard, second Earl of Arundel and Surrey, probably between 1610 and 1629. The survival of records is patchy but it appears to have lasted (with some breaks) until about the middle of the 19th century when it was replaced by the Duke of Norfolk's School.
Several editions of Kelly's Directory mention that The Rev. Christopher Howe, vicar 1793 to 1849 and for 40 years "established a day school at Glossop, in which he personally taught" but it was probably a continuation (or revival) of the old school, rather than the establishment of a new school.
Pigot's Directory of Derbyshire 1835 lists Grammar School, Glossop - Rev Thomas Harrison, master.
Pigot's Directory of Derbyshire 1835 and 1842 lists a school run by Robert Winterbottom at Glossop. Robert Winterbottom was Parish Clerk so he may well have assisted as a teacher.
Bagshaw's Directory of Derbyshire 1846 tells us: Glossop School, an ancient school-house containing two rooms which has lately been enlarged for a Sunday school, the repairs of which have usually been paid out of the churchwardens' account, is endowed with £37 10s., placed out at interest on a turnpike security at 5 per cent. The Duke of Norfolk, who has a considerable estate in this parish, annually makes a voluntary donation for the support of the school, and is supposed to have the appointment of the master. No children are instructed free.

All Saints RC Primary School, Church Street, Old Glossop.
Bagshaw's Directory of Derbyshire 1846 mentions that in connexion with All Saints RC Chapel "are two schools for boys and girls, each calculated to hold about 100; that for the girls was erected at the expense of Miss C. Ellison.".
Slater's Directory of Derbyshire 1850: Built in the 1840's originally for girl pupils and conducted by the Sisters of Charity. The boys school was situated on Talbot Street.
The Post Office Derbyshire Directory 1855: In 1854 they (Roman Catholics) erected a spacious and handsome school for boys, at which nearly 100 are receiving instruction. It also lists Stafford Michael Joseph, master of Catholic schools.
White's History, Gazetteer & Directory of Derbyshire & Sheffield 1857: The girls school is situated at Old Glossop; it was built by subscription in 1844, at a cost of about £500; it will hold about 400 children, and is under the care of the Sisters of Charity. The boys school is situated in Talbot street, and was erected in 1852, at a cost of £1400; it is a handsome stone building, with residence for the master, capable of accommodating 600 children; the average attendance is 60. There is also a night school which is attended by about 100 ; Mr. Wm. Hymers, master. Listed separately is Hymers Wm., master of Catholic school, Talbot st. Listed under Academies: Catholic, (Boys) Talbot st; Wm. Hymers, master and Catholic, (Girls) Sisters of Charity.
White's Directory of Sheffield & 20 Miles Around 1862: The Girls’ Catholic School, at Old Glossop, was built in 1844; and the Boys’, in Talbot street, was erected in 1852.
May 8th; 1867, Five young ladles absconded from the All Saint's Roman Catholic School.
The Post Office Directory of Derbyshire, 1876: There is a mixed school, under Government Inspection, conducted by the Sisters of Charity of St. Paul.
Morris & Co's Commercial Directory & Gazetteer of Ashton-Under-Lyne & District 1878 mentions a mixed school, conducted by the sisterhood of All Saints RC Church. Sisters of Charity of St. Paul (St- Paul‘s Convent) - Mrs. Thompson, lady superior
Kelly's Directory of Derbyshire 1881: Both boys and girls were attending All Saints School in Old Glossop conducted by the Sisters of St Paul.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1891: Catholic, Old Glossop (mixed), for 100 children; average attendance, 60 ; Sisters of the Order of St. Paul, teachers.
Kelly's Directory of Derbyshire, 1895: Catholic, Old Glossop (mixed), for 120 children; average attendance 70; Sisters of the Order of St. Paul, teachers.
Bulmer's Derbyshire Directory 1895: Under Academies and Schools, Catholic School; Sisters of Charity of St. Paul (Apostle).
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1899: Catholic, Old Glossop (mixed), for 120 children; average attendance, 70; Sisters of the Order of St. Paul, tchrs.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1908: Catholic, Old Glossop (mixed), for 120 children; average attendance, 67 ; Presentation Sisters, teachers.
Kellys Directory of Derbyshire, 1912: Catholic, Old Glossop (mixed), for 120 children; average attendance, 60; Presentation Sisters, teachers.
In 1961, All Saints became a Primary School when the new Blessed Philip Howard secondary school was built on St Mary's Road.

Brookfield Public Elementary School.
Bulmer's Derbyshire Directory 1895: Adjoining the church is the day school, comprising one large room and seven classrooms, erected in 1888, at a cost of £1,200, defrayed by Mr. Shepley. There is an average attendance of 160.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1908: Brookfield (mixed), built in 1889, for 300 children; average attendance, 160; Walter Adshead, master; Miss Sarah Marsden, mistress.
Kellys Directory of Derbyshire, 1912: Brookfield (mixed), built in 1889, for 300 children; average attendance, 160; Walter Adshead, master; Miss Sarah Marsden, mistress.

Charlesworth Independent School.
Pigot's Directory of Manchester, Salford &c for 1824-5 lists "Adamson Rev. John, Independent minister and head master of the school, Charlesworth".
Pigot's Directory of Derbyshire 1835 lists Adamson William, Charlesworth.
Bagshaw's Directory of Derbyshire 1846 mentions that the Independents had "a schoolroom, built in 1823.".
Slater's Royal National Directory 1850: Hiles Benjamin, Charlesworth.
White's History, Gazetteer & Directory of Derbyshire & Sheffield 1857: The Independents have a school-room, built in 1823.
Morris & Co's Commercial Directory & Gazetteer of Ashton-Under-Lyne & District 1878: British School, Charlesworth - Josiah Bower, master.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1891: Congregational, Charlesworth, erected in 1823, for 256 children; average attendance, 98 ; Thomas Ramsden Shaw, master.
Kelly's Directory of Derbyshire, 1895: Congregational, Charlesworth, erected in 1823, for 350 children; average attendance 106; Thomas Ramsden Shaw, master.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1899: Congregational, Charlesworth, erected in 1823, for 350 children; average attendance, 106; Mrs. Harrison, mistress.
Kellys Directory of Derbyshire, 1912: Public Elementary, Charlesworth, erected in 1823, enlarged in 1894, for 330 children; average attendance, 92; Clement Read A.C.P. Master.

Charlesworth Methodist Schools.
Bagshaw's Directory of Derbyshire 1846 mentions that the (Wesleyan) Methodists and Primitive Methodists both had a day school.
White's History, Gazetteer & Directory of Derbyshire & Sheffield 1857: The Wesleyan Methodists & Primitive Methodists both have a day school.

Charlesworth St John's School.
April 7th 1851, Charlesworth Church Sunday and Day School opened.
The Post Office Directory of Derbyshire, 1855: A National school, in connection with the Church, has recently been erected by voluntary contributions, under almost overwhelming difficulties with which the Rev. William Purcell had to contend. Bancroft Nancy (Miss), mistress of National school. Wilson Thomas, master of National school.
White's History, Gazetteer & Directory of Derbyshire & Sheffield 1857: states that the National School with a house for the teacher, is a small stone building erected in 1850, which will accommodate 150; the average attendance being about 70. Listed under Academies are Bancroft Nancy, schoolmistress; Booth Sarah B., National school and Rattray James Wilkin, schoolmaster.
According to The Post Office Directory of Derbyshire, 1876: A National School, in connection with the church, has been erected by voluntary contributions, through the exertions of the Rev. Goodwin Purcell.
Morris & Co's Commercial Directory & Gazetteer of Ashton-Under-Lyne & District 1878: There is a National School, for children of both sexes, which was also erected by voluntary subscriptions. National School (St. John’s) - Thos. Shaw, master.
August 30th, 1886, John Layland commenced his duties as schoolmaster of St. John's Day School, Charlesworth.
Kelly's Directory of Derbyshire, 1895 has this entry: National (mixed), for 360 children; average attendance 250; William S. Llewellyn, master.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1899: National (mixed), for 360 children; average attendance, 250 ; William S. Llewellyn, master.
Kellys Directory of Derbyshire, 1912: Public Elementary (mixed), for 262 children; average attendance, 69; Mrs. Caroline Wood, mistress.

Chisworth Primary School, Marple Road, Chisworth.
Built in 1871 as Chisworth Wesleyan School on land next to the Wesleyan Chapel, it was mentioned in White's History, Gazetteer & Directory of Derbyshire & Sheffield 1857.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1891: Wesleyan, Chisworth (mixed), erected in 1P71, for 130 children ; average attendance, 72 ; Mrs. Phoebe Bagshaw, mistress.
Bulmers Directory of Derbyshire, 1895 states that Mrs Phoebe Bagshaw was mistress.
Kelly's Directory of Derbyshire, 1895 has this entry: Wesleyan, Chisworth (mixed), erected in 1871, for 130 children; average attendance, 72; Mrs Phoebe Bagshawe, mistress.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1899: Wesleyan, Chisworth (mixed), erected in 1871, for 130 children; average attendance, 72; Mrs. Phoebe Bagshaw, mistress.
Kellys Directory of Derbyshire, 1912: Public Elementary School (mixed), erected in 1871, for 130 children; average attendance, 87; William Robinson, master.
Hamnet states that the master of the day school in 1852 was Benjamin Hiles, 1877 James Ormerod, 1895 Mistress Mrs Phoebe Bagshaw.
Mrs Phoebe/Phebe Bagshaw (nee Reece) was Mistress for several years (from at least 1876 to 1899).She is a retired teacher on 1901 Census. William Robinson was the teacher according to a 1912 Trade Directory but it is not clear if he was her successor.
The school was closed in 1970.

Chisworth Primitive Methodist School.
Bagshaw's Directory of Derbyshire 1846 mentions "a day school, where about fifty boys and girls attend".

Dinting Church of England School, Dinting Vale.
Built in 1875 and enlarged in 1887 by the Wood family for 450 children and 150 infants
The Post Office Directory of Derbyshire, 1876, in the list of schools, states that Miss Ingram was mistress.
Morris & Co's Commercial Directory & Gazetteer of Ashton-Under-Lyne & District 1878 lists a National School at Dinting.
January 11th, 1886, W. J. Horsey, of Bolton, appointed schoolmaster, Holy Trinity Church Day School.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1891: National (mixed), Dinting, built in 1875 & enlarged by Mrs. Wood in 1887, for 450 children & 150 infants; average attendance,252 children & 39 infants; John Henry Ogden, master; Miss Clara Riley, mistress ; Miss Ada B. Consterdine, infants’ mistress
Kelly's Directory of Derbyshire, 1895, has a list of schools including this entry. "National (mixed), Dinting, built in 1875 & enlarged by Mrs Wood in 1887, for 450 children & 39 infants; William Meakin, master; Miss Clara Riley, mistress; Miss Ada B. Consterdine, infants' mistress.".
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1899: National (mixed), Dinting, built in 1875 & enlarged by Mrs, Wood in 1887, for 320 children & 80 infants; average attendance, 130 children & 52 infants; Miss Clara Riley, mistress; Miss Ada B. Consterdine, infants’ mistress.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1908: Dinting, C. E. (mixed), built in 1875 & enlarged by Mrs. Wood in 1887, for 320 children & 80 infants ; average attendance, 150 children & 52 infants; Thos. Beardwood, master; Miss Ada B. Consterdine, infants’ mistress.
Kellys Directory of Derbyshire, 1912: Dinting, C. E. (mixed), built in 1875 & enlarged by Mrs. Wood in 1887, for 320 children & 80 infants; average attendance, 150 children & 52 infants; Thos. Beardwood, master; Miss Ada B. Consterdine, infants' mistress.

Dinting, Potter's school.
Edmund Potter was a great believer in secular education, and in 1838 he established a day school at Dinting. Mr. Thomas Bailey, a native of Knutsford, was the first schoolmaster, and retired after 18 years service in that capacity. He died at Oldham, 15th September, 1896, aged 80.
Bagshaw's Directory of Derbyshire 1846 mentions that, about six years earlier, Messrs Edmund Potter and Co established a school, "now attended by about sixty children".
Slater's Royal National Directory 1850 lists a school run by William Bailey at Dinting Vale.
White's History, Gazetteer & Directory of Derbyshire & Sheffield 1857: In the vale are the extensive calico print-works of Messrs. Edmund Potter & Co, who, about 16 years ago, established a school, now attended by about 80 children. Listed under Academies is Potter's School, Dinting Vale, Wm. Pilkington

Dinting (Zion) Methodist School, Simmondley Lane.
Built in 1889 to accommodate 323 children.
Bulmer's Derbyshire Directory 1895: Penney Ernest Massey, schoolmaster. Under Academies and Schools, Methodist New Connexion; Ernest M. Penney, master.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1908: Dinting, United Methodist (mixed), erected 1889, for 323 children; average attendance, 122; Ernest Penney, master ; Miss Ethel Leech, mistress.
Kellys Directory of Derbyshire, 1912: Dinting, United Methodist (mixed), erected 1889, for 323 children; average attendance, 96; Ernest M. Penney, master; Miss Irene Booth, mistress.

Duke of Norfolk's Church of England School, Old Glossop.
Originally Endowed and Built, with Master's residence, in 1852 by Henry Charles 13th Duke of Norfolk (when it was known as the Grammar School) and enlarged in 1887 to accommodate 250 boys, 250 girls and 100 infants.
The Post Office Derbyshire Directory 1855: In the immediate vicinity of the church is a large and handsome Grammar school, built and endowed by the present Duke, with residence for the master. It also lists Littler Alfred John, head master of Grammar school and Booth James, second master of Grammar school. Also listed (in the list of traders) are Winterbottom Harriett (Mrs.), mistress of infant school and Winterbottom Joshua, master of infant school.
White's History, Gazetteer & Directory of Derbyshire & Sheffield, 1857, describes the school as "The Grammar School, Old Glossop" and tells us it was "a handsome Elizabethan stone building, erected by the late Duke of Norfolk, in 1852, at a cost of £2000. It is situated at the west end of the church-yard and consists of a boy's, girls' and infants' rooms, with residence for the head-master; the boys' room is 90 feet by 33 feet, and 23 feet high. The master's residence forms the eastern end of the building, and the girls' and infants' rooms the western. It will afford accommodation for above 500 children and the average attendance is about 400." The head master was Mr Alfred J. Littler. The directory goes on to say "The Mechanics Institution, established in 1842, is held in the Grammar School, in connection with which is an excellent collection of upwards of 10,000 volumes of books, besides the leading periodicals. It consists of about 100 members who pay an annual subscription of 5s; Mr Adam Knott, Librarian.". Further information is given under Charities: "In 1852, His Grace the late Duke of Norfolk had the old school taken down and the present handsome structure erected on the site, at a cost of £2,000, and which he munificently endowed with £4000, 3 per cent consols. It is termed the Grammar or Head school, and is capable of accommodating 550 children; the present attendance is above 400, viz., Upper school, 59 boys and 79 girls; Second school, 133 boys; Infants' school, 130. The terms are, boys, classical instruction, 15s. per quarter; Commercial only, 10s. Second school, boys, 4d per week. Girls school, First division 3d., and Second division 2d. per week. The head master receives a salary of £70 per annum (and the fees) with residence; the Mistress £45 per annum, and the Infant schoolmaster £25 per annum, both inclusive of fees, but no residence. The schools are open to children of all denominations.". Also listed: Booth Jas., second master, grammar school; home Sheffield rd and Littler Alfred John, head master, grammar school plus, under Academies: Grammar, Alfred J. Littler, head master; Jas. Booth, second master; Emma Sowter, schoolmistress; & Joshua Winterbottom, infant master.
White's Directory of Sheffield & 20 Miles Around 1862: The Grammar School, at Old Glossop, was erected by the late Duke of Norfolk, in 1852, at a cost of £2,000. The master’s residence forms the eastern end of the building, and the Girls’ and Infants’ Schoolrooms the western; Mr. Wm. Mitchell, master. Listed under Academies are Grammar, Old Glossop; William and Emma Mitchell, teachers.
The Post Office Directory of Derbyshire, 1876, says "In the immediate vicinity of the parish church is a large and handsome endowed school, with residence for the master, built and endowed by the late Henry Charles Duke of Norfolk. There are upwards of 300 scholars on the registers.". In the list of schools it states that William Mitchell was master and Mrs Emma Mitchell, mistress.
Morris & Co's Commercial Directory & Gazetteer of Ashton-Under-Lyne & District 1878: The Grammar School, near the Parish Church, is a handsome edifice, with residence for the master, and was erected and endowed by the late Henry Charles, Duke of Norfolk. Grammar School, Old Glossop - William Mitchell, master; Mrs. Emma Mitchell, mistress
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1891: Endowed, Old Glossop, with master’s residence, built & endowed in 1853 by Henry Charles, 13th Duke of Norfolk, & enlarged in 1887, for 250 boys, 250 girls & 100 infants ; average attendance, 110 boys, 70 girls & 65 infants; Arthur Henry Roberts, master ; Miss Ada J. Ward, mistress ; Miss Mary Mycroft, infants’ mistress.
Kelly's Directory of Derbyshire, 1895, has a list of schools including this entry. "Endowed, Old Glossop, with master's residence, built and endowed in 1852 by Henry Charles, 13th Duke of Norfolk, & enlarged in 1887, for 250 boys, 250 girls and 100 infants; average attendance, 100 boys, 70 girls & 65 infants; Arthur Henry Roberts, master; Miss Moore, mistress; Miss Arnold, infants' mistress.".
Bulmer's Derbyshire Directory 1895: The Grammar School (Old Glossop) was rebuilt by the Duke of Norfolk in 1852, at a cost of £2,000, and endowed by his Grace with £4,000 in the 3 per cent, consols, now £4,200 at 2¾ per cent. It is open to all denominations. There is an efficient staff of teachers; and, in addition to a commercial education, technical instruction, under the scheme of the County Council, is also given. Roberts Arthur Hy., head master Grammar School. Under Academies: Grammar School; Arthur Hy. Roberts, master ; Miss M. E. Moore, mistress ; Miss G. E. Arnold, infants’ mistress.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1899: Endowed, Old Glossop, with master’s residence, built & endowed in 1852 by Henry Charles, 13th Duke of Norfolk, & enlarged in 1887, for 250 boys, 250 girls & 100 infants; average attendance, 100 boys, 70 girls & 65 infants; George A. Howgate, master; Miss Stables, mistress; Miss Arnold, infants’ mistress.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1908: Duke of Norfolk, C. E. Old Glossop, with master’s residence, built & endowed in 1852 by Henry Charles 13th Duke of Norfolk, & enlarged in 1887, for 250 boys, 250 girls & 100 infants; average attendance, 51 boys, 49 girls & 46 infants; Edgar Ollerhead, master.
Kellys Directory of Derbyshire, 1912: Duke of Norfolk, C. E. Old Glossop, with master's residence, built & endowed in 1852 by Henry Charles, 13th Duke of Norfolk, & enlarged in 1887, for 250 boys, 250 girls & 100 infants; average attendance, 51 boys, 49 girls & 46 infants; Edgar Ollerhead, master; Miss Gertrude Oldham, mistress.

Glossop Free School.
Pigot's Directory of Derbyshire 1828-9 lists Fielding Joseph, teacher at the free school, Glossop.
Glover's Directory of Derbyshire 1829 lists Fielding Joseph, teacher at the free school
Pigot's Directories of Derbyshire 1835 and 1842 list Fielding Joseph, Glossop.
August 24th 1849, Joseph Fielding, schoolmaster, Glossop, died, aged 83.
Hamnett recorded that Joseph Fielding opened the school in 1808. He charged fees so "Free" presumably referred to the school being free of religious ties. His charge was 3d., 4d., 5d., and 6d. per week; in winter time he charged each scholar 3d. towards the cost of coal.

Glossop Technical School, Talbot Street.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1899: A new Technical school is in course of erection, the gift of Lord Howard of Glossop.
Kellys Directory of Derbyshire, 1908: The Borough of Glossop Secondary (mixed) School, Talbot street, erected in 1900 by Lord Howard of Glossop, comprises physical & chemical laboratories, art rooms, a mechanical drawing room, a workshop & a dynamo house. The laboratories are well equipped with modern apparatus & appliances. There are now (1908) 60 boys & 40 girls. The school is controlled by the Derbyshire Education Committee; Ralph H. Dickinson Univ. Lond. head master, with 9 assistant & 2 visiting masters.
Kellys Directory of Derbyshire, 1912: The Borough of Glossop Secondary (mixed) School, Talbot street, erected in 1900 by Lord Howard of Glossop, comprises physical & chemical laboratories, art rooms, a mechanical drawing room, a "workshop' & a dynamo house. The laboratories are well equipped with modern apparatus & appliances. There are now (1912) 62 boys & 43 girls. The school is controlled by the Higher Education Committee of the Borough of Glossop; Ralph H. Dickinson Univ.Lond. head master, with 5 assistants & 8 visiting teachers
Kellys Directory of Derbyshire, 1932: The Glossop Grammar School, Talbot street, founded in 1900 by Lord Howard of Glossop, & equipped with physical & chemical laboratories, art rooms & workshops; the laboratories are well equipped with modern apparatus & appliances. The school has advanced courses. In (1) science & mathematics, (2) modern studies; pupils pass on to Oxford, Cambridge, Manchester &c. Universities. The school is controlled by governors appointed by the Education Committee of the Borough of Glossop; Charles H. Chambers B.Sc.Eng. head master.
Kellys Directory of Derbyshire, 1936: The Glossop Grammar School, Talbot street, founded in 1900 by Lord Howard of Glossop, is equipped with physical & chemical laboratories, art rooms & workshops; the laboratories are well equipped with modern apparatus & appliances. The school has advanced courses in (1) science & mathematics, (2) modern studies; pupils pass on to Oxford, Cambridge, Manchester &c. Universities. The school is controlled by governors appointed by the Education Committee of the Borough of Glossop; Charles H. Chambers B.Sc.Eng. head master.
The original Technical School opened on September 24th 1901 with 37 pupils and became a Secondary School after the passing of Balfour's Education Act in 1902.
Following the opening of the council schools in Hadfield (later Castle School) and Pikes Lane (later West End) the school became a Grammar School. A move to a new school on Talbot Road took place in 1959.
The Talbot Road site was enlarged by the erection of a new set of buildingsm starting in 1963, which enabled the merger of the three secondary schools to form Glossop Comprehensive School in 1965.

Glossop (Howard Town) Wesleyan School.
Bagshaw's Directory of Derbyshire 1846 mentions a day school established in 1841, attended by about 120 boys and girls.
White's History, Gazetteer & Directory of Derbyshire & Sheffield 1857: The Methodists have a handsome stone chapel at Howard Town................with a day school, established in 1841, attended by about 120 boys and girls. Listed under Academies is Goodwin Wm., High st.
White's Directory of Sheffield & 20 Miles Around 1862: Listed under Academies is Goodwin Wm., Milltown.
The Post Office Directory of Derbyshire, 1876: In the list of schools, it states that James Nelson was master of the Wesleyan School, High Street.
Morris & Co's Commercial Directory & Gazetteer of Ashton-Under-Lyne & District 1878 lists a Wesleyan School at High Street.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1891: Wesleyan, High street (mixed & infants), erected 1851 for 298 children ; average attendance, 78 boys, 61 girls & 80 infants; James Parker, master; Miss Annie Kippax, infants’ mistress
Kelly's Directory of Derbyshire, 1895: Wesleyan, High Street (mixed & infants), erected 1851 for 400 children; average attendance, 264; R. H. Dickinson, master.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1899: Wesleyan, High street (mixed & infants), erected 1851,for 400 children; average attendance, 264; R. H. Dickenson, master.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1908: Wesleyan, High street (mixed & infants), erected 1851, for 400 children; average attendance, 237; Henry Lindsay Hudson, master ; Miss Adshead, mistress.
Kellys Directory of Derbyshire, 1912: Wesleyan, High street (mixed & infants), erected 1851, for 400 children; average attendance, 237; Mrs. Furniss, mistress.

Hadfield Wesleyan Day School/Council School/Castle School, Hadfield Road.
Pigot's Directory of Derbyshire 1835: Joseph Harrop, Hadfield.
Pigot's Directory of Derbyshire 1842: Samuel Newton, Hadfield
Slater's Royal National Directory 1850: Littlewood Thomas, Hadfield.
White's History, Gazetteer & Directory of Derbyshire & Sheffield 1857: Lister Thos. E., master of Wesleyan Day school.
The Post Office Directory of Derbyshire, 1876, tells us "Here is a Wesleyan Day and Sunday school. Jonah Leach was master.
Morris & Co's Commercial Directory & Gazetteer of Ashton-Under-Lyne & District 1878 mentions, in discussing Bank Street Chapel: The School Room attached will accommodate 350 children, the inside measurement is 52 feet by 30 feet; in addition are eight class rooms, seated all round each having an area of 14 feet 6 inches by 12 feet; Rothwell master.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1891: Wesleyan, Hadfield (mixed), erected 1808, enlarged 1822 & rebuilt 1854, for 300 children; average attendance, 200 ; James Nelson, master ; Miss Maria Nelson, mistress
Kelly's Directory of Derbyshire, 1895, mentions: Wesleyan, Hadfield (mixed), erected 1808, enlarged 1822 & rebuilt 1854, for 300 children; average attendance 200; Jas. Nelson, master; Miss Maria Nelson, mistress.
Bulmer's Derbyshire Directory 1895: Nelson James, master Hadfield School; h Milford house, North road.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1899: Wesleyan, Hadfield (mixed), erected 1808, enlarged 1822 & rebuilt 1854, for 300 children; average attendance, 200; Jas. Nelson, master; Miss Maria Nelson, mistress.
In June, 1906, the Wesleyans having decided not to continue the school, the Glossop Education Committee announced that they had acquired the site of the old school which they proposed to demolish and build a new council school. The contract for the new school was let on January 10th, 1908. The school was to provide accommodation for 300 children and a woodwork and cookery centre for Hadfield children.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1908: Hadfield, Council (mixed), erected in 1908, for 300 children ; average attendance, 160; Benjamin Whiteley, master; Miss Margaret Loxley, infants’ mistress.
Kellys Directory of Derbyshire, 1912: Hadfield, Council (mixed), erected in 1908, for 300 children; average attendance, 167; Benjamin Whiteley, master; Miss Margaret Loxley, infants' mistress.

Kingsmoor School.
Kingsmoor School was a mixed Boarding/Day School on co-educational lines, which had Preparatory, Junior & Senior departments. It was situated in Glossop Hall, the former residence of Lord Howard of Glossop, from 1927 to 1956.
The founder and first Headmaster was Mr George Raymond Swaine, 1927 to 1952, the second was Mr H L Woodward 1952 to 1956. After relocation to Oakwood Hall, Romiley, Miss Dora Healey became Headmistress.
The costs of running the school at Glossop Hall became too much and the school nearly closed in 1956. It was saved by a committee formed by parents and moved to Oakwood Hall, Romiley. Following the move of St Andrew's Hadfield from Railway Street to Hadfield Road in 1965, Kingsmoor took over the Railway Street premises.
Kellys Directory of Derbyshire, 1932: Kingsmoor School, established in Glossop Hall, the former residence of Lord Howard of Glossop, is under the control of a council appointed by Kingsmoor School Ltd. the owners of the school property. The school is governed by the head master, assisted by the teaching staff & the boys & girls themselves. It is a mixed boarding school on co-educational lines & has preparatory, junior & senior departments; George Raymond Swains, head master.
Kellys Directory of Derbyshire, 1936: Kingsmoor School, established in Glossop Hall, the former residence of Lord Howard of Glossop, is under the control of a council appointed by Kingsmoor School Ltd. the owners of the school property. The school is governed by the head master, assisted by the teaching staff & the boys & girls themselves. It is a mixed boarding school on co-educational lines & has preparatory, junior & senior departments; George Raymond Swaine, head master.

Littlemoor school.
The original Littlemoor school (built in 1840) was on King Street, at the end that crosses Gladstone Street and runs along the top of Collier Street (Collier Brew), off Victoria Street.
Pigot's Directory of Derbyshire 1835 lists, under Academies and Schools, John Garlick, Whitfield.
June 20th 1846, John Garlick, schoolmaster, Littlemoor, died, aged 44.
Bagshaw's Directory of Derbyshire 1846: In connection with the Independent chapel at Little Moor, is a day school conducted on the British School system of education; 120 boys and girls attend.
Slater's Royal National Directory 1850: Wood Samuel, Little moor.
February 6th 1854, Patrick Berrogan, school-master, Littlemoor, died, aged 45.
White's History, Gazetteer & Directory of Derbyshire & Sheffield, 1857, states "In connection with the Independent chapel at Littlemoor, is an Infant school."
September 10th, 1865, David Scott, schoolmaster, Littlemoor, died, aged 50.
The list of schools in The Post Office Directory of Derbyshire, 1876, tells us that Miss Dyas was mistress of the Independent School.
Morris & Co's Commercial Directory & Gazetteer of Ashton-Under-Lyne & District 1878: Congregational School (Littlemoor), King st - Miss Martha Dyas, mistress.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1891: Littlemoor Congregational schools, Victoria street, erected in 1881 at a cost, including fittings, of about £3,000, form a building of stone in the Italian style, and will hold 700 scholars ; the schools are also used for lectures and concerts, and can be arranged so as to seat 1,000 persons: the front entrance, facing Victoria street, is surmounted by a turret 75 feet high. Congregational,Victoria street (mixed), built in 1881, for 700 children; average attendance, 270; Mr. Joseph Walkden, master ; Miss M. I. G. Scafe, infants' mistress
Kelly's Directory of Derbyshire, 1895, mentions: Congregational, Victoria street (mixed), built in 1881, for 700 children; average attendance 270; Mr Joseph Walkden, master; Miss M. I. G. Scaife, infants' mistress.
Bulmer's Derbyshire Directory 1895: Under Academies and Schools, Littlemoor Congregational; Joseph Walkden, master.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1899: Congregational, Victoria street (mixed), built in 1881, for 700 children; average attendance, 340; Joseph Walkden, master; Miss M. Jones, infants’ mistress.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1908: Littlemore, Council, Victoria street (mixed), built in 1881, for 700 children; average attendance, 340, William Harvey Lawton, master; Miss F. Cordingley, infants’ mistress.
Kellys Directory of Derbyshire, 1912: Littlemoor, Council, Victoria street (mixed), built in 1881, for 700 children; average attendance, 257; Hy. Lindsay Hudson, master.

Old Glossop Wesleyan School.
Slater's Royal National Directory 1850: Wright Amelia, Hall St.
White's History, Gazetteer & Directory of Derbyshire & Sheffield 1857: Listed under Academies is Cockayne Hanh., Hall st.
The Post Office Directory of Derbyshire, 1876: In the list of schools, it states that John Addleshaw was master of the Wesleyan School.
Morris & Co's Commercial Directory & Gazetteer of Ashton-Under-Lyne & District 1878 lists a Wesleyan School at Old Glossop.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1891: Wesleyan, Old Glossop (mixed), erected 1824, rebuilt 1876, for 225 children ; average attendance, 146; Thomas R. Haigh, master ; Miss Alice Ann Adshead, mistress.
Kelly's Directory of Derbyshire, 1895: Wesleyan, Old Glossop (mixed), erected 1824, rebuilt 1876, for 225 children; average attendance, 146; Walter Houseman, master; Miss Hannah Thornhill Adshead, mistress.
Bulmer's Derbyshire Directory 1895: Under Academies and Schools, Wesleyan School; Walter Houseman, master.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1899: Wesleyan, Old Glossop (mixed), erected 1824, rebuilt 1876, for 223 children; average attendance, 140; Walter Houseman, master; Miss Hannah Thornhill, mistress.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1908: Wesleyan, Old Glossop (mixed), erected 1824, rebuilt 1876, for 300 children; average attendance, 140; Walter Houseman, master ; Miss Cooper, mistress.
Kellys Directory of Derbyshire, 1912: Wesleyan, Old Glossop (mixed), erected 1824, rebuilt 1876, for 300 children; average attendance, 124; Walter Houseman, master; Miss Cooper, mistress.

Padfield Council School, Rhodes Street, Padfield.
Originally known as Padfield Day School, built in 1887 by the Rhodes family, owners of Hadfield Mill, for the education of the children of their employees.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1891: Day School, Padfield (mixed), erected 1887,for 217 children; average attendance, 197 ; William Lees Marshall, master
Kelly's Directory of Derbyshire, 1895: Day School, Padfield (mixed), erected 1887, for 217 children; average attendance 197; William Lees Marshall, master.
Bulmer's Directory of 1895 notes that the school was built by Messrs. Rhodes, owners of Hadfield Mill, for the accommodation of the children of their employees.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1899: Day School, Padfield (mixed), erected 1887, for 250 children ; average attendance, 200; William Lees Marshall, master.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1908: Padfield (mixed), erected in 1887, for 255 children; average attendance, 220; William Lees Marshall, master ; Mrs. Hannah Shepherd, mistress.
Kellys Directory of Derbyshire, 1912: Padfield (mixed), erected in 1887, for 255 children; average attendance, 184; William Lees Marshall, master; Mrs. Hannah Shepherd, mistress.

Pikes Lane Council School/West End Secondary School, Chadwick Street.
Built in 1912 to replace the Littlemoor Council School on Victoria Street and originally named Pikes Lane Council School.
In September 1930, the school was known as West End Secondary Modern and took pupils from aged 11 to 14 years.
The first headmaster was Major Frederick Herbert Morris, who had been Headmaster at Whitfield C of E primary for 28 years.

St Andrew's Church of England School, Hadfield.
In November, 1854, the Duke of Norfolk made the Hadfield church community a gift of 1,160 square yards of land for the site, and in 1855, Saint Andrew's Schools were built at a cost of £850.
The Post Office Directory of Derbyshire, 1876, identifies St Andrew's as a mixed National school of which Alfred Walker was master and Mrs Walker was mistress.
Morris & Co's Commercial Directory & Gazetteer of Ashton-Under-Lyne & District 1878: National School, Hadfield - Alfred Walker master; Miss Walker, Miss Barber and Miss Lewis, assistants.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1891: National, Hadfield (mixed), erected 1835, for 550 children; average attendance, 334; Alfred Walker, master.
Kelly's Directory of Derbyshire, 1895, says that the National (mixed) school at Hadfield was erected 1835 (it was actually 1854-55), for 550 children. The average attendance was 334 and Alfred Walker was master.
Bulmer's Derbyshire Directory 1895: Walker Alfred, schoolmaster, 11 Walker street
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1899: National, Hadfield (mixed), erected 1853,for 550 children; average attendance, 386; Alfred Walker, master.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1908: Hadfield, C. E. (mixed & infants), erected 1855, for 320 children; average attendance, 210 mixed & 50 infants, Percy John Holloway, master ; Mrs. Hutchinson, mistress.
Kellys Directory of Derbyshire, 1912: Hadfield, C. E. (mixed & infants), erected 1855, for 320 children; average attendance, 210; Percy John Holloway, master; Mrs. Hutchinson, mistress.

St Charles' Borromeo Roman Catholic School, Hadfield.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1891: Catholic, Hadfield (mixed), for 200 children ; average attendance, 130; Sisters of the Order of St. Paul, teachers
Kelly's Directory of Derbyshire, 1895: Catholic, Hadfield (mixed), for 200 children; average attendance 190; Sisters of the Order of St. Paul, teachers.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1899: Catholic, Hadfield (mixed), for 200 children; average attendance,165 ; Sisters of the Order of St. Paul, teachers.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1908: Catholic, Hadfield (mixed), built in 1858 & enlarged in 1904, for 300 children; average attendance, 190; Sisters of the Order of St. Paul, teachers.
Kellys Directory of Derbyshire, 1912: Catholic, Hadfield (mixed), built in 1858 & enlarged in 1904, for 300 children; average attendance, 197, Sisters of the Order of St. Paul, teachers.

St Luke's Church of England School, Talbot Street.
Talbot Street Day and Sunday Schools were erected to commemorate the Centenary of Sunday Schools, the foundation stone being laid August 14th 1880.
Built in 1880 by Mrs Anne Kershaw Wood for 250 children and enlarged in 1897 to accommodate 350 children.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1891: National, Talbot street (girls & infants), built in 1880 for 250 children; average attendance, 162 ; Miss Jane Tattersall, mistress.
Kelly's Directory of Derbyshire, 1895, has a list of schools including this entry. "National, Talbot street (girls & infants), built in 1880 for 250 children; average attendance, 162; Miss Jane Tattersall, mistress".
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1899: National, Talbot street (girls & infants), built in 1880 & enlarged in 1897, for 350 children; average attendance, 200; William Henkinson, master.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1908: Talbot st. C. E. (girls & infants), built in 1880 & enlarged in 1897, for 350 children; average attendance, 240; William Hankinson, master; Miss Bentham, mistress.
Kellys Directory of Derbyshire, 1912: Talbot st. C. E. (girls & infants), built in 1880 & enlarged in 1897, for 350 children; average attendance, 230; William Hankinson, master; Miss Bentham, mistress.

St Mary's Roman Catholic School, Whitfield.
The Roman Catholic Schools in Saint Mary's Road were commenced in August, 1853, and opened in 1854. Their cost was £1,300.
The Post Office Directory of Derbyshire, 1876: In St. Mary's Road, there is a handsome Infants' School belonging to the Roman Catholics, to which is attached a small convent for the religious teachers who are in charge of it.
Morris & Co's Commercial Directory & Gazetteer of Ashton-Under-Lyne & District 1878 mentions a school for infants in St. Mary’s Road, to which is attached a small convent for the teachers.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1891: Catholic, St. Mary’s rd. for 200 children ; average attendance, 180; Sisters of the Order of St. Paul, teachers.
Kelly's Directory of Derbyshire, 1895: Catholic, St. Mary's road, for 200 children; average attendance 70; Sisters of the Order of St. Paul, teachers.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1899: Catholic, St. Mary’s road, for 400 children; average attendance, 223 ; Sisters of the Order of St. Paul, teachers.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1908: Catholic, St. Mary’s road, for 400 children ; average attendance, 219; Sisters of the Order of St. Paul, teachers.
Kellys Directory of Derbyshire, 1912: Catholic, St. Mary's road, for 400 children; average attendance, 200; Sisters of the Order of St. Paul, teachers.

St. Philip Howard RC, St. Mary's Road.
Opened September 4th 1961 as Blessed Philip Howard High School to accommodate 260 pupils.
The Official Souvenir Brochure states "After well over a hundred years the three schools of All Saints, St Charles and St Mary's, finished their existence as all-age schools, when their seniors were transferred to the new school on a site adjoining St Mary's Church".
In 1970 the school was re-named St Philip Howard and in 1974 obtained comprehensive status.

Simmondley Independent School.
Bagshaw's Directory of Derbyshire 1846: In 1844, the Independents erected by subscription a handsome school.
White's History, Gazetteer & Directory of Derbyshire & Sheffield 1857: In 1844, the Independents erected by subscription a handsome school.

Unitarian School, Fitzallan street.
Morris & Co's Commercial Directory & Gazetteer of Ashton-Under-Lyne & District 1878: Miss Curtis Pyle, mistress

Waterside Wesleyan School.
White's History, Gazetteer & Directory of Derbyshire & Sheffield 1857: The Wesleyan Methodists have a large day school, established in 1808, enlarged in 1832, and rebuilt in 1854; it will hold about 400 children and the average attendance is 120. A large School Room was erected here in 1856, at a cost of £600, raised by subscriptions, exclusive of the site, which was given by the late Duke of Norfolk.
Morris & Co's Commercial Directory & Gazetteer of Ashton-Under-Lyne & District 1878: Infant School, Waterside, Hadfield - Miss Jane Hall, mistress
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1891: Infants’, Waterside, Hadfield, built in 1872, for 170 children; average attendance, 136 ; Miss Ruth Turner, mistress.
Kelly's Directory of Derbyshire, 1895: Infants', Waterside, Hadfield; built in 1872, for 170 children; average attendance, 136; Miss A. E. Hall, mistress.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1899: Infants’, Waterside, Hadfield, built in 1872, for 170 children; average attendance, 136; Miss A. E. Hall, mistress.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1908: Waterside, Hadfield, C. E. (infants’), built in 1872, for 170 children; average attendance, 60; Mrs. Martha Ann Fox, mistress.
Kellys Directory of Derbyshire, 1912: Waterside, Hadfield, C. E. (infants'), built in 1872, for 170 children; average attendance, 45; Mrs. Martha Ann Fox, mistress.

Whitfield Church of England School, Ashton Street.
Built in 1848 by the Wood family to educate the children of their mill workers. Originally to accommodate 140 children it was later enlarged for 400. In 1887 the school was improved and extended with a separate Department for Infants.
Slater's Royal National Directory 1850: National School (girls'), Whitfield - Miss Wright, mistress.
The Post Office Directory of Derbyshire, 1855: Robinson Ann (Mrs.), mistress of National school.
White's History, Gazetteer & Directory of Derbyshire & Sheffield, 1857, in describing Whitfield church, tells us "Adjoining the parsonage are the National Schools erected in 1847, at a cost of £1,100. It is a substantial stone building for boys and girls, with a residence for the teacher; will accommodate 300 children.". Listed under Academies is Robinson Ann, National schoolmistress.
The Post Office Directory of Derbyshire, 1876, in the list of schools, states that Herbert Williams was master and Mrs Williams, mistress.
Morris & Co's Commercial Directory & Gazetteer of Ashton-Under-Lyne & District 1878 lists a National School at Whitfield.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1891: National, Whitfield (mixed), for 560 children ; average attendance, 340 ; George Edward Cox, master ; Misses S. A. Morriss, A. Green & J. B. Shepley, mistresses
Kelly's Directory of Derbyshire, 1895, has a list of schools including this entry. "National, Whitfield (mixed & infants), for 560 children; average attendance, 340; George Edward Cox, master; J. A. Pearson, assistant master; Misses S. A. Morriss, J. B. Shepley, Janet Cox & Gertrude Cox-Sutcliffe, mistresses.".
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1899: National, Whitfield (mixed & infants), for 560 children; average attendance, 340 ; George Edward Cox, master; F. H. Morris, assistant master; Misses S. A. Morriss, Janet Cox, Gertrude Cox & E. Sutcliffe, mistresses.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1908: Whitfield, C. E. (mixed & infants), for 580 children; average attendance, 550; F. H. Morris, master; Miss Gertrude Bradwell, infants’ mistress.
Kellys Directory of Derbyshire, 1912: Whitfield, C. E. (mixed & infants), for 580 children; average attendance, 510; F. H. Morris, master; Miss Gertrude Bradwell, infants' mistress.
Early head teachers of the school were: Miss Wright 1848 - 1850; Mrs Robinson 1850 - 1856; Mr Kirkman 1856 - 1859 (the first Certified teacher, died aged 24 years in 1859; Mr Eckersley 1859 - 1873; Hubert Williams 1873 - 1876; George Edward Cox 1876 - 1902; Frederick Herbert Morris 1902 - 1930; William Victor Furniss 1930 - 1937; Herbert A Whitehead 1937.

Whitfield Endowed School, Hague Street, Whitfield, Glossop.
The school was opened for teaching on 22nd November, 1778.
Pigot's Directories of Derbyshire 1835 and 1842 list Hague’s Charity School, Whitfield - John Dearnaley, master.
January 4th 1842, John Dearnally, schoolmaster of Hague Endowed School, died of cancer, aged 65.
May 29th 1844, James Bosley, ex-silk manufacturer and schoolmaster, died.
Bagshaw's Directory of Derbyshire 1846: Joseph Haigh or Hague, Esq., by indentures of lease and release dated 10th and 11th January, 1779, conveyed to John Hague and eight others, a building which he had lately erected on a plot of land at Whitfield, for a school, and for the residence of a schoolmaster for the instruction of poor children within the parish of Glossop; and also a messuage at Low Loughton, in Bowden Middlecale, in the parish of Glossop, with several fields containing in the whole 7a. 2r. 9p. Cheshire measure, upon trust that they should in the first place, pay all rates and taxes, and should pay the clear rents to the schoolmaster, who should be appointed and reside at the school to instruct all the children within the said parish, not being under four years of age, in reading, writing, and arithmetic and the church catechism. By a memorandum indorsed on the indenture, and signed by Mr Haigh, it is stated that on further consideration, he directed the master should be at liberty to receive the following payments,—for reading, 1d. A week; writing, 2d.; and arithmetic 3d. On the 28th May, 1724, John Harrison, the survivor of the original trustees, conveyed the premises to John White, and seven others, subject to the alteration with regard to the price paid by children as above. The school is open to all the parish on the terms proposed; about 120 attend. The master occupies a dwelling house with a garden adjoining, and the school room. The other premises consist of a dwelling house now let in two tenements, and about 17a. of land, statute measure, let for £32 per annum. The schoolmaster also receives £3 14s. 6d. per annum, as the dividends arising on £124 4s. 0d., three per cent, consols, being the produce of a legacy of £100 given by the will of the said Joseph Haigh, He also receives the sum of £1 5s. per annum, as the interest of one moiety of £50 given by Mary Doxon.
Slater's Royal National Directory 1850: Hague's charity school, Whitfield - John Ball, master.
The Post Office Directory of Derbyshire, 1855: Bardsley John, master of Hague's charity school and Bardsley Rebecca (Mrs.), mistress of Hague's charity school.
White's History, Gazetteer & Directory of Derbyshire & Sheffield 1857: In 1778 Joseph Hague erected a building for a school, and for the residence of a schoolmaster for the instruction of poor people within the parish of Glossop. The schoolmaster was to reside at the school to instruct all the children within the said parish, not being under four years of age, in reading, writing, and arithmetic and the church catechism (a subsequent change meant that the master could receive weekly payments of 1d for reading, 2d for writing and 3d for arithmetic). The school is open to all the parish on the terms proposed; about 120 attend. The master occupies a dwelling house with a garden adjoining, the school room. Listed under Academies is Bardsley Jno., master of Hague's school.
August 13th, 1860, John Ball, schoolmaster, Norfolk Street, died, aged 51.
The Post Office Directory of Derbyshire, 1876: Hague's endowed school was founded by Joseph Hague, esq., in 1779, and endowed with £39 yearly; Mr. George Ford is master (named as John Ford in the list of schools).
February 10th, 1878, Quarter-Master George Ford, of the 21st Derby R. Vol., schoolmaster of Hague's Endowed School, died, aged 36.
Morris & Co's Commercial Directory & Gazetteer of Ashton-Under-Lyne & District 1878: Hague’s Endowed School, Whitfield - Mrs. Jane Ford, mistress.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1891: Endowed,Whitfield (mixed),with master’s residence,founded in 1779 by Joseph Hague esq. of Park hall, Hayfield, & endowed with £39 yearly,for 144 children; average attendance, 135; Walter P. Evason, master; Mrs. Elizabeth Ann Evason, mistress
Kelly's Directory of Derbyshire, 1895: Endowed, Whitfield (mixed), with master's residence, founded in 1779 by Joseph Hague esq. of Park hall, Hayfield, endowed with £39 yearly, for 144 children; average attendance 135; Walter P. Evason, master; Mrs. Elizabeth Ann Evason, mistress.
Bulmer's Derbyshire Directory 1895: Evason Walter Pedley, schoolmaster.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1899: Endowed, Whitfield (mixed), with master’s residence, founded in 1779 by Joseph Hague esq. of Park hall, Hayfield, & endowed with £39 yearly, for 144 children; average attendance, 135; Walter P. Evason, master; Mrs. Elizabeth Ann Evason, mistress.
Kelly's Derbyshire Directory 1908: Endowed, Whitfield (mixed), with master’s residence, founded in 1779 by Joseph Hague esq. of Park hall, Hayfield, & endowed with £39 yearly, for 144 children; average attendance, 70; Walter P. Evason, master; Mrs. Elizabeth Ann Evason, mistress. The entry noted that the school was not under the control of the L. E. A.
Kellys Directory of Derbyshire, 1912: Endowed, Whitfield (mixed), with master's residence, founded in 1779 by Joseph Hague esq. of Park hall, Hayfield, & endowed with £39 yearly, for 144 children; average attendance, 70; Walter P. Evason, master; Mrs. Elizabeth Ann Evason, mistress.

Whitfield Primitive Methodist School/Shrewsbury Street School.
Pigot's Directory of Derbyshire 1842: Joseph Henry Farrand, Green vale.
Bagshaw's Directory of Derbyshire 1846 mentions "a day school of about 70 children" being kept in the chapel at Green Vale.
Slater's Royal National Directory 1850: Joseph Henry Farrand, Green vale.
White's History, Gazetteer & Directory of Derbyshire & Sheffield, 1857 states that the Primitive Methodists had a chapel at Green Vale, erected in 1835, in which a day school of 80 children are kept. In addition, listed under Academies, is Wood Geo., Shrewsbury st.
Francis Sumner wanted the site of the Green Vale chapel and school to extend Wren Nest Mill so gave land off Shrewsbury Street for new premises.
June 11th, 1858, George Wood, school master, Bernard Street, died, aged 53.
White's Directory of Sheffield & 20 Miles Around 1862: Listed under Academies is Ferrand Joseph Henry, Shrewsbury st.; home High street

Other Schools
Pigot's Directory of Derbyshire 1835 lists, under Academies and Schools: John Nutter, Glossop.
Pigot's Directory of Derbyshire 1842 lists Academies and Schools run by: Sarah & Hannah Kelsall (day and boarding) Glossop and Robert Watts Micklethwaite, Glossop.
Slater's Royal National Directory 1850 lists Academies and Schools run by: Samuel Roberts, Glossop and John Sellars, Glossop.
White's History, Gazetteer & Directory of Derbyshire & Sheffield 1857: Listed under Academies are Adlington Mary Ann & Ellis Sarah, Arundel st; Davis Frances, Norfolk st; Drabble Eliz., Charles st.
White's Directory of Sheffield & 20 Miles Around 1862: Listed under Academies are Glossop Mary and Eliza, Norfolk street; Union, Old Glossop, Jane Banks.
The Post Office Directory of Derbyshire, 1876: Hyde Sarah & Hannah (Misses), day school, Primrose lane.



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Last updated: 14 January 2021